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GreatSchools Rating

West Limestone High School

Public | K-12

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted December 15, 2013

I believe that ALL the issues with this school would be corrected with the removal of tenure. Most of these teachers are only there for holidays and summers off and the fact that they don't want to grow up. How much control do principles really have over the faculty when they know she can't do anything to them without an act of congress. The best thing I ever did for my kids was taking them somewhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2011

West Limestone High School is a wonderful school. I am proud to have been a Wildcat and am also proud to say my children are all Wildcats!!! I wouldn't want my children to go to school anywhere else in Limestone County. Principal Charlotte Craig is wonderful. She keeps her school in line, students as well as teachers. She is always willing to listen to parent's concerns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2008

West Limestone lets children fall through the cracks. No phone calls to parents when children are absent. They do however, call you in for a meeting after 8 missed days. By the rules in the books they are to call you at the first mised day and have a meeting at the 5th missed day. They, also put children who have learning dificulties in the hallway during class. What is this??? There is a law of no child left behind. If your child is fighting and teachers saw the fight start if they don't like your child he/she is the one that started it no matter that your child recieved medical attention due to a fight defending he/she. Schools are responsible for the saftey and well being of my child. They need to better comunicate with parents. If I had a choice for schools I sure would not choose this
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2008

I believe that only the negative on this school seems to be publicized. However this school is doing a fine job by educating the students. They have many honor graduates every year, won scholar bowl competitions around the state, and a good sports program. The teachers seem to go above and beyond for their student's education.


Posted January 4, 2007

Definitely need new leadership this school. Need to address tenured teacher issue.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2006

I believe that West Limestone is a great school. I think that alot of people do not give credit to the teachers that is due. There are some that go OUT of their way to see to it that the students are not only taught, but are also well taken care of. I think the principal does everything in his power to see to it that there is discipline- something that other schools do not have. It makes a difference when you know that your child attends a school where the main concern is learning. West Limestone was awarded the academic award for the county- I guess that did not make it to sound-off or the paper. Hats off to the students, teachers and administration! I only wish there were more participation in extracurricular areas from the teachers and students. West use to dominate the county in sports.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2006

I am currently a student at WLHS and have been for five years. I think that at West, there are a few motivated teachers who care about the students so much that it is unbelievable. However, in my opinion, I would not consider my school great in many ways. WLHS has a social scene that I know I would never want a child of mine to get into, believe me. It does have a great Agriculture department, however, with a wonderful teacher. I wouldn't call the math dept. great though. And alot of the kids are great. Mr. Davis is great too.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 3, 2006

Three years out of West Limestone High School, I feel that attending WLHS was a tremendous advantage to me. Once in college, I realized how much further along I was academically than most other students. I believe that the teachers taught valuable information that was not always covered in the textbooks. I also think the teachers have genuine concern for their students and their well-being.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted October 27, 2005

As a student at West Limstone I think it is a great school. We do not have as many crimes committed at our school as at the other Limestone County Schools. Our principals are strict but keep everyone in order. We have for the most part good teachers but of course we have our not-so-good teachers also.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 18, 2005

There is a strong bond between the children at this school, from K - 12. There are some excellent teachers but there are teachers who either don't have enough experience or aren't very motivated. Communication from some of the teachers is minimal. Mr. Davis is an excellent principal, in my opinion, and is trying to make changes for the better at the school. He is a disciplinarian and a rule enforcer, which is a great thing. I believe that over time, we'll see the overall quality improve with Mr. Davis' guidance.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2005

Good teachers that care about their students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2004

West Limestone has a lot of good teachers who do all they can to help the children. Some teachers will call you at work for very silly things though. Like, your child was talking in class, etc. (So tell her to be quiet)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2004

West Limestone High School is a good school with children that care about their classroom work and also very active about sports. I know that the school has a great staff, and are willing to help if its needed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2004

West Limestone High School is a small school with students in grades K-12. The class sizes are small and the students receive a lot of individualize instruction. The faculty and staff work well together and the administration cares a lot for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

47 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
51%

2009

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

47 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
74%

2009

 
 
84%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
73%

2009

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

37 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
87%

2009

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 91% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
69%

2009

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
80%

2009

 
 
87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

50 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
56%

2009

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

50 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
88%

2009

 
 
79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

123 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
53%

2009

 
 
43%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 86% in 2012.

123 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%

2009

 
 
78%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 79% in 2012.

112 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
79%

2009

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2012.

113 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
75%

2009

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female74%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Poverty87%
Non-poverty81%

Reading

All Students87%
Female74%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population87%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Poverty90%
Non-poverty81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female67%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White68%
Free lunch eligible42%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population71%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Poverty50%
Non-poverty78%

Reading

All Students86%
Female93%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible83%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population88%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Poverty86%
Non-poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students52%
Female61%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White52%
Free lunch eligible40%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population56%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Poverty41%
Non-poverty63%

Reading

All Students80%
Female91%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White80%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Poverty77%
Non-poverty83%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students46%
Female42%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White47%
Free lunch eligible45%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population47%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Poverty40%
Non-poverty52%

Reading

All Students74%
Female79%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White76%
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population77%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Poverty68%
Non-poverty80%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female56%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White59%
Free lunch eligible46%
Reduced lunch eligible83%
Special education25%
General population62%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Poverty52%
Non-poverty63%

Reading

All Students76%
Female82%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White77%
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special education38%
General population82%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty77%
Non-poverty76%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female80%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White79%
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligible77%
Special educationn/a
General population79%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant79%
Poverty73%
Non-poverty85%

Reading

All Students78%
Female85%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White79%
Free lunch eligible66%
Reduced lunch eligible92%
Special educationn/a
General population79%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Poverty72%
Non-poverty85%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 80% in 2012.

42 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
60%

2009

 
 
43%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2012.

116 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
60%

2009

 
 
65%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students52%
Female63%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White52%
Free lunch eligible41%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population59%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Poverty37%
Non-poverty65%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students48%
Female44%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White52%
Free lunch eligible38%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education13%
General population54%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Poverty43%
Non-poverty55%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2012.

95 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
97%
Language

The state average for Language was 75% in 2012.

95 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
88%

2009

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

96 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%

2009

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2012.

95 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
84%

2009

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2009.

2009

 
 
n/a
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 71% in 2012.

96 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
77%

2009

 
 
89%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2012.

119 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Language

The state average for Language was 90% in 2012.

119 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%

2009

 
 
95%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2012.

119 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2012.

119 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 94% in 2009.

80 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
95%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 90% in 2012.

119 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
96%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students96%
Female98%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%
Poverty93%
Non-poverty98%

Language

All Students81%
Female80%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White83%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population89%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Poverty69%
Non-poverty91%

Math

All Students82%
Female84%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White83%
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population87%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Poverty74%
Non-poverty89%

Reading

All Students82%
Female80%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population91%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Poverty71%
Non-poverty91%

Social Studies

All Students76%
Female73%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White76%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population84%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty67%
Non-poverty83%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White99%
Free lunch eligible97%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population99%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Poverty98%
Non-poverty100%

Language

All Students93%
Female97%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Poverty87%
Non-poverty97%

Math

All Students97%
Female97%
Male98%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Poverty96%
Non-poverty99%

Reading

All Students95%
Female97%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Poverty91%
Non-poverty97%

Social Studies

All Students93%
Female92%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Poverty87%
Non-poverty97%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 92% 58%
Hispanic 5% 5%
Black 2% 34%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 50%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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10945 School House Rd
Lester, AL 35647
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 233-6687

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