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GreatSchools Rating

Joseph W Lisenby Elementary School

Public | 1-5 | 372 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
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Teacher quality

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted January 9, 2013

Lisenby was slowly becoming a better school, but under its new leadership, it has quickly declined. It has become the most unwelcoming school we have ever been a part of. Parents are discouraged from coming to the school. Even told that they can not enter the school. Volunteers are not wanted. The school has turned into a prison. Police are also called on some of the children there. Poor leadership would be an understatement for this school. There are some wonderful teachers there, but they are being brought down by the new principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2009

Wonderful, nurturing, learning enovironment!!! The staff is top notch, and strives to stretch the children to their maximum potential. The adminstration is readily available to assist parents and form partnerships to meet the childrens physical, emotional, and developmental needs. The PTO ( Parent, Teacher, Organization) is very active in providing support for our school needs. We love Lisenby School!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2008

Lisenby Elementary is slowing but surely improving. There are those teachers that go above and beyond what they are supposed to do and there are those who do not. Hopefully, someday Lisenby will be just as wonderful for everyone, as you speak of in the review below. As a whole, Lisenby is just not quite there yet, but there are certainly some wonderful individual classrooms.


Posted November 16, 2008

This school is a wonderful place for children. The teachers are loving and caring. Three of our children attended Lisenby several years ago and they received everything they needed to be successful adults. The faculty and staff are highly qualified and they want the best for each and every child. Check out Lisenby School.


Posted August 20, 2008

It is wothout doubt that most any public school or school system has its downfall; Lisemby and the Ozark School System are no exception. We had 2children at Lisemby last year (4th & 5th), and one this year (5th). Our current 5th grader is in the TAG program, which is great for him because it keeps him interested in the education process...for the most part. The problem lies in that he excells in some areas and is now lacking in Math b/c they will not drop his Math level down one without upsetting his other schedule. Or so this was told by one and yet another story by another, both Lisenby educators. I feel that public schools are doing their fair amount for 'special needs' children. Current laws require these children's needs be met and no such laws for any other type of student or programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2008

We have to respectfully disagree when we say Lisenby is not catered toward the 'special needs' children and we speak from personal experience. It has taken years, the special education laws, outside help, parent involvement, and more to get our 'special needs' child started on the road to an appropriate education. It should not have been this hard, but unfortunately it was and is for so many other students and their parents. We have no doubt that some children are falling grossly behind...both 'special needs' and regular education students, ours included. On a positive note, there are some very dedicated, loving, good teachers at Lisenby, but there are some that lack in many areas. There is a definite need for improvement at Lisenby and with the Ozark City Schools all together, the Superintendent's office included.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2008

Thats just it..everything is catered to 'special needs' in this school. My daughter didn't have special needs and in fact, she was falling grossly behind at Lisenby. It wasn't until we decided to go with the Abeka program that I realized how behind she was. Luckily we caught on quick and changed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2008

My Step daughter is a special needs child that has made huge progress since attending Lisenby. She now makes A's in spelling and many other subjects. She loves her teachers...they have made a real difference in her life. Thank you!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2008

Fabulous school! Safe environment, friendly and caring staff! Learning abounds!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2008

Great school. Nice country setting.Small town values.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female93%
Male88%
Black83%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty86%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students92%
Female89%
Male94%
Black87%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant92%
Poverty88%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female92%
Male81%
Black81%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible83%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant89%
Poverty84%
Not poverty96%

Reading

All Students93%
Female96%
Male86%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty89%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female96%
Male95%
Black91%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty93%
Not poverty95%

Reading

All Students93%
Female88%
Male98%
Black91%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students92%
Female88%
Male95%
Black86%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant92%
Poverty89%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 49% 34%
White 47% 58%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 1%
Hispanic 2% 5%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 73%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Jaann Amenda Wells
Fax number
  • (334) 774-4960

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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860 Faust Ave
Ozark, AL 36360
Website: Click here
Phone: (334) 774-4919

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