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GreatSchools Rating

Zion Chapel High School

Public | K-12

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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Parent involvement

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13 reviews of this school


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Posted May 19, 2014

This school is a very good school. The involvement in the school is unreal. If your looking for you child a safe place this is it. We have some of the best teachers in the state. As well as the top testing scores In the State. Its just a awesome place for education and athletics.


Posted January 31, 2012

I attended Zion Chapel from middle school through High school. I can agree that the community here is tightly knit, but the education here is remedial at best. There are too few electives offered and only one foreign language available. If you do not fail a class, you will find yourself taking the same class twice anyway, such as two or three home ec or ag classes, because there simply isn't enough variety. The educators do strive for their best, but the funding and supplies are limited. Many individual teachers are superb, but there were a few bad apples too, that gave crossword puzzles and word finds rather than actually teach a structured class. When I reached college, I was challenged to keep up with the requirements and expectations of college level education. The school also tended to fall victim to cliques, where you either belonged, or you didn't. Please take this into account if your child doesn't fall into the narrow social expectations of this rural school.


Posted November 10, 2011

I am a graduate of ZC and I can say, I loved the being at a small school. Students get that 1-on-1 attention they need to be successful and having teachers who REALLY care about them being successful. I'm sure of how things are going now, but I believe that my HS education set the foundation for my successful career. ZCHS Class of 1997.


Posted July 21, 2011

Attended Zion Chapel in the 90's and am so glad I got out and moved to California after years of remedial education I finally got into the University of San Diego.


Posted June 20, 2011

i myself attended this school 13 yrs ago and loved it. The students and faculty are close and kind with eachother. Best school i ever attended.


Posted April 22, 2009

At first, I wasn't sure about my elementary sudent and my high school student attending this small school. It took a few months to adjust, it is a very close nit communtiy. The academics of this school are great! The sports program, it seems that if your child has not already been playing for years at this school - they do not make the cut. My opinion is that the school should be more involved with supporting the youth sports program, because the youth sports program accepted any of the childre with open arms! After all...this is were the fututre atheletes for Zion Chapel are learning their sports abilities!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2008

Great place to raise a family around and send your bright kids to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2008

My husband graduated from ZC. Untill I met him and he's sisters, I had never heard anyone say that they loved the school that they went to. But, now since my children go there I can understand. It is a very close nit community that does put a lot of attention and time to their children. The only thing that I have had problems with is the way the elementry is so slow to let the parents know when things are going on at the school or field trips that the parents can participate in. The children may have a fild trip and the parents not know about it unitl one week before it happens. Other than that it is a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2007

This is the best school you could possible send your children to. The education that my child is receiving is top rate. The teachers are very helpful and understanding.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2007

I am a Zion Chapel graduate. I did fine in college. I had a great math teacher in high school and I actually help my friends' kids with their math. I love Zion Chapel and if I lived closer I would send my children there.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 5, 2006

My personal opion on this school ...im afaid to say isn't very good.The academics offered at this school are very poor.The elememtray i have to say has made a vast improvement but it is as if when the student get to the high school their education is of no importance.I have a child who has graduated from this very school and she as well as her fellow classmates srtuggled thru college.The band has asloo improved ,but our sports remains the same.Their is not alot to do for extracurricular activities either.The invovlement at the school is actually pretty high. Having said all this i do not wish to just insult this school but i iwant to bring their attention to their may faults.thank you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2005

Zion Chapel is an excellent rural small school. If you like that setting, with smaller numbers of students and a safe, pleasant environment, I highly suggest it. My wife and I are both graduates of ZC, and our kids now attend as well. The band and sports programs are on the upswing, and our athletic club membership is at one of it's highest levels in years! Volleyball, basketball and softball are available for girls, with basketball, baseball and football for boys. The band membership is at a high level, and growing. The softball, baseball and football teams made the playoffs last year, and should all have a shot again this year. FBLA, FCCLA, FFA, FCA, SGA, etc. are all available for students who are interested in those areas. The elementary school was recently expanded due to the growth of the school, with another expansion being considered.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2005

I like ZCHS it is a good school and it has a great Band! It also has sports!
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female88%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant84%
Poverty80%
Not poverty91%

Reading

All Students87%
Female94%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Poverty85%
Not poverty91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female80%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty73%
Not poverty93%

Reading

All Students93%
Female91%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty90%
Not poverty97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students91%
Female89%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Poverty87%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students89%
Female89%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty89%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female97%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty83%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students94%
Female100%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty90%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female81%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible64%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant72%
Poverty62%
Not poverty83%

Reading

All Students90%
Female90%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty82%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female84%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty67%
Not poverty97%

Reading

All Students74%
Female76%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible59%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant74%
Poverty63%
Not poverty86%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students78%
Female81%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty78%
Not poverty78%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students68%
Female69%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible54%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant68%
Poverty54%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
77%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
96%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students97%
Female100%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty94%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students81%
Female90%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Not migrant81%
Poverty72%
Not poverty90%

Math

All Students86%
Female97%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Not migrant86%
Poverty75%
Not poverty97%

Reading

All Students87%
Female97%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Not migrant87%
Poverty75%
Not poverty100%

Social Studies

All Students78%
Female81%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Not migrant78%
Poverty69%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Not migrant100%
Poverty100%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students92%
Female88%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible0%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Not migrant92%
Poverty93%
Not poverty90%

Math

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Not migrant98%
Poverty100%
Not poverty97%

Reading

All Students97%
Female96%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty96%
Not poverty97%

Social Studies

All Students93%
Female85%
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible0%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%
Poverty0%
Not poverty90%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 94% 58%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Black 2% 34%
Hispanic 1% 5%
Two or more races 1% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 54%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Bob J Hartwell
Fax number
  • (334) 897-5136

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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29256 Hwy 87
Jack, AL 36346
Website: Click here
Phone: (334) 897-6275

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