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GreatSchools Rating

Rio Del Mar Elementary School

Public | K-6

 
 

Living in Aptos

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $499,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,980.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted June 3, 2014

I was bullied, beaten up and picked on by not only the students but by some of the staff due to my origin of birth!


Posted August 23, 2013

awful! DO NOT ENROLL YOUR CHILD IN THIS SCHOOL! I had to pull my child out on the first week because of a bloody knee. She is so depressed from this school she has not talked to me since we left. I really wish I could rate it 0 stars. Everyone gets bullied there. Also most of the teachers yell at the students. This may seem childish but every word is worth listening to.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 19, 2013

We moved to Aptos from Sacramento this year. Rio Del Mar Elementary has been great! It is a high ranking school so I was worried it would be filled with entitled children and parents. It is casual an friendly as well as amazing academically! The kids arenice and respectful, the teachers are great and the principal is impressive We are very happy here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2012

Unfortunately, we had to pull both our children out of Rio Del Mar Elementary because there was no opportunity for our sons to excel. Our oldest son was there through third grade but, because he was such a nice kid and strong student, he was constantly being seated between kids that caused problems in class as a "buffer" or his teachers counted on him to help explain concepts to struggling students. When we asked for this to stop we were ignored. Our younger son was about to enter kindergarten, but we received several very rude phone calls from the new principal telling us she "advised against" enrolling kids who are on the young-side into kindergarten. We told her he was already starting to read and understood basic math concepts, but in the end she was so aggressive with us we didn't want to put our child into a situation where he wouldn't be welcome. In the end both my kids flourished in the local private school - worth every penny. Kids there are kind, teachers attentive, and everyone is welcome to move at their own pace.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 20, 2012

The reason the children score high on tests is because the curriculum is pressed on them at a very fast pace. Worksheets galore. The teachers try to insert as much art as they can but they are frustrated because the fast pace of learning does not leave much time for it. The Spectra arts program leaves about one hour per week for art/music. What the school lacks is a program or game plan for teaching kids how to be nice to others. Kids are kids, and those who act mean or even violent toward others on the playground get away with it almost every time. There are no set consequences and the teachers are not on the playground during recess. It is a free-for all. If your child does not like rough play (verbal/physical), your child will be swallowed whole. More parents need to speak up when it comes to creating an atmosphere of peace. If more parents make this a priority, I think there can be a change.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2012

We really love this school because the teachers have been very kind and energetic and the principal is educated, thoughtful, very responsive and well spoken. It's in a really beautiful ocean view setting and parents are very involved. In our class we have about three volunteers a day so the teacher is always supported. The teaching is traditional/progressive and the classrooms are spotless, bright, sunny, cheery with plenty of supplies. I would say there is not a lot of diversity at Rio Del Mar, this is a predominantly affluent, white suburb, which is representative of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2011

Yikes, this school is bad. Completely agree with the other reviewer about bullying. Also,in my experience, there are a select group of students who get selective treatment with the best teachers year after year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2011

We pulled our child out of this school due to the overwhelming and relentless bullying he experienced here. The bullying is pervasive at all grade levels unfortunately. The girls are no more immune to this environment than their male peers. I have never seen such ruthless behavior in young children. The school is too large to effectively manage the problem and the parents seem more interested in socializing with one another than taking action.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2010

Though Rio gets the great blue ribbons, there is a well known fact in the community about RIO... Zero Tolerance bullying but that is just not the case. Victims are made to confront their tormentors. As anyone knows, kids (people) recant their stories for fear of retaliation. Rio does not follow their own rules of discipline. I have talked to other Unified school employees who have pulled their children out of RIO for the lack of action on the part of the principle(s). I have talked to many parents whose kids have been bullied and their tormentors rarely get suspended, expelled..just a colored note w/ a slap on the hand. Parents and kids are made to sign a contract (that lists the consequences for bullying - that are not enforced). There is 1 assembly in the beginning of the school year re bullying. Effective? If the Administrators @ RIO were in touch w/ the realities of the playground they might change things. But they are out of touch. The parents of kids that I have talked to are afraid to go to school at times. As my (bullied) child says: "School sucks". Their motto is: "Where open hearts and open minds rule". Really. 1 on 1 w/ rio admins do not work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

