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GreatSchools Rating

J U Blacksher School

Public | PK-12

 

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Community Rating

4 stars


Teacher quality

Principal leadership

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted July 23, 2008

Uriah is the best school in the county. Competition is not as hard and more kids are able to participate in activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2008

My oldest daughter began attending JUB in the 1st grade this year. She went to K-5 at another school and I have to say, that comparing the two, I am extremeley pleased with JUB. There are extracurricular activities galore! The younger children can choose from cheerleading, majorrette, pee-wee football, softball, baseball, etc. There was none of that to choose from at the other school. They have computer lab every day, whereas it's only offered once a week at the other school. Her DIBELS scores have been high. She scored higher that another friend of ours that is still at the other school. Last year, this friend scored higher than my daughter. Mrs. Baggett is my daughter's teacher and I think she is doing an exceptional job. I couldn't be happier! It's growing and superb! Go Bulldogs! Rorie Walker--proud parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2007

James, sorry you had such an unfulfilling experience. Like you, I wrangled with some of the unenlightened persons in the community. Unlike you, I found it within myself and within another sect of people the energy and propensity to make the bes of it. When I attended school at JUB , we were not scholastically recognized; we were high spirited. What I have observed in my nieces and my younger cousins is that this school has become preferred in the county for many reasons. I applaud that. I challenge you to consider that you, I, and every person that has touched the hallways has contributed to the great success of JUB today. People are now proud to say that their children attend our Blacksher. That's fantastic. Go Bulldogs!
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 17, 2007

A great school! Of course, I might be bias. My father graduated at Blacksher in the fifties. I also graduated at Blacksher in 1982. Now, my 2 children attend. I have really enjoyed watching the school prosper. Kudos to Mrs. Peavy for all her hard work in getting grants and advancing the school! There are many talented teachers and the administration is excellent as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2007

I attended JUB school and graduated in 1991. I married and moved to Stokton AL with my husband. When the time came for our daughter to start school we quickly decided to return to the Goodway area, so my children could attend Blacksher. I had GREAT experiences at BHS and wanted my children to also have the opportunity to be a partof this great school. My youngest daughter will finish Kindergarden today and I am very pleased with the way her school year went. Her teacher, Mrs. Glenda English is exceptional with her students (her babies as she calls them). In my opinion J.U. Blacksher is the best school in monroe county, and they provide an excellent education for your children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2006

I would like to say that I have 2 children in this school and I am very satisfied with their progress. I feel that there are alot of programs for them to get involved in. We are not from this area, do not have any family history here, but we were welcomed with open arms to the community and the school. I feel this is the best move we have made or will ever make for out childrens education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2005

as a recent graduate i can see that it has been a while since mr mcovney has been at JUB, the teachers are great, extra curricular activities are wonderful for a school this small and there is not a problem with racism or old world values. as recently published in the monroe journal, JUB is one of only of a couple of schools in the county that met AYP requirements.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 21, 2005

Its sad that no one has ever heard of James. I've lived in Uriah for 30 years and have worked with the school system for 25. I don't know where he's getting his info from. Just look at our SAT's, our ASHGE rate, and the latest ARMS test results. Sorry, but Blacksher leads the county. As for Excel, yes they are a good school but they are now on the state's watch list. Students are able to transfer to another school (not Blacksher because we're over crowded) but they can go to Shields or Frisco City. All of my children went to Blacksher, and are now very successful. They had plenty of extra curricular activities to keep them busy. Sorry James had negative experiences. Maybe it wasn't the school's fault. Sometimes we must take responsibility for the negative or positive things that happen to us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2005

I went to school here and though alot has changed. I still think it is a very backwards school and community. If I were a prospective parent of a student I would definately look into Excel or Monroe Academy. Extracurricular act. are lacking as are arts and music. The quality is of the programs is a nightmare. I chose Military school over this one, and another time a chose Catholic Prep. Seriously there are alot of old world values here which aren't a bad thing. But there is the old boy network to deal with which means unless your pops went here..or they know who your pops is ..you ain't nothin!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted November 1, 2004

This is a very good school to attend. All the people there are really nice.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
49%

2009

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
67%

2009

 
 
81%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

51 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
49%

2009

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

51 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
82%

2009

 
 
79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 91% in 2012.

59 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
93%

2009

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 89% in 2012.

