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GreatSchools Rating

Horseshoe Bend High School

Public | K-12

 

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Community Rating

3 stars

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2014:
No new ratings
2013:
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2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
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23 reviews of this school


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Posted February 22, 2012

HBS is a great school! The Principal is a hard working person dedicated to the success of his students and school. I love the new baseball uniforms for this year. Students leave HBS ready for college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2010

Horseshoe Bend is a SACS accredited school, which means that it DOES, in fact, offer many programs and courses to get our students ready for college. We could not have achieved SACS accreditation without offering quality programs and showing evidence of student success. Maybe you weren't ready for college for some other reason.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 4, 2009

As a senior student at Horseshoe Bend, I can honestly say that I am proud to be a General. The teachers all know their students by their first name and genuinely care about the well-being of the students. Learning is the most important thing at this school, not the extra curricular activites. The students are also, for the majority, polite and helpful individuals. Yes, the dress code is a bit harsh, but it is not very hard to abide by. Also, parents and students should keep in mind that the dress code for 2009-2010 was not chosen by the school or the principle; it is a county mandated dress code that stemmed directly from the superintendant. The small school atmostphere allows students to form almost family like bonds. My children will definietly attend this school if my life and job allow me to stay in New Site. Go Generals!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 17, 2009

I went from HBHS kindergarden-9th grade, and now I am being forced to go back for my senior year, and after attending two other highschools and I can proudly say Horseshoe Bend is NOT A GOOD SCHOOL. They are so behind with everything. I will be behind my first year in college because of classes Horseshoe Bend does not offer students. I know it's a small school, but they could figure something out. And as for a dress code, I think if the school I went to with over 4,000 kids could handle us with NO DRESS CODE then a small school like this could handle it AS WELL.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 30, 2008

Horseshoe Bend has always strived to offer its students the best opportunities that it could. Some of the students are overlooking the fact that educational values should always come before fashion statements. I am proud our school choose to enforce a dress code that makes our students accountable for the way they dress. What most students don't realize is that the Student Council approved the dress code. It was not entirely the administration that came up with this idea. Parents were also surveyed before the dress code came into effect.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2008

I am a student at HBHS and i would love to say that it is a very great school. we have the best sport programs and the best teachers there. the only problem at HBHS is the Dress Code. how are we able to express ourselves with just plain clothing or a horseshoe bend shirt. If you want less people complaining about the dress code then let us wear any kind of shirt but it still has to be apporiate with no violence, language, drugs and ect. if they let us wear whatever we want but still no cleavage or back showing i think that HBHS would be a school less talked about.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 16, 2008

I attended this school since i was in 1st grade and i am now in 11th grade, i have recently moved to Sylacauga where i attend B.B Comer now. I have to i seriously miss HBHS, I also want to say that the teachers at HBHS are very down to earth and helpful , and some of the students there we very polite. I wish so much that i didnt leave HBHS, i had very many friends, not just students but teacher's also. I was a parent i would recommend that my child would go to this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 15, 2008

A lot of people are saying that HBHS is a great school to send their children, but I would definitely disagree. I attended HBHS as a student and I have actually been out in the real world. I would like to let you know that HBHS is behind in education. They do not have the same educational standards as a lot of schools. I went to college outside of Alabama and I was behind a lot. I felt that this school let me down tremendously.


Posted November 3, 2007

HBHS is a home to me that I would never want to leave. Out of the many Schools in Tallapoosa County I would say HBHS is the best! What makes it be my favorite is that it is small and every student gets more one on one with the teacher. I am quite surprised on the negative things people are saying about this school. Drugs, Bulling, and little other things but all that stuff rarely happens at our school. plus you find all these things at other schools too not just us. For a small school like us you don't have to be a pro baseball player or basketball player to play any sports. Plus there's alot organizations to participate in a small school like ours. Because of these things I support Horsehoe Bend and love it!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 16, 2007

I am a former student of HBHS and I recently moved to Georgia, but if I had to choose any school I would always choose HBHS. The teachers are great and yes tht is now a really strict dress code but who cares about the dress what the parents and former students need to know is that Horseshoe Bend is a great and wonderful school. I love all the years i spent there and ain't ashamed to say yes i attened HBHS for almost my whole life and if I could go back in time I would still choose HBHS over in of the schools in Tallapoosa County. So for all of the former students that are putting Horseshoe Bend down, you could have choosen a different school you did not have to go to HBHS if you did not like it so much. oh yeah one more thing. Go Generals!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 9, 2007

My Grandchildren attend this school and I believe that Horseshoe Bend School will one day be a Great School to attend.With Proper Leadership we will achieve great things.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2007