Rio Del Mar Elementary school is a top notch school, with an amazing Principal, Vice Principal, staff and volunteers. The children are treated with great respect by talented and caring teachers. Even though these challenging economic times, parents are doing their best to keep their many programs running, with much success! Their Star test scores are high and gaining. We couldn't be happier!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2008

Rio is a solid school with an incredible staff. Each grade level (K-6) has dynamic teachers that work very hard and put in many hours beyond their contracts. Many of the teachers are still on the campus after all the soccer and baseball practices are over. The administration is very available and willing to listen, as are the office personal. My children have gained so much from this wonderful group of educators.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2007

this is a really good school i love it!
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 29, 2007

Sorry to see that the principal has decided to leave. He really has been a great asset to the school. However, I'm happy that he is moving on as it seems like his hands have been tied with regards to several issues in the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2007

Sixth grade is in the mud as teachers go. You can have a pleasant male teacher, but not learn a heck of a lot, except for computer technology. Or, you can have one of the majorly overbearing, unapproachable female teachers who walk around with frowns on their faces and give tons of homework, even on the weekends. If I had a child who was getting ready to reach the sixth grade, I would seriously think about transferring to Valencia where I have been told that the sixth grade teachers are more much more reasonable and patient. I think there should be a law where teachers should not be able to have a classroom more than five years as it seems like they either burn out or get too set in their ways. Anyway, I wish all sixth grade students luck. I really do mean that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2007

I agree with the comments below on work outside the classroom, and long term projects that cannot possibly be done without complete participation of the parent, thus taking up their weekends as well! Also, nothing seems to be done about teasing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2007

I find that there is way too much homework in the upper grades. I think, there should be more emphasis on core academics and less fooling around in school (excessive parties, field trips, etc.) so weekends will not be so flooded with work and projects that could be done during school hours. Teachers have our children all week and they should use that time wisely. When weekends roll around, students should have the opportunity to relax, be kids, and enjoy family life without having homework hanging over their heads. In addition, there is too much of an emphasis on grades. The honor roll and principal's list assembly each trimester seems a little unnecessary and unfair, especially when teachers grade differently. Anyway, it makes for too much competition and labeling. Please note: my child is on 'the list' and I still feel this way.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2006

Way too much focus on test scores. GATE students are neglected as they already bring the scores up. Special needs students are neglected as they have little to offer the test scores. Social Studies and Science are given a very basic and excessively boring once over. Creates great testers, but not great learners. I agree with the focus on mediocrity for all! Teacher quality declines as you get into the grades 4-6. Parents are a bit over the top in participation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2006

This school provides a great academic program. Parents stay constanly involved and teachers encourage this involvement. The only draw back has been my daughter's classrooms. Over the past five years, she has been reassigned teachers three times due to various reasons.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2006

The positives- Safe campus, affluent and well educated parent body, great website and communication to the home, spirited principal and state awards. The negatives- School prize incentives for good behavior, smelly restrooms, poor GATE program, small library and not alot of invovative teaching practices.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted December 2, 2005

Great school...above average parental involvement. Wonderful principle & teachers are top noch! There is a great positive feeling all around. This school is definately all about the kids and making sure that no child is left behind.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

911

Change from
2012 to 2013

+4

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

911

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+4

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
76%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

82 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females92%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students90%
Females95%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females71%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)53%
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate63%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females85%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disability71%
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females79%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students81%
Females89%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females91%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females90%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students86%
Females93%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females97%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Females88%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 85%
Hispanic 8%
Asian 3%
Black 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 10%N/AN/A
English language learners 3%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 5%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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819 Pinehurst Drive
Aptos, CA 95003
Phone: (831) 688-2053

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