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GreatSchools Rating

Hubbertville School

Public | PK-12

 

Be sure to visit

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted August 16, 2014

I graduated from this school and my biggest mistake was sending my kids there. If i had it to do over I would NEVER have sent them there. The faculty places way too much emphasis on sports here. Ive even heard one coach here tell some of the atheletes that they are the leaders here at Hubbertville. Which I strongly disagree. I would bet my last dollar that every positive comment left on here was from a parent of a student that played some sort of sport here or a student that played a sport. If your not into sports your simply out!! Thats all that matters here. Bullying here is out of control and despite having talked with the Principal Tim Dunavant nothing has changed. Nothing will ever change here. Very few teachers here and I mean very few are truly interested in teaching your kids. Send your kids elswhere.. Im serious. This place is a JOKE!!! Way too many ignorant people around this area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2014

This school is wonderful and the dispite the other negative comments my review is from someone who loved being in highschool here. The Principal, Mr. Dunavant, is actually not the problem at all. He gives each child a choice of punishment. They get to choose the first two times. If they do not benefit then he decides the punishment. For children who were taught how to behave at home this is not a problem. Unfortunatly, there are some parents who have ruined what there children could have been. On the other note, If you went to school here and werent college and career ready it is probably your own fault. The classes now are strictly ACT or career classes . This school is great . I would want my children to be able to go here. I believe if we begin teahing our children when they are small how to be a moral person in society they will act that way the rest of their lives. That is where most parents mess up:in the home.


Posted October 15, 2012

To fully understand, experience with all five senses. Hubbertville school is a great place for students who want to network with a lot of people. The close-knit community is known for coming together during the tuff times and celebrating in the good. I attended HUB from pre-K to 12th grade.There was opportunities available for everyone, all you have to do is ask.I had some great teachers and some not so great teachers, but the not so great teachers are only there for a short period of time, because the teachers are evaluated and must meet certain standards. The school does well in keeping up and staying ahead in Technology in the classroom. For students seeking challenging courses, I recommend taking ACCESS classes. For students needing extra help, I reccommend asking someone privately, or taking advantage of announced remedial opportunities. The school has a small student to faculty ratio. The school's leadership is dedicated to equality, fairness, and helping students achieve. Parents and Students who fail to show respect will miss out. I challenge you to enrich yourself in Hubbertville and experience it with all five senses!


Posted October 10, 2012

I started going to this school in kindergarten and graduated in 2011. That place is my heart and soul. When I get finished with college and get ready to settle down, I want to raise my family there! It's a wonderful place to grow up. The teachers there are amazing and always do their best to help you. That school is the reason I have been able to succeed this far. I love that place and cherish my memories there. It might be a tiny school, but it makes up for it in heart!


Posted January 14, 2012

I am a graduate from Hubbertville as well as my children. Is the school perfect? Absolutely not. However, my children, myself, and many more have gone on to major university and completed 4 and 6 year degrees without any problems. I was an athlete as well as my children. I don't recall any special privileges when it came to academics. We earned what we got. However, many hours in addition to the regular school day was spent which helped us become dedicated, and dependable individuals. What did we gain by being a participate in the athletic program, winning records, area champs,state playoffs, memories, and life lessons. Hubbertville School has a safe environment for students. Education is like any thing else - you get out of it whatever you are willing to put in to it!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2011

The teachers at this school for the most part are great. They work and go far beyond what most would to help the students. However the principal of the school, Tim Dunavant, is the worst choice ever. There have been kids beyond violent in the school and his answer is in school suspension, so they can clean the school. Hubbertville is supposed to be a zero tolerance, but apparently the administration doesn't understand what this means. The asst. principal however is wonderful, but it is true that one person can ruin a school, just look at what the school was in 2000 and what it is now. Pathetic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2009

Those whom want to learn will learn. I went to Hubbertville and ive turned out just fine. To the negative comment(Feb.22, 2009) Students should quit blaming 'their' academic and extracurricular shortcomings on the staff/faculty at Hubbertville. Since 2004, that school has produced some of the top college students in America. Some of us have gone on to Samuel Ginn College of Engineering (Auburn), Harrison School of Pharmacy (Auburn), MSU Meteorology School, Engineering School at the univ. of Alabama, law school, and various nursing schools everywhere. So, dont blame 'the system'. Hubbertvilles' system is working just fine! Mr. JJ Stafford (comment from August 2006) , the athletic program at Hub turns boys into men. It may seem old-fashioned to such contemporaries such as yourself JJ, but theres more to sports than winning and losing. Hub (our coaches) teaches you about heart and how to react when your butts nailed to the wall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2009

I went to high school at Hubbertville and the teachers did NOT teach me what I needed to know. I specifically remember having a whole semester of a subject in which the teacher only gave us a few open-book worksheets. Some of the staff and teachers play favorites, and if a student has not gone to school there since elementary school, they get the short end of the stick. There are some excellent teachers there who care about their students, however. Unfortunately, there only one or two of these teachers, and they cannot compensate for the lack of good teachers. I also agree with a previous comment on here about how the athletics are considered more important than anything else. If a student is involved in anything besides sports, they are definitly under-appreciated and non-athletic programs are treated very unfairly.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 4, 2008

My three children went to Hubbertville,some of my grandchildren are going there.Wish they all could. Its a great place for kids to go to school. They have really good teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2008

I just moved to this school and I love it! Every one is sooo nice and freindly! The teachers are great and its alot better than some other schools!
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 1, 2008

Well I am enrolled at Hub and Its not that bad of a place compared to what these people are saying. The discipline here is fine not that many people get into trouble as other schools. The teachers are also fine they teach us what we need to know and when I get ready to go to college when I gradute in 2009 I will be prepared.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 10, 2008

Hubbertville School has been and still is an excellent place for students to get an education. The teachers are very dedicated to helping students succeed. I feel that it is a very safe place for my children to attend school and that they are being well prepared for the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 18, 2007

This school has major bullying and disiplinary problems. I will never put my children through the horrors that I have recieved here. Athletics come before any academic programs.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 15, 2007

I graduated from Hubbertville, and was SO unprepared for college. The high school teachers, for the most part, were not good teachers. If a student has ambitions or if you are a parent and want your child to be prepared for the college, look elsewhere.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 15, 2007

Hubbertville School is a wonderful place to send your children if you are looking for a safe and peaceful environment. The size of the school allows the instruction to be much more individually focused. The faculty and staff are excellent and the community is truly a great place to live. We moved here from out of state and immediately fell in love with the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2006

I give Hubbertville faculty credit for keeping the focus on the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2006

Athletic programs are severely out-dated. Head Football coach is 20 years behind the times. But has uncanny staying power for a coach that has averaged less than one win a year for the last 6 years, and hasn't won a single game in either of the last 2 years. New Principal seems to be a disciplinarian and savvy enough to stay ahead of the students. But don't all new principals? We'll see how he handles the driving and parking problems first. No emphasis on student success in the classroom. Money and time is all spent on keeping the poorest performers moving through the system, no matter how far behind they truly are. Top 1/3 is just left to sit and watch, no programs available for them to continue succeeding.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
46%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female82%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible83%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty86%
Not poverty91%

Reading

All Students88%
Female91%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty79%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female0%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White92%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant92%
Poverty95%
Not poverty88%

Reading

All Students86%
Female95%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty85%
Not poverty88%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a

Reading

All Students96%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant96%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female74%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White81%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty79%
Not poverty85%

Reading

All Students81%
Female79%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White81%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty79%
Not poverty85%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female94%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female88%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible87%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible67%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant75%
Poverty62%
Not poverty87%

Reading

All Students81%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty67%
Not poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students88%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White88%
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students69%
Female81%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant69%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
76%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
100%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Not migrant100%
Poverty100%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students61%
Female77%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White61%
Free lunch eligible59%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English61%
Not migrant61%
Poverty58%
Not poverty67%

Math

All Students84%
Female77%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Not migrant84%
Poverty89%
Not poverty75%

Reading

All Students65%
Female69%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White65%
Free lunch eligible53%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Not migrant65%
Poverty58%
Not poverty75%

Social Studies

All Students71%
Female69%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White71%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English71%
Not migrant71%
Poverty74%
Not poverty67%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students97%
Female92%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty95%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students94%
Female92%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Not migrant94%
Poverty89%
Not poverty0%

Math

All Students97%
Female92%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty95%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students94%
Female92%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Not migrant94%
Poverty95%
Not poverty92%

Social Studies

All Students87%
Female75%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Not migrant87%
Poverty89%
Not poverty83%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 99% 58%
Black 1% 34%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 5%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 59%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Timothy Joe Dunavant
Fax number
  • (205) 487-3375

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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7360 County Rd 49
Fayette, AL 35555
Website: Click here
Phone: (205) 487-2845

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