Horseshoe Bend is not perfect nor is any school you may choose to walk into. They have received SACS Accreditation and they are striving to improve all areas of weaknesses that were recognized. The teachers work hard every day to acknowledge the learning styles of every child and to help each student succeed. HBS welcomes any parent who comes in to volunteer. They do not play favorites with this idea because any school can use good volunteers. HBS has never claimed to be perfect, but they are striving to help every child that enters its doors to become SOMEBODY. If parents have a problem with that, let them take their child somewhere else.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 18, 2006

I have been going to horseshoe bend [since] I was in kindergatern. My plans are to always go to HBHS! There are alot of friendly teachers and stundents. But a strict dress code. If i had to pick any school, yes, i would pick Horseshoe Bend High!! We have great school lunches and great snack choices. HBHS has alot of extracurricular activites like: football, volleyball cheerleading, softball, and baseball.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 21, 2006

I have been attending HBHS since I was in the 3rd grade and I honestly have no regrets about being about of HBHS school. I believe HBHS is a well rounded school. It has a very safe and also a very clean environment. I also feel that the negative feedback coming from random people are from people who do not put themselves out there. It does not matter what school you attend you are going to be surrounded by the group situations. I feel at HBHS there are no popular groups only the people who actually get involved with the school are more noticed because of their evolvement. There are a variety of people who come to HBHS not a one being alike and I think that HBHS has a very welcoming environment and I am grateful for the friends I have made over the past years. Thanks HBHS!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 10, 2006

Horseshoe Bend is a great school! Especially compared to the other alternatives. I graduated from HBHS in 96 and my children also attended this school. I now homeschool my children but if I had to send them back to a public school, it would definately be Horseshoe Bend.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 20, 2006

Horseshoe Bend is a Great over all school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 19, 2006

I am a current student at HBHS and this school is great. I disagree with the negative people on this site.I have been going to this school every since 1995 and the only people who don't like this school are people with negative attitudes about everything. I love HBHS. GO GENERALS.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 10, 2006

My kids have been going to this school since it first opened and I have no regrets at all for sending them here. It is a great school with fine teachers and good opportunities. I would advise anyone to send their child here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2005

I am shocked to see all the negative feedback on HBHS ! As a parent I believe that it is a good school and I like the way that the children get alot of one on one attention. My children are proud to be a part of HBHS. Beverly Nickolson
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2005

I agree with Ashley, Horseshoe Bend is not one of the better schools you can pick to send your child. The teachers do have their favorites. Parential involvement is at a low unless you are one of the 'popular' students and you wish to recieve the same praise and attention as you child or as the one mystery writer wrote do things to 'just be seen'. From the 3 years I spent at Horseshoe Bend, I can honestly say that my children will never attend that school.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students28%
Female32%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible18%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant28%
Poverty16%
Not poverty45%

Reading

All Students65%
Female75%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible50%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant65%
Poverty50%
Not poverty86%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female65%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant62%
Poverty60%
Not poverty65%

Reading

All Students89%
Female91%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty86%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female89%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty88%
Not poverty95%

Reading

All Students88%
Female89%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty88%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female93%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education64%
General population95%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty88%
Not poverty93%

Reading

All Students86%
Female93%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education50%
General population94%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty82%
Not poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female55%
Male45%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible30%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant50%
Poverty33%
Not poverty73%

Reading

All Students87%
Female90%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Poverty78%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female60%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible48%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education25%
General population65%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant57%
Poverty53%
Not poverty65%

Reading

All Students72%
Female90%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible64%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education33%
General population82%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant72%
Poverty63%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students88%
Female89%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty84%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students53%
Female58%
Male48%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible27%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant53%
Poverty39%
Not poverty73%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
97%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
83%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
76%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
79%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Not migrant100%
Poverty100%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students81%
Female0%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Not migrant81%
Poverty73%
Not poverty87%

Math

All Students85%
Female95%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Not migrant85%
Poverty77%
Not poverty90%

Reading

All Students86%
Female91%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible70%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English86%
Not migrant86%
Poverty71%
Not poverty97%

Social Studies

All Students81%
Female86%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Not migrant81%
Poverty73%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students96%
Female94%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White98%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education82%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English96%
Not migrant96%
Poverty97%
Not poverty95%

Language

All Students88%
Female94%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education55%
General population0%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Not migrant88%
Poverty83%
Not poverty0%

Math

All Students87%
Female88%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White85%
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education45%
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Not migrant87%
Poverty83%
Not poverty91%

Reading

All Students92%
Female94%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White95%
Free lunch eligible86%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education64%
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Not migrant92%
Poverty90%
Not poverty95%

Social Studies

All Students83%
Female65%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White83%
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education45%
General population93%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Not migrant83%
Poverty87%
Not poverty77%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 88% 58%
Black 8% 34%
Hispanic 2% 5%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 57%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Casey D Davis
Fax number
  • (256) 329-9119

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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10684 Hwy 22 East
New Site, AL 36256
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 329-9110

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