Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Summerdale School

Public | PK-9

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

12 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted Friday, September 12, 2014

I am saddened by the comment questioning the great things that are going on at Summerdale. Leader in Me is not a "program".The Leader in Me is a process for teaching students personal leadership and 21st century life skills, such as goal setting, time management, teamwork, problem solving, respecting diversity, and life balance. The process: develops the whole child and sees each child as having unique gifts is founded on The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and other proven leadership principles and tools creates a sustainable, safe-and-friendly school culture provides world-class professional development for teachers and administrators increases parents satisfaction and involvement is implemented in a way that teachers do not see it as one more thing, but as a better way of doing what they were already doing impacts students of diverse backgrounds, regardless of race, intelligence, or economic upbringing
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 11, 2014

I have concerns about a school that takes it's grant money and gives $50K+ to a self-help guru to implement a program that has no history of improving academic performance or reducing disciplinary problems. This school needs a fence around the playground, repairs and upgrades of of equipment and fixtures and much more.


Posted October 30, 2009

It's a great school, we are family
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2008

Summerdale is a great school and offers some activities for thier students.There could be a few more none contact sports offered.My daughter attend this school and is now in high school.My son attends now and is in 6th grade. The school needs to work on teacher attidudes they have towards students and crack down on unruly children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2007

Both of my children attend Summerdale School. They have a new principal and assistant principal this year and they are extremely professional and kind. The K-2 teachers are so caring ( my children are in K and 2, so I am familiar with their teaching methods). All the faculty and staff are welcoming and friendly. It is like a little treasure that few people know about and I could not imagine my children attending school anywhere but at Summerdale.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2007

My child has left summerdale and is going into her junior year at foley next year. I was glad to hear ms battle returned. She runs an excellent program that grows year by year. She keeps the kids and the teachers in line and really cares about what she's doing. My child is now in honor society and excelling at a rapid pace thanks to the background she got at Summerdale. I highly recommend this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2006

I am not a parent of a student that goes to Summerdale, but I went to Summerdale for elementary school. I am a senior at Robertsdale now and I think that Summerdale has come a LONG way since I left. I have 2 sisters and 1 brother there now and they love it. 1 of my sisters is a cheerleader and my other siblings want to play softball and football. The school ahs grown so much these last few years and I think that it will continue to grow because of all the support that the town gives the school.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 24, 2006

We need a gym for our school. The middle school needs a place to practice and the elementary school needs a place to play on rainy day. Travis Townsend
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2005

We got 1 son in the second grade now, he has come along way, and on the road to do good, Summerdale has been very good for him, he likes it and Loves his teachers and faculty there, He is not a very out spoken child to adults, but they are working on helping us with that, as long as he is happy there and learning everything he can , we are very happy and pleased with the school, Keep up the good work Yall!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2005

I have 3 children who attend Summerdale School and I think it is Great! I have 2 about to be in 3rd grade and an 8th Grader. They have added many new and improved programs for all students and they add more and more each year. The teachers are all very nice and very helpful. Academic's are very important and they insure thet your child gets every thing he/she needs. You couldn't ask for a better school or staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2004

I think Summerdale has the best school. I have 3 children that go there. It is like your own private school. Everyone knows everybody and I really feel like my children are safe there. Their safety is very important to me. The teachers I have encountered seem to really care about their students. I do feel they need more activities but they are working on that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2004

This school needs more student activites. Especially in their new middle school. They need more sports and clubs. They also need a gym for their middle schoolers because I feel their pain for having that small cramped old gym thats probably about to fall into pieces. They need to lay low and have not so many rules about their uniforms.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female67%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White74%
Free lunch eligible51%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education29%
General population71%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant62%
Poverty53%
Not poverty83%

Reading

All Students78%
Female83%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special education29%
General population92%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant78%
Poverty72%
Not poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female71%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White83%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant82%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a

Reading

All Students88%
Female82%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible85%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Povertyn/a
Not povertyn/a
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female95%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Poverty97%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students95%
Female95%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant95%
Poverty94%
Not poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female84%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White80%
Free lunch eligible78%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant79%
Poverty76%
Not poverty92%

Reading

All Students90%
Female100%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant90%
Poverty89%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female87%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible68%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant70%
Poverty67%
Not poverty79%

Reading

All Students79%
Female93%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant79%
Poverty79%
Not poverty79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female88%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant86%
Poverty84%
Not poverty88%

Reading

All Students84%
Female96%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant84%
Poverty78%
Not poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students98%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Poverty97%
Not poverty0%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students81%
Female87%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Not migrant81%
Poverty79%
Not poverty86%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 80% 58%
Hispanic 10% 5%
Black 9% 34%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 67%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Mark P Pumphrey
Fax number
  • (251) 989-6611

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

400 East Broadway
Summerdale, AL 36580
Website: Click here
Phone: (251) 989-6850

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools




St. Patrick School
Robertsdale, AL



Magnolia School
Foley, AL


ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT