Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Valley Jr High School

Public | PK-9

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

13 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2014

This school is decent aside from the extremely crooked and vindictive principal. I can assure you that if there is any good in this man, I sure haven't seen it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Wednesday, September 10, 2014

The teachers at this school might be great, but they're not worth putting up with the principal. I've never seen such an unfair and unkind educator.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2013

The principle is heartless in this school and holds personal vendettas against certain kids. He likes to punish kids without proof and allows other kids to harass kids with disabilities. He also allows teachers to write up students for there disability.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 12, 2009

January 8 2009 was one day of many. Perhaps the parent who posted that would understand if he/she knew all teachers were required to be at a board meeting downtown at 3:30 p.m. on that day. They were doing their job!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 22, 2009

As a former parent and current grandparent of children in this school, I can say with authority that Valley Jr. High School is one of the best in our county. The teachers and principal are hard working and care about the education of every child. My children are well-rounded adults that both received advanced college degrees. Their foundation for success began with their elementary years at Valley Jr. High School. I expect the same for my grandchildren. The caring faculty and high expecations for academic success have remained constant throughout the years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2008

As a parent of 2 students at Valley, I feel that there is no better school around. The academic standards are set high so that when you send your kids to school, they are getting the best education available. The only thing I would like to see is art and music classes made available, but for the resources that are available, the teachers at Valley far exceed what I expected as a parent. No school is perfect but this one comes close. My kids will have an adjustment leaving Valley for high school because it is such a closeknit environment where everyone cares for your child. Go Valley!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2008

Valley Jr. High has some fantastic teachers. I have two children who have attended valley all the way from k5 to 8th grade. I have a girl and a boy they have had different needs throughout their years at Valley and both have had their individual needs meet. I have one child with Dyslexia who has survived the much hated AR program at Valley and is a much stronger reader as a result. At times more effort has had to be put into helping the goal be reached but the staff at valley has always worked with me and my child to see the goals were meet. I am thankful to the staff at Valley Jr. High they are a great bunch.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2008

I was a former student of Valley Jr. High School and I must say that it is a fantastic school. The sports were always great, even though the other schools didn't respect us. Our academics were phenominal. When we would get a transer student, they could hardly catch up to what everyone else was learning. Most of the people are great too. But there are many stuck-up people. Also, parents: you and your child may not like the AR program, but it really helps. I hated it myself, but it's very useful. The teachers are amazing. You can talk to them like your own friends, and they try their very best to help you be on level with everyone else. All in all, I loved Valley. I wouldve changed a few things, but nothing worth it. I will miss it very much.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 15, 2008

I am a parent of 2 students who attend Valley. The level of education provided by the staff at Valley is second to none and all who are fortunate enough to attend receive the highest quality education around. The teachers display class and the utmost care for the students. There is no other school I would send my children to. Thanks for all you do teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2007

as an a plus student i have to say that valley is very disciplined and works hard to help every single child.the teachers get involved with the children so class is easier for kids and feel more comfortable around these people. during classes the teachers go around the class and help the children that arent catching as fast so everyone is on the same page.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 19, 2006

The teachers at Valley don't only care about stats but most of all they care about each individual child.. They are caring and gentle when it calls for it and firm also.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2006

I can speak very highly of the preschool at Valley. It is a special education classroom that is reverse mainstreamed (typical developing children are also in the class). My daughter has thrived/ excelled in this classroom as have many others. The student/ teacher ratio is aprx 3:1, the staff is qualified/ attentive/ energetic, the students are kept active and diligently work on the goals of the IEP. The typical developing students are taught to be compassionate, understanding and how to be friends with children that have special needs. There's a pavilion with modified/ customized playground equipment for children in wheelchairs. Students attend field trips/ are in plays and may also participate in the school pageant. Students work on the computer(which includes adaptions for children with visual impairment), with therapy equipment in the gym and inside the classroom. Physical/ occupational therapy is given everyday by the teachers/ speech 3X's/ wk...by the speech therapist. Phenomenal program, similar to Hand-in-Hand (in Birmingham). I strongly recommend! Please visit! Jen Moore, parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

The educators at this school seem to really care for the children, though I do not agree with the way I have heard some of them speak to large groups of children. It is a strict school, that seems to have had alot of problem children come through it. The instructors seem burnt out. While not all the staff is like this, the ones that are I feel ruin a non hostile environment for the children with social anxieties. Which is common for some elementary students.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students93%
Female100%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty0%

Reading

All Students95%
Female97%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible94%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty93%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female78%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty78%
Not poverty78%

Reading

All Students93%
Female100%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty96%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female94%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty91%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students96%
Female94%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant96%
Poverty94%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female96%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty92%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students95%
Female100%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty92%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female100%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible94%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty95%
Not poverty95%

Reading

All Students95%
Female96%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible97%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty95%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female94%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty91%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students89%
Female90%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty84%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Poverty100%
Not poverty0%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students91%
Female100%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible87%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Poverty89%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 91% 58%
Hispanic 5% 5%
Black 2% 34%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 61%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Thomas Harding Kacharos
Fax number
  • (205) 483-9509

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

155 Valley School Rd
Jasper, AL 35504
Website: Click here
Phone: (205) 483-9381

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT