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GreatSchools Rating

Reeltown High School

Public | K-12 | 772 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted August 9, 2013

i love reeltown(: I am student and I highly enjoy it(: I used to go to Dadeville, but the beliefs of the staff there were VERRY distasteful.... I love Reeltown though!(: not only are a majority of the teachers Christians, they believe in you and help you strive to become more than you expect of yourself(: I agree it could approve of taking less attention off of sports and the players but it is also leveled with excellent academics(: G REBELS(: -class of 2015


Posted May 9, 2013

Reeltown is a great school. My family moved into the community and felt very welcome at the school. I have no doubts about my children's safety and the quality of education is outstanding. The teachers seem to genuinely care about the education of the students and the staff and leadership do a good job of keeping the school disciplined and focused.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2012

Our daughter recently transferred to Reeltown High School. To date, we are highly impressed with the faculty and the school facility. She comes home everyday happy and excited to go back the next day. We are so glad we made the move and would recommend this school to anyone in the Tallapoosa County district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2010

Reeltown is an awesome place to educate your kids...and mine. I went 12 yrs and both my kids attend. They are very involved and smart. The closeness of the community provides a sense of family. We are a pride filled school/community that I'm very glad I am part of as well as my kids. I'd recommend it to anyone!!!:) GO REBELS
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

My 3 children and 2 grandchildren all graduated from here. My 3 children are all in the medical feild and my 2 grandchildren are in college preparing for extended degrees. I can site you numerous former graduates that have done very well in life both educationally and financially. All from a small 1A school that has now moved up to 2A classification.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

I love Reeltown High School because it has been a wonderful part of my life. I attended for 12 years; my two daughters both graduated there; and now my granddaughter is in the 5th grade. Our school is the nucleus of our community. Faculty and students are members of area churches and other organizations. We all interact in a close relationship that cultivates good will and harmony for all. I am very proud to be part of Reeltown High School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2008

I am a Reeltown Alumni and I have children attending in the high school and the upper elementary. I would like to praise Tom Cochran and his staff for the improvement of the dress code, discipline, and just the all around appearance of the school. The teachers are in their place..with his help now the students can learn ......Great Job and continue the great work!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2008

I used to go to that school and i tink it is a great school and you should send our kids to that school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 21, 2008

Reeltown is a wonderful school. Everyone has the right to an opinion, but some of the negative reviews posted on this website are very untrue. The teachers do offer alot for the students. They are caring and work at keeping their classroom organized and the dicipline level fair and consistent. I have found the car rider area to be very safe for the students, no problems at all. Also to me this school has a great since of family to it, unlike larger schools. This year has brought about alot of changes at Reeltown and I can honestly say our school is a positive asset to this community and to the surrounding communities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2008

I love this alsome great excellent loving school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 3, 2008

Reeltown School is a quality rural school with a faculty that cares about each student. However, the recent loss of longtime assistant principal Mr. Mask and Coach Hammonds really hurt.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2006

True, the teachers were great. Several of the best teachers have left, and only a small few of teachers who are impartial and can be trusted remain. Children are being bullied for being 'different' from the majority of the kids, and the principal isn't doing anything about it. They simply aren't going about it the right way anymore! People tell the school to increase discipline, they punish EVERYBODY! Not just the 'bad' kids! And the lunchroom... the lunchroom workers are nice, but the kids don't have much choice. If you're kid is allergic to fish, you better pack him a lunch, because he'll starve!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2006

I am a teacher at RHS. I have not only taught here for 12 years but also graduated from RHS and went on to earn 1 undergrad degree as well as 2 graduate degrees from Auburn University. I feel that RHS prepares it's students to be competative citizens in the world of business as well as in the world of education. I am proud of our school and the teachers who strive everyday to bring a good, well rounded education to the students at RHS. Students with special needs are served with excellence and have every opportunity to thrive in academics as well as sports. It is my hope that parents will become more involved at RHS and ecourage their children to always do their best. It is a fact that you can only teach a student who wants to learn. I hope that every parents wants this for their child!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 8, 2006

