Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Rogers High School

Public | PK-12

 

Be sure to visit

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

17 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted April 1, 2014

Anyone who gives this school over a 3 is lying to you. Athletics are much more important than academics, they still have books from the early 2000's, and are torn up, the computer labs arent up to date, etc. Yet new weight equipment, gym floors, etc. are able to be upgraded without a thought. Half of the teachers SHOULD NOT be teachers, they complain like no other about students, there bosses, except for when a "higher up" is present. There are a handful who should definitely not be there, as they are hateful to people. Helps if you're one of the "good ol boys" also, as they get special treatment. A 4/5 or 5/5 stars? please.


Posted February 15, 2013

I am a current student at Rogers High School. This school places too much emphasis on athletics rather than academics. Athletics are certainly important, but academics should be a school's number one priority. No advanced placement classes are offered at this school, with the exception of advanced English (which is still not an AP certified class). The school's reasoning is that they do not have enough funds to allocate the purchase of textbooks (a simple solution to this issue could be having students purchase their own books for $45 or simply taking $1,000 out of the overflowing athletic fund). I often feel that I have missed out on many academic opportunities by attending this school. Most of the teachers worry about themselves and not the students. Many miss teaching at least half the class period to finish gossiping about students with the other teachers in the hallway. Many also give their children (and their colleagues' children) special treatment. If you are not from the area, I certainly do not recommend sending your child to RHS; they will get lost in the shuffle.


Posted September 7, 2011

The school is very good if you are from the area... IF you are an outsider forget it. Bullying seems to be allowed as long as it is directed to an outsider. If confronted it is said, "Aw shucks, boys will be boys" Every level of adminstration looks the other way if the bullying is toward an outsider.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2010

I graduated in 2008 from Rogers and loved every minute or it! It is a great school and the teachers are very supportive and encouraging.


Posted June 26, 2009

I am the mother of 3 and current have one graduate from Rogers a 5th grader and an 11th grader. The truth of the matter is that it definitely does matter who you are (what family you belong to). It is a common phrase 'they're outsiders'. With my first child and my step child we struggled to be included and treated fairly. Now that we have been in the community for almost 20 years my 2 younger children do not have to deal with these issues. We are no longer considered outsiders. And for the academics. Well, some teachers are great and some not so great. I guess that's the case everywhere. My daughter is extremely sharp, eager for knowledge, and loves to read. She came to my husband recently and told him that she wanted to change schools because she wants a better education than they offer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2009

My father was an RHS graduate, my sisters and I are all RHS graduates and all my children will be RHS graduates by 2011. My only regret.....my grandchildren do not live close enough to attend RHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2008

It is a great school if you were born and raised here. If you are not one of the 'good ol boys' your kids are looked down on by both the students and the staff. Also the communications between the school and the parents needs major revamping. I have been asking for several where to find the list of school supplies needed for middle school and I have gotten NO response. When your child's grades start to drop there is no notification till you get a failing report card.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2007

As a former student at a competitive four-year University, I would say that Rogers has a long way to go before it is considered a school that adequately prepares students for further education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 8, 2007

I am the parent of 3 children in Rogers. 7th, 4th, and Kindy. We moved here from another state finding nothing but the best in this area in teaching and services for our kids. Having one of my kids in sp. ed. in another state and now here, I have been able to compare them. My son recieves twice as much here with a lot more concern, acceptance, and nurturing here. He loves going to school at Rogers. I can't say enough about their programs and how they deal with IEP's it has been a very smooth process moveing him into the school system. My oldest is in the marching band this year and absolutely loves it. My middle child is involved with cheerleading and can't wait for the jamboree this weekend. As a parent of 3, I can highly recommend Rogers for your child. Jennifer SAHM to 3
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2007

I am a graduate of Rogers High School, and my daughter is a graduate of RHS. I loved the school when I was there, and my heart is still with this school. My daughter started in kinderngarten and graduated in 2006. The teachers are very caring about their students and willing to work with the students to see that they get a great education. I feel that we have caring principal leadership and I am so proud to be called as RHS alumni and proud my daughter is also an RHS graduate. She was so impressed by her teachers that her goal to to teach at RHS when she graduates from college in three years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 26, 2007

