Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Moulton Middle School

Public | 4-8 | 586 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

17 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted December 28, 2012

My name is Marcus Cooky and i went to Moulton Elementary school in i believe 1999 and then moved back to IL..... I was wondering if there was any way i can get an old yearbook and how would i go about this process? Thank you


Posted July 26, 2012

I am a student at MMS and personally i think its a wonderful school . I will be going into the 8th grade and i am very excited to work with the teachers . After reading some of the previous comments i see how far we've come and how truely blessed we are . We have a new building , wonderful library , band , show chior , basketball for girls and boys , football , cheerleading , volleyball , and dance team . We also participate in Robotics and have a year book staff . I have loved every year at Moulton Middle and will miss it when i leave for high school .


Posted March 25, 2009

The only thing that I am concerned about as a parent is that the cost of some things in the school are rediculous. I know that this is a small town and some funding that bigger schools have may not be available to us. However, I have never had to spend the kind of money for my kids to attend a school than I have for MES, MMS or LCHS. My kids came from a school not too much bigger than here and never had to pay crazy fees as we are expected to do for Moulton. Furthermore, I feel as though we are living in 'Mayberry' as far as being behind the times (technologically speaking), but some people seem to think that the costs for some events/sports need to be like those of a huge school. Get it together and decide which it is!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 15, 2008

Don't listen to the bad reviews. MMS is a great school, with great faculty and staff. We DO have electricity, and we use technology regularly in class. I love MMS and I'm gonna miss it next year when I leave for 8th grade.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 16, 2008

I think MMS is a wonderful school. Compared to other schools in the county, they do a wonderful job of preparing students for current as well as future needs. The choir shows are wonderful, but what happened to 5th grade band? My child is currently attending the summer program at MMS and is enjoying the classes while actively learning skills that will help her in the fall. My hat is off to the teachers and principal for a job well done!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2008

I am a parent of a fourth grade student at MMS. I had read reviews and was concerned about technology. I see something completely different. The computer lab is up-to-date and used frequently. I believe most of the teachers are using projection systems in their classrooms. My child's teacher has remote control devices the students use in their lessons to put in answers so she can check their understanding. The teacher also has a wireless pad she uses for presentations and in place of the old blackboard. I have heard they are getting a wireless mobile lab. I think this school is one of the best in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2007

MMS is the best in Lawrence County. Check out those test scores! They are definitely doing some great things at this school. The academics are excellent. Choir is thriving but band is sinking lower and lower. Some sports are available for 7th graders. I see a lot of parents eating in the lunchroom, as I'm there often.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2006

The quality of the academic programs at MMS is top notch. Music and art are not available to all students, however. Moulton Park and Rec offers sports for all, but little extracurricular activities are offered by the school. I think parent involvement has increased, primarily because of a real working PTO and the excellent leadership provided by the administration during the last two years. MMS desperately needs a new building, not the current high school building. Parents, teachers, and community leaders need to speak out loud and clear on this issue!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2006

I have had three children to attend MMS. I have been very pleased with the overall academic achievement of the school. Due to the lack of funding and financial support the teachers and administration I feel do an adequate job in providing a great educational facility. An overall outlook of test scores can be deceiving due to the population of diverse students. However, thanks to the hard work of the students and faculty those scores have improved tremendously. Before presenting judgmental statements I encourage parents and those in the community to visit the school and become involved to see for yourself what kind of school Moulton Middle School has become. A Parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 19, 2006

Moulton Middle is an exceptional school. The teachers and administration at Moulton Middle really care about the students and their education. The teachers go above and beyond the call of duty to make learning fun. The new administration has caused morale to improve greatly. Scores are up too! I highly recommend this school for anyone seeking a quality education.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 19, 2006

No one likes to think that they are perceived as being slack in his or her job, or, heaven forbid, that they hate children. Personally, I love 'my' children and enjoy teaching them. The staff I work with could all be working in different capacities, so, I feel they must enjoy their job as well. There are times that my job is more difficult at times than others, especially when outside factors influence the ability of the students to think and learn. Our administration is very supportive of its teachers, but not of those who are slack in doing their jobs. Excellence and professionalism is expected. I am sorry people are unhappy. Please don't judge the entire school based on the opinions of a few. We need to be part of a team to achieve excellence. Excellence takes growth and hard work. We need your support at school and home. SH
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 18, 2006

