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GreatSchools Rating

Kitty Stone Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 841 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted October 1, 2013

A huge disappointment! I attended Jacksonville City School from kindergarten to 12th grade. I had no issues with it growing up, it was school. However when my child started attending Kitty Stone, it was a huge let down. He was repeatedly bullied and the staff at Jacksonville City Schools don't take bullying seriously, they treat it as "kids being kids", and I would go so far as to say that the elitist attitude in the Jacksonville's school system only fuels the bullying. We moved to the Weaver school district and my child, who used to beg me not to make him go to school, actually loves school now. Bullying is taken seriously and children are allowed to focus on learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2013

Kitty Stone Elementary School is certainly not the best Elementary School in this area. The leadership in administration is severly lacking. They are unorganized to say the least. The front office staff are among the rudest individuals I have ever encountered in a public educational institution. Parents are not valued as resources and are restricted from participating in the learning community. The teachers are OLD and need to retire. All you hear is be quiet and stop talking......sad to see what has happened to the educative process! Children should be excited about attending school. This school certainly has a prison like environment not conducive to the active learning process. Send your kids or grand kids to one of the Calhoun County schools that actually promote a positive learning atmosphere!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2012

My two children have been going to Kitty Stone less than a year and their progress has been amazing. We moved from a school in another state that was said to be the "best" around but we had a lot of catching up to do to be on the level with Kitty Stone! My son has gone from reading 20 words per minute to 60 in just 4 months! I can't say enough great things about these teachers and their love for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2009

This school goes above and beyond what I expected for my son. Great teachers, staff and friends.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2009

I have four kids who attend kitty stone and they love it. The teaching staff is great, thye care for their kids futures.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2009

Kitty Stone is an awesome school lead by the best principal!!! He loves the kids and the school and it is obvious. The staff goes above and beyond. I feel very confident with the education that my daughter is receiving at Kitty Stone. Too bad the high school can't follow the lead of Kitty Stone Elementary!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2008

I think that Kitty Stone is the best school because it has a wonderful facilty and staff. The teaching is way ahead of all the other schools in the area. THere are all kinds of exxtra things to do. A wonderful band program. With a 4-6th grade singing. And a 6th grade band. There are also amazing lunches with the kindest lunch ladies. It is the best school in the whole world!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 13, 2007

Advanced teaching techniques coupled with values. Caring staff and community. Known throughout the area as the premiere elementary school. Division I school that has an excellent education program aids in injecting new ideas and a steady flow of assistants bringing the student to teacher [ratio] way down.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2005

My child loves this school every year in the summer she is dying to find out who her teacher is and she has liked every single teacher shes had! She loves every thing about the school parents have so much involvment my child came home playing the flute. I was amazed at how good she was she even joined band!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2004

I have had at least one child at Kitty Stone Elementary for the past 10 years. My children have been blessed with excellent teachers who genuinely care for all children enrolled. Mrs. Kay Evans is an extra special kindergarten teacher!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2004

My son is in 1st grade at Kitty Stone Elementary. The quality of his education is top priority and I feel that Kitty Stone is a top-notch school with well educated and qualified teachers. Thumbs up for Ms. Jackson.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 14, 2004

My daugther is in second grade she has had three great teachers which have boosted her confidence in everything. She got off to a good start and I believe that is where it starts.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female76%
Male83%
Black59%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible66%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%
Poverty67%
Not poverty96%

Reading

All Students86%
Female85%
Male86%
Black74%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty80%
Not poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female95%
Male85%
Black87%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Poverty86%
Not poverty94%

Reading

All Students94%
Female98%
Male89%
Black90%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White95%
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Poverty90%
Not poverty98%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female94%
Male96%
Black95%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White95%
Free lunch eligible94%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty94%
Not poverty97%

Reading

All Students94%
Female97%
Male91%
Black91%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty92%
Not poverty97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female74%
Male81%
Black68%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White82%
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligible82%
Special education31%
General population84%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty71%
Not poverty86%

Reading

All Students89%
Female89%
Male90%
Black87%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White92%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligible82%
Special education46%
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty84%
Not poverty96%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students84%
Female84%
Male83%
Black74%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White88%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant84%
Poverty73%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 58%
Black 33% 34%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 57%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Sharon B Gaines
Fax number
  • (256) 782-5978

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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115 College St SW
Jacksonville, AL 36265
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 782-5191

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