I am a Rogers High School Alumni. I am not a parent but when my husband and I have children they will go to Rogers. I work with children who have been displaced from their homes and I can say from experience that the faculty at Rogers High School is excellent. I have a younger sibling who goes there and I know that this is a great school to send your children to and a great community to live in.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 29, 2005

I am a former student at Rogers High School and currently a Military Officer. When myself and my family exit military service, our kids are definitely going to Rogers. The quality of administration, teachers, and programs are secondary to none. If you want a school that truely cares about your childs education, this is the one!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 10, 2005

Academic programs are very good and varied for the college bound or blue collar students. Drama Club; Show Choir. Awesome band 100+ and growing with many parents involved. Many sports availble with many parents involved as well. Several of the sports team win State Championships or in Finals. Includes: football, baseball; tennis; vollyball; basketball; track & field; golf;and Cheerleaders. Many extracurricular activities. Excellent Special Needs facility with Awesome Teacher and Staff. The K-6 program is very good as well. Excellent teachers. Positive teacher/parent interaction with OPEN door policy K - 12. Very active PTA program. Our children have been to another county school and was NOT happy. They and we are very satisfied at Rogers School!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2005

I just want to let anyone & everyone know that my son now attends rogers and so far so GREAT! he has progressed so much in the two years that we have been here that i am overwhelmed. there is no way that I would ever think of changing schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2005

Our son attended Rogers during the 2002 and 2003 school years before moving to Brooks. We were very pleased with the quality of the teachers,administrators and facilities at Rogers. The overall atmosphere was happy and he had challenging work. He had no trouble with bullies at Rogers, while it was a BIG problem at Brooks High School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2004

It is obvious that the previous review was written either by an angry student or by someone who knows nothing about rogers high school. We have quality teachers and administrators who genuinely care about their students. Also, we have the best cafeteria in the county. Just ask anyone who regularly eats at the other cafeterias and they will tell you where they would eat if given the choice. As for the soap in the bathrooms, we had that priviledge in the past only to have it abused by some of the students ( probably the same one who wrote the previous review)!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 7, 2004

THis school is absolutely horrible.The teachers are mistreat the students and the bathrooms have no soap..The lunch room is very nasty there's food everywhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female88%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty75%
Not poverty87%

Reading

All Students89%
Female95%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty88%
Not poverty91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female90%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligible79%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Poverty87%
Not poverty86%

Reading

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Poverty93%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White98%
Free lunch eligible97%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special education86%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Poverty98%
Not poverty98%

Reading

All Students93%
Female95%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special education71%
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty89%
Not poverty98%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female88%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty83%
Not poverty93%

Reading

All Students93%
Female94%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty88%
Not poverty97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female82%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty80%
Not poverty90%

Reading

All Students94%
Female95%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty91%
Not poverty96%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible98%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Poverty98%
Not poverty98%

Reading

All Students88%
Female91%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty84%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students86%
Female86%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligible93%
Special education38%
General population94%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty79%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students90%
Female91%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White90%
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty89%
Not poverty90%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
80%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
93%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
0%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
96%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
92%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
0%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant98%
Poverty98%
Not poverty98%

Language

All Students80%
Female82%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant80%
Poverty78%
Not poverty82%

Math

All Students94%
Female91%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty89%
Not poverty98%

Reading

All Students90%
Female91%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible87%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty83%
Not poverty96%

Social Studies

All Students93%
Female91%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Not migrant100%
Poverty100%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students0%
Female0%
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English0%
Not migrant0%
Poverty0%
Not poverty0%

Math

All Students97%
Female98%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty96%
Not poverty99%

Reading

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible97%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English99%
Not migrant99%
Poverty98%
Not poverty100%

Social Studies

All Students0%
Female0%
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English0%
Not migrant0%
Poverty94%
Not poverty0%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 98% 58%
Black 1% 34%
Hispanic 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 43%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Michael Lynn Stamps
Fax number
  • (256) 757-9625

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

300 Rogers Ln
Florence, AL 35634
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 757-3106

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools



Lexington School
Lexington, AL


Riverhill School
Florence, AL


Wilson High School
Florence, AL



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT