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GreatSchools Rating

Fruitdale High School

Public | K-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted September 26, 2013

My school is a great little country school. We don't have to worry about safety and we get an award every year for being one of the best schools in the U>S.A. Every year all of our Seniors pass the EXIT EXAM. GO PIRATES!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 26, 2013

I'm a Junior at Fruitdale High School. What I like about this school is that it's small, everyone gets alone, teachers are nice and helps their students, and they keep everything in order. The things that could be improved would be getting better lockers, having a better playground for the kids, and one main thing is a new building because the one we have now is old and falling apart.


Posted September 28, 2010

They care about your kids. Its not a popularity contest. My child is doing so much better in school since moving to this school district. I even want to participate in all the activities such as the fall festival and PTO. I love it!!!! Hooray for a great school and great teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2009

Hi, my name is Turner and I attend Fruitdale High School. Every other school talks about us because they think that we are nothing. We have great athletics and an incredible education system. We take pride in our school and I absolutely love it. I am a cheerleader and I play softball it is awesome.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 5, 2009

I am a parent and I have 3 boys that all went to FHS. I think it's a GREAT School. It maybe a small school but small is good. The teachers there are great. You will not hear me complain.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 23, 2008

My name is Baleigh and I attend Fruitdale High School and I love it.I am a Junior High cheerleader and we work hard to keep our spots on the squad.We have to maintain a minimum 'C' avarage to participate in any sport.People talk about us like we are nothing.You people are wrong many students have received scholorships from great colleges.I am very proud to be part of the Fruitdale family and I always will be.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 24, 2008

My husband and I both attend Fruitdale, we would not send our two children anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 20, 2008

My husband and i attended fruitdale. Now both our kids go there. We at fhs have a lot to be thankful for. We as parents are doing all we know to do for the students. Like any other school, there are some who think they are above discipline, but the parents stand up when it comes to a child being bullied. Coach mason is a wonderful coach as teacher. He took us to the playoffs for the first time in years! to him, academics comes first then football. We need more teachers, coaches like him. I am proud to be called a pirate! go big purple!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2008

I have 3 children that attend Fruitdale. My husband graduated from there. We may be a small school but we have worked hard to better ourselves over the past years. I am a very involved parent and I can honestly say I am proud of FHS. My oldest daughter is on the JV cheer squad and they were just awarded superior overall at camp. They were also invited to cheer at the Capital Bowl in Orlando. This is just one of the many accomplishments of FHS, we have a lot to be proud of!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2008

We have improved greatly in the past recent years. We had the highest test scores in the county , all our seniors graduated and sports are going great.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 21, 2007

Anyways I just would like to share to everybody that our school is a good school to suggest enrolling your children in. Eventhough our school may not have over 600 and something odd students attending there every day. I think that helps people get to know one another without confusing that person with someone else. I would like to add about our new teachers this year. Our school was grateful to have Mrs. Ankerson aboard as a math teacher and to some of us a friend at Fruitdale, and I would like to welcome Coach Mason, a wonderful History teacher and a very sweet person to know.I hope U enjoy FHS I do.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 13, 2006

Fhs is a very poor school. I attended FHS k-12 and I think going to a small school and having a lot of friends are great, but education is just as important and the kids are not getting it at FHS. The test scores do say a lot about this school as a whole, including the teachers and the students. The courses offered when I was there were out of date. The band was great then but it is not so great anymore. I never received or saw anyone receive one on one help when I was there.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 16, 2006

I graduated from FHS and loved it. I also got a full paid scholarship to a 4 year division I university and now have a 4.0 there. When I came to college, I actually was more educated than many people in my class. FHS was a wonderful learning experience and my friends were true. I see many of them still today. Most of my former classmates are graduating from various universities and getting great jobs. For those who put down FHS, if you don't succeed, quit blaming others because you didn't pay attention in class.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted March 11, 2006

I am a senior at Fruitdale High School. You may think because the test scores are down that it is the teachers...but no it is mostly the students that don't want to put out. Yes, the teachers here are wonderful. They help us when we need help. You should really see how they have helped all the ones taking the Graduation Exams. I don't see how any one could not pass it now with the help of them. We should really give them credit. Our band program is not the best any more, but we do still have one. The football team, baseball team, and softball team are really good to get into. No, we may not win, but we do know how to have fun. A small school is really great. You get to have one on one with teachers and staff. You also get to know everyone personally.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 1, 2006

Ilove Fruitdale High School. I am a student their and proud of it. People talk about Fruitdale like it is nothing, but the thing is that their is better teachers and staff their then any other school in Washington County. The number of students their makes it a whole lot easyer to learn. Everyone at the school gets along and are all friends. We are able to play in a whole lot more extracurricular activities then some other schools. So when I here someone talking about Fruitdale I take up for my School. I am glad I have grown up in a school like Fruitdale High School.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 19, 2005

Fruitdale High School is an ok school. But I really think this school needs alot of changes. For one thing I think there is only a few teachers that care about the kids that go there. Mrs. Ballard is the best math teacher up at Fruitdale and if you need your kids help in math she can help you greatly. One thing im proud of is that there is alot of parents that TRY to help the school and i thank them for it. One more thing this school needs to be rebuilt.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 28, 2005

My children will never attend FHS. I think the 2005 test scores say it all about this school. Only a few teachers care about all of their students. I have never received one-on-one help when I needed it. You get to participate in a lot of extracurricular activities because the requirements are so easy and not enforced. Also the courses that are offered are outdated and limited. If you went to FHS and made it through college, be 'Grateful' that you were just smart. I have completed two years of college so far and do not give FHS any credit. I am just smart. I am ashamed to tell people I graduated from FHS.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 6, 2005

This is the best school! ^_^ I love how everyone is like family and is always there for you. This is a small school, so that makes it better. There's a lot of discipline now that we have a new assistant principal. O_o; The band program is great and the teachers are committed to our education. I feel at home here and will definitely send my kids here. (whenever that will be! ^_^)
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 14, 2005

I went to Fruitdale from k-12 and those were the best years of my life. I can't explain the closeness between my friends and myself. I am so greatful that I went to Fruitdale. It allowed me to make bonds with my entire class, and make memories that will last me a lifetime. I never worried about my safety. Everyone was really down to earth. As far as my education goes, I received enough scholarships to cover my entire college expenses to an out of state division one school, and I maintain a 4.0 GPA at this university. I remind people of that when they are quick to put down Fruitdale. I find it entertaining that most of those who put down Fruitdale, never went to school there. I am proud that I graduated from FHS
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 19, 2004

I think the school has good things about it and bad things. The good things are that it's a small school, so you get one-on-one help with the teachers. You can also participate in almost any extra-curricular activity you would like, where at a larger school, you choose one or mabye two. The bad things about the school are the class choices. The variety of courses are extremely limited. You don't really choose what classes you take, because there isn't many students, so we have enough teachers to teach that amount of students. Overall, I like the school. The staff is very helpful, the teachers are not strict, it's a very safe enviroment, and the classes are not too hard and not too easy.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

22 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
70%

2009

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

22 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
68%

2009

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

26 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
56%

2009

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

26 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
85%

2009

 
 
69%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 91% in 2012.

31 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
78%

2009

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2012.

31 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
65%

2009

 
 
74%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
92%

2009

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
85%

2009

 
 
71%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
54%

2009

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 86% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
73%

2009

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 79% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
80%

2009

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
80%

2009

 
 
72%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students100%
Femalen/a
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-povertyn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Femalen/a
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Poverty87%
Non-povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students31%
Femalen/a
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White38%
Free lunch eligible20%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population28%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant31%
Poverty17%
Non-povertyn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Femalen/a
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White81%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Poverty83%
Non-povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students71%
Female81%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White72%
Free lunch eligible61%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Poverty64%
Non-povertyn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female88%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White72%
Free lunch eligible61%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Poverty68%
Non-povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female68%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White81%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Poverty78%
Non-povertyn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female74%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White81%
Free lunch eligible67%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty74%
Non-povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female65%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White55%
Free lunch eligible48%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population66%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Poverty48%
Non-poverty64%

Reading

All Students66%
Female85%
Male48%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White70%
Free lunch eligible52%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Poverty59%
Non-poverty79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students53%
Female55%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White58%
Free lunch eligible47%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population59%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Poverty47%
Non-poverty58%

Reading

All Students72%
Female80%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White77%
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Poverty65%
Non-poverty79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 80% in 2012.

31 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
73%

2009

 
 
55%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
78%

2009

 
 
83%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students81%
Female94%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Poverty76%
Non-povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students46%
Female60%
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White48%
Free lunch eligible38%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population53%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Poverty44%
Non-poverty50%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
87%
Language

The state average for Language was 75% in 2012.

35 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
68%

2009

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
81%

2009

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2012.

36 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
73%

2009

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2009.

38 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
76%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 71% in 2012.

35 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
58%

2009

 
 
73%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 90% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 94% in 2009.

27 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
96%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 90% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
100%

2009

 
 
96%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students94%
Female100%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Poverty95%
Non-poverty93%

Language

All Students83%
Female89%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White80%
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Poverty86%
Non-poverty79%

Math

All Students92%
Female95%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Poverty91%
Non-poverty93%

Reading

All Students81%
Female85%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Poverty77%
Non-poverty86%

Social Studies

All Students66%
Female63%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White64%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population72%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Poverty71%
Non-poverty57%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Language

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Social Studies

All Students95%
Female91%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Poverty91%
Non-poverty100%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 58%
Black 22% 34%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 1%
Hispanic 1% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 63%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Dr Alfred E Taylor
Fax number
  • (251) 827-6573

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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Ray Coaker Rd
Fruitdale, AL 36539
Website: Click here
Phone: (251) 827-6655

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