59 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
81%

2009

 
 
87%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

66 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
87%

2009

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 88% in 2012.

66 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
83%

2009

 
 
79%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
34%

2009

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 86% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
64%

2009

 
 
74%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 79% in 2012.

60 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
74%

2009

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 79% in 2012.

60 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
70%

2009

 
 
63%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students69%
Female66%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White72%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population68%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Poverty54%
Non-poverty89%

Reading

All Students84%
Female90%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible73%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population84%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Poverty77%
Non-poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female85%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible80%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Poverty79%
Non-poverty94%

Reading

All Students94%
Female100%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White95%
Free lunch eligible92%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population96%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Poverty94%
Non-poverty94%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female100%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White98%
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty97%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students76%
Female78%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White78%
Free lunch eligible62%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty67%
Non-poverty88%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female88%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White86%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population85%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Poverty79%
Non-poverty82%

Reading

All Students92%
Female94%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White96%
Free lunch eligible91%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population97%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Poverty89%
Non-poverty95%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female83%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White80%
Free lunch eligible75%
Reduced lunch eligible92%
Special educationn/a
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant79%
Poverty80%
Non-poverty78%

Reading

All Students83%
Female80%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White82%
Free lunch eligible82%
Reduced lunch eligible92%
Special educationn/a
General population83%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Poverty85%
Non-poverty78%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Math

All Students65%
Female61%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White77%
Free lunch eligible39%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population67%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Poverty45%
Non-poverty84%

Reading

All Students62%
Female73%
Male48%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White67%
Free lunch eligible43%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population64%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Poverty45%
Non-poverty77%
Scale: % level 3 or 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math. The ARMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 80% in 2012.

59 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
95%

2009

 
 
87%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
36%

2009

 
 
49%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students92%
Female91%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White94%
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population92%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant92%
Poverty85%
Non-poverty100%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Science

All Students59%
Female60%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White57%
Free lunch eligible54%
Reduced lunch eligible75%
Special educationn/a
General population57%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Poverty60%
Non-poverty56%
Scale: % level 3 or level 4

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama Science Assessment (ASA) to test students in grades 5 and 7 in science. The ASA is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficiency level 3.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 95% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Language

The state average for Language was 75% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
78%

2009

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 85% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
88%

2009

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 83% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
85%

2009

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2009.

45 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
82%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 71% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
76%

2009

 
 
85%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 98% in 2012.

53 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Language

The state average for Language was 90% in 2012.

53 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%

2009

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 95% in 2012.

53 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%

2009

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 94% in 2012.

53 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%

2009

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 94% in 2009.

41 students were tested at this school in 2009.

2009

 
 
95%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 90% in 2012.

53 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
94%

2009

 
 
88%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students94%
Female100%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White97%
Free lunch eligible89%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population96%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Poverty93%
Non-poverty95%

Language

All Students76%
Female96%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White84%
Free lunch eligible53%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population80%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Poverty64%
Non-poverty90%

Math

All Students82%
Female88%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White89%
Free lunch eligible68%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population82%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Poverty79%
Non-poverty86%

Reading

All Students73%
Female76%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White82%
Free lunch eligible58%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population78%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Poverty68%
Non-poverty81%

Social Studies

All Students51%
Female44%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White58%
Free lunch eligible47%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population53%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Poverty46%
Non-poverty57%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Biology I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Language

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Math

All Students98%
Female96%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population98%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Poverty96%
Non-poverty100%

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White100%
Free lunch eligible100%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population100%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Poverty100%
Non-poverty100%

Social Studies

All Students94%
Female93%
Male96%
Blackn/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian/Alaskan Nativen/a
White93%
Free lunch eligible96%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Special educationn/a
General population94%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Poverty96%
Non-poverty92%
Scale: % passing

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Alabama used the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE) to test high school students in reading, math, language, biology and social studies. High school students must pass the AHSGE in order to graduate. The AHSGE is a standards-based test, which means it measures specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Alabama. The goal is for all students to pass the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Alabama Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Alabama Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 58%
Black 13% 34%
American Indian/Alaska Native 4% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 5%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 58%N/A56%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Greg L Shehan
Fax number
  • (251) 862-2808

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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15933 Hwy 21 South
Uriah, AL 36480
Phone: (251) 862-2130

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