This school has been pretty well kept over my years of matriculation. I always wished thst the school was bigger, but I realized that with its smaller size, I wasn't just a number, I was a student who was treated with respect. I did enjoy my stay at RHS. I have many memories, but I have to say that this school has only small problems that could easily be fixed.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 31, 2006

this school is so very disorganized in welcoming new families to the community. We didnt receive any information on school closures, holidays, teacher workshops, or programs offered by this school for my children. the car line is very unsafe, the teachers or aides do not even attempt to help the children in or out of the cars, and children are running thru the parking lot while cars are coming and going without supervision. I have found no 'open arms' policy with the teachers, students, or other parents. I have yet to be invited to a school function to even begin to interact with other parents. I have had to take my children off the bus only after 3 months of school, due to the violence of the children. I am considering moving my kids to Tallasee, with hopes of fiding something better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2005

this school needs to think more on all the kids and their needs and not just the football team and basketball team. kids are being left behind because the school don't know how to deal with kids with special needs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2003

This school still embraces old fashioned values! Its just great.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female82%
Male69%
Black71%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White76%
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant75%
Poverty69%
Not poverty84%

Reading

All Students78%
Female86%
Male75%
Black59%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White87%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty72%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female68%
Male65%
Black50%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White74%
Free lunch eligible56%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant67%
Poverty58%
Not poverty84%

Reading

All Students93%
Female94%
Male92%
Black89%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White95%
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty89%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female100%
Male90%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female100%
Male83%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female68%
Male71%
Black57%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White79%
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant70%
Poverty68%
Not poverty73%

Reading

All Students84%
Female86%
Male81%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant84%
Poverty82%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female83%
Male88%
Black67%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible79%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant85%
Poverty81%
Not poverty91%

Reading

All Students87%
Female90%
Male82%
Black67%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible79%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant87%
Poverty81%
Not poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female97%
Male89%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible87%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant92%
Poverty88%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students76%
Female87%
Male66%
Black64%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White80%
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant76%
Poverty70%
Not poverty87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students65%
Female71%
Male59%
Black50%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White76%
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant65%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students63%
Female68%
Male56%
Black33%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White72%
Free lunch eligible51%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant63%
Poverty55%
Not poverty73%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
90%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
88%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
97%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students93%
Female96%
Male90%
Black0%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%
Poverty94%
Not poverty91%

Language

All Students75%
Female88%
Male63%
Black64%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White77%
Free lunch eligible63%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Not migrant75%
Poverty66%
Not poverty87%

Math

All Students91%
Female92%
Male90%
Black82%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible87%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Not migrant91%
Poverty88%
Not poverty96%

Reading

All Students82%
Female88%
Male77%
Black82%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White82%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English82%
Not migrant82%
Poverty81%
Not poverty83%

Social Studies

All Students67%
Female64%
Male70%
Black45%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White73%
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English67%
Not migrant67%
Poverty63%
Not poverty74%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students97%
Female100%
Male94%
Black96%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White98%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English97%
Not migrant97%
Poverty98%
Not poverty96%

Language

All Students84%
Female89%
Male79%
Black76%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White88%
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Not migrant84%
Poverty84%
Not poverty84%

Math

All Students93%
Female94%
Male91%
Black96%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible95%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty96%

Reading

All Students91%
Female94%
Male88%
Black92%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White91%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English91%
Not migrant91%
Poverty91%
Not poverty92%

Social Studies

All Students75%
Female80%
Male70%
Black60%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Not migrant75%
Poverty77%
Not poverty72%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 58%
Black 30% 34%
Hispanic 2% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 68%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Thomas M Cochran
Fax number
  • (334) 257-3978

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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4085 Al Hwy 120
Notasulga, AL 36866
Website: Click here
Phone: (334) 257-3784

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