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GreatSchools Rating

Fayetteville High School

Public | K-12 | 641 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted January 23, 2014

I've attended Fayetteville since Kindergarten, and I would hope my kids could go to a school like this one day. The teachers are nice, and they spend their time to make sure you can understand what you're learning, and the athletic program is great. I feel like I'm part of a big family that looks out for one another. If you're considering Fayetteville, you are on the right path. I'm a proud student of this great school.


Posted June 21, 2011

I attended this school from the sixth grade through graduation, and I am astounded that it received such a great rating. The course options were the most basic available; if your child needs special education or gifted education, seek out a school elsewhere, as FHS cannot adequately accommodate those needs. The teachers/staff may be very nice and friendly, but the school is in such a poor location that it simply cannot offer students a wide variety of experiences (cultural, academic, field trips, etc.) or course offerings. Some parents have noted that they liked the small scope of the school, which is great if that's what you're looking for. I feel that students are rather limited in that type of setting, however; I certainly was, and in retrospect, having traveled extensively and continued my education through graduate school years later, I can fully appreciate how narrow a perspective the school affords its students.


Posted January 6, 2009

I moved to the Fayetteville community, for my children. It was that important to me that my children attend such an excellent school. Where else can a child attend school and feel as if they are at a family gathering on a daily basis. We love it!! Thanks to everyone at the school for all you do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2008

I enjoy attending Fayetteville High. It continues to get better and better every year. We are a little short on extra curricular activities, but the academics are great. I would like to see more improvements and activities from the science and mathematics departments. I feel that we should stabilize our staff in these departments and stop getting different staff members every year. But, altogether this is really an awesome school. There will always be room for improvements at any school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 10, 2008

Great for a country school, but if you are coming from a big school it is hard to get used to.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 21, 2008

We moved from a larger more suburban school system to the Fayetteville area so that our children could grow up in the country. We are so pleased with the small school setting that gives us a sense of community as well the excellent teaching available at the school. We would recommend it to other parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2008

I enjoy teaching at Fayetteville. It's a wonderful community with great students, parents, and caring citizens. I'm in the 'high school department' and would be happy to answer any question from the last reviewer and hope I'd never make a joke of any of their concerns. I understand and value a parent's desire for the best for their children. I want that as well!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 1, 2007

There is no one on one in the High school department. If you ask for help they make a joke out of it!!!!! Witch in turn doesn't do anything but upset the child.And they never answer!!!! From: a concerned parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2007

awesome school ,sports teams getting better,good teachers
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 12, 2006

As a student of Fayetteville I love it. I think that Fayetteville is great school that is just getting better. We have a new principal and she is doing a great job at trying to help our little school. She is bringing in new, good things! I can't wait to see what else happens in the future. We may not be the absolute best at sports, but i think that our coaches are going to help our athletes and we will have great athletics in the near future!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 22, 2005

this school is small and has excellent one on one attention
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 93% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 87% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students83%
Female88%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty83%
Not poverty84%

Reading

All Students83%
Female82%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty83%
Not poverty84%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female79%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible65%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant75%
Poverty68%
Not poverty83%

Reading

All Students88%
Female95%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant88%
Poverty86%
Not poverty89%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students93%
Female96%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty95%

Reading

All Students94%
Female96%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant94%
Poverty94%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female84%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant85%
Poverty77%
Not poverty93%

Reading

All Students93%
Female97%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible90%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty92%
Not poverty93%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female60%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible54%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant58%
Poverty53%
Not poverty67%

Reading

All Students93%
Female96%
Male90%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible93%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female79%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant84%
Poverty76%
Not poverty91%

Reading

All Students80%
Female79%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible65%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%
Poverty67%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students83%
Female92%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant83%
Poverty82%
Not poverty85%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students80%
Female80%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible79%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant80%
Poverty74%
Not poverty90%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 76% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
87%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
93%
Language

The state average for Language was 91% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
93%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 88% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Not migrant98%
Poverty100%
Not poverty96%

Language

All Students76%
Female79%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Not migrant76%
Poverty69%
Not poverty85%

Math

All Students93%
Female94%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible88%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English93%
Not migrant93%
Poverty91%
Not poverty96%

Reading

All Students83%
Female79%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible68%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Not migrant83%
Poverty75%
Not poverty93%

Social Studies

All Students81%
Female79%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible84%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English81%
Not migrant81%
Poverty81%
Not poverty81%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Not migrant98%
Poverty94%
Not poverty100%

Language

All Students83%
Female95%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible62%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Not migrant83%
Poverty65%
Not poverty0%

Math

All Students90%
Female95%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Not migrant90%
Poverty76%
Not poverty100%

Reading

All Students90%
Female95%
Male87%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible69%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English90%
Not migrant90%
Poverty76%
Not poverty100%

Social Studies

All Students88%
Female95%
Male83%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Free lunch eligible77%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General populationn/a
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English88%
Not migrant88%
Poverty82%
Not poverty92%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 93% 58%
Black 6% 34%
Two or more races 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 53%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Nicki Bryant
Fax number
  • (256) 315-5574

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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170 West W Averitte Dr
Sylacauga, AL 35151
Website: Click here
Phone: (256) 315-5550

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