I have had three children at MMS. I believe the school is excellent, but I'm concerned about the fact that there has not been a computer lab for the last couple of years and that the band program is falling apart. When MMS had it's own band director, the band program thrived at the middle school and at the high school. 6th grade isn't even offered band this semester and I think it's very sad. Music has been shown to improve grades, so why has the music program been cut?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2006

I believe MMS is a great school, and has improved tremendously in the past two years. Compared to other schools in our county, MMS offers many extra programs and opportunities. The teachers challenge the students, and they do require them to behave. That is what creates a good learning environment. If we want our children to learn, we can't expect them to get to talk all day. They need discipline, maybe even more than they receive. This school is climbing the educational ladder, and doing well with the resources that they have. I wouldn't want my child to go to any other school in the county. If you want your child to learn, MMS is an excellent school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2006

I am a teacher at MMS. Expectations for learning are very high here. Our administrators have high expectations for teachers as well. Recently, our school received a monetary award for raising test scores from the State of Alabama. Parents are encouraged to come to MMS and see what their children are learning. A few parents accept the invitation and typically leave pleased with what they see and return often to offer help. Our school offers band, music, (including several choirs) and many service organizations in which students can participate. Both of my sons were educated at MMS and left with high test scores. I am confident they received a high quality education while at MMS. They learned study skills while at MMS while participating in extra-curricular activities. While the buildings at MMS do need replacement the commitment of the teachers and staff at MMS never grows old.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 11, 2006

I am very pleased with the performance of this school, especially under the new leadership. The school is structured and expectations are high. My child scored all 4s on his ARMT and scored in the high 90s on the Stanford. MMS is one of the only schools in the county to offer band and music for middle school students. The old buildings need to be replaced. The cleanliness of the campus improved tremendously last year. The staff and curriculum are great.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 14, 2006

Do not send your kids to this school it is a bad decision. If you send your kids to this school they will not learn anything.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 1, 2005

I wish I had some insite on this school before moving here..we would have located elsewhere. I have had 3 kids in MMS, Thankfully 2 are out of there already, and the other one is beginning to hate school. That is sad. What is happening in our schools? Children should enjoy going to school. Instead it is like walking into a military school everyday. It seems like they took talking completely out of school. They are kids give them a break. They are only small for a little while. Lets get the teachers (a few)off their cell phones and the computers while teaching a class...kids learn what the see. Some teachers here do not seem to even like kids...why are they here?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students83%
Female91%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native81%
White88%
Free lunch eligible78%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special education38%
General population89%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty81%
Not poverty88%

Reading

All Students83%
Female92%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native94%
White86%
Free lunch eligible78%
Reduced lunch eligible92%
Special education42%
General population88%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty80%
Not poverty90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female83%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native93%
White74%
Free lunch eligible68%
Reduced lunch eligible64%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant75%
Poverty67%
Not poverty86%

Reading

All Students91%
Female98%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native0%
White90%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligible100%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Poverty90%
Not poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female64%
Male56%
Black54%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native58%
White61%
Free lunch eligible49%
Reduced lunch eligible61%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Poverty52%
Not poverty72%

Reading

All Students90%
Female96%
Male85%
Black69%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native100%
White92%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligible94%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Poverty87%
Not poverty97%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female90%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native91%
White85%
Free lunch eligible78%
Reduced lunch eligible93%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant85%
Poverty81%
Not poverty92%

Reading

All Students86%
Female91%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native100%
White85%
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligible79%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty81%
Not poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students83%
Female91%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native88%
White89%
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligible92%
Special education31%
General population89%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty79%
Not poverty90%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students73%
Female77%
Male68%
Black69%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Native67%
White74%
Free lunch eligible68%
Reduced lunch eligible78%
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrantn/a
Poverty70%
Not poverty78%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 86% 58%
American Indian/Alaska Native 8% 1%
Black 4% 34%
Hispanic 2% 5%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 57%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Gaylon Michae Parker
Fax number
  • (256) 905-2481

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

364 Main St
Moulton, AL 35650
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 905-2460

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT