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GreatSchools Rating

Holly Avenue Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 656 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted June 29, 2014

My son is autistic. Last semester he was in the 2nd grade SDC class at Holly Avenue Elementary School. We scheduled several observations of my son s class and immediately noticed that my son was seated 3 feet away from his peers. The seating arrangement seemed permanent. We asked for our son to be included with his peers. One day my wife saw our son sitting alone while the other kids sat together on the floor. He was not with his 1:1 aid; the aid was somewhere else in the classroom. My wife asked the teacher why our son was sitting alone. The teacher yelled back, Next time sign in at the office okay! The teacher later denied this. We also learned that my son had been crying every day. We learned early in the semester my son s individual DTT sessions were conducted in either the school s stock room or the vending machine room. Neither room was conducive to learning. After complaining, DTT sessions were moved to the classroom. My wife usually talks with other parents. One day the principal heard her talking about our son. The principal then told my wife that she could not speak about our son s situation, obviously trying to shut her up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2014

My son is just about completing his first year at Holly Ave We made the switch from private to public after learning how amazing Arcadia schools were. It is quite sad that we were disappointed. My son is an average level kid. He is not the most academically advanced nor academically delayed. It seemed as if you get the most attention only if you are extremely delayed, which I understand but there were obvious subjects in which my child needed extra help and because he wasn't delayed he had to "figure it out" on his own. Another thing, he would come home with homework that I constantly had to teach him because when i would ask him if his teacher went over it, he would say no. was he maybe not paying attention? maybe. but as a teacher, i believe it is your job to make sure students are understanding the subject and if they are not, to use a different teaching style with the kid since everyone has a different learning style. His teacher had a very laid back teaching style pass out worksheets and do them on your own while i check my email style. My child will be returning to this school in hopes that next years teacher has a different teaching style, if not, he will be pulled out ASAP.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2013

My child currently attends the kindergarden at this school, and it has been a very difficult year for my child and for me as a parent. My child's teacher has been teaching an advance curriculum comparable to what I remember learning in 2-3 grade. The kids homeworks consists of 4 pages of either math or writing sentences every night. On top of this there are reading assignment of anywhere from 6-12 think reading books. This might be good new to those tiger moms and dads out there who want their child to participate at a higher level, but for me I just want my child to enjoy their childhood and learn what is appropriate for their grade level. The teacher expects each child to write out sentences starting from 3-4 sentences to 6-8 sentences now. The sentences need to be in detail form and they have to form out the words using phonics. My child is having difficulty catching up and has been left behind. I do not believe my child is the only one. I have to spend 2 hours every night with my child to complete the homework assignment, and it has been very exhausting for me, especially after a long days work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2012

It's only our second year at this school and our academic impression of kindergarten and first grade has been pretty good. However, there seem to be so many rules that are aimed at creating a cookie cutter child. Our son told us that there was a costume parade for Halloween. When I asked if his class marched in it, he told me that they are not allowed to march. They must walk in traveling position. Really, traveling position? I d never heard of traveling position. I m told it means backs straight, hands at their sides, no talking. Wow Holly Avenue! You guys really know how take the fun out of a parade! So many rules for doing everything you must use your inside voice when eating at the outside area, there is no running on the wood chips, you must use jazz hands, not clapping, at assemblies. Good heavens, some of these rules are just ridiculous. Now, I don t think I m hip, slick and cool, but Jazz hands, that s just plain goofy. When is a kid just supposed to be a kid, make some noise, blow off some steam during the day? Our kids are not academic robots; they need some time to burn off some energy and exercise creativity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2012

Arcadia School District is one of the best school districts in Los Angeles County including the San Gabriel Valley. Great schools with wonderful programs with the exception of Holly Ave. This school unfortunately is not serious about implementing programs that extracurricular that build student interest and esteem.These programs are vital for a child's learning experience,or at least the opportunity to participate in one.The principal likes book smart students and parents that keep their mouth shut, anything other than the later and your on her radar. There is no creative learning or the sort. No emphasis on individual learning styles, or focus on students talents and gifts-just a cookie cutter mentality. Its so much easier and less work for the principle and her staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2011

Holly Avenue is a wonderful school which is led by a very dedicated principal. We moved our daughter to Holly from a private school and have been very happy with our decision. Holly has high academic standards but also makes sure to give students a well rounded academic curriculum and especially stresses good character, which shows when you see the students helping each other out at all grade levels. The proof is seeing the kids happy and smiling everyday they go to school. We love this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2011

The school has a great character program led incredibly well by the principal. She has set a high standard and she and the staff spend a lot of time working with kids and parents. I love this school for my kids. Academics are stressed but kids get to grow at their own rate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 20, 2008

My child had great friends and learned a lot! I Thank this this school a ton!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2008

I am anxious for my children to start school this year. They have worked hard and have improved their academics with the teachers and staff. The principal greets parents and children and makes them feel welcome. She is good for the school. Most of the teachers are wonderful. It is a 'great school' in Arcadia...not too pretentious or snooty but high level.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2007

It really depends on the teacher you get. I must say most of the teachers are wonderful and so is the principal. They do have a few Teachers that really do need to go. They do teach well But they have other intentions on donations of money being sent in and how much and the welfare of the tone they speak to the children. I do know I have seen and been told. Many kids have cried and later didn't like the teacher. But to each there own Please watch out on how much you put out for your teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2007

The principle was incredibly supportive of my son's teacher, sending him to conferences to help her figure out effective interventions. He had a difficult transition from private school, but with a lot of hard work from his teacher, the counselor, the school psychologist and the principle, he continued to love learning and can't wait to go into second grade. He doesn't want to go back to his old school anymore.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2007

I'm very disappointed with my child's teacher. Until this year, her teachers were all great. I'm not afraid she'll fall behind in the next grade and is considering transferring her to a different school within the district. The current teacher simple does not show much efforts and was very passive during open house and provides virtually no feedback about the child's progress and offer little opinions during our meetings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2007

The principle is to easy going on staff. Main focus is dollars for the school. We had give alot of supplies to the class. Very disapointed after having children in Highland oaks which is an outstanding school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2006

I heard good things abt this school but am very dissappointed with it. My child's teacher has been absent for more than half of the entire school year. No reason was given. No lesson plan was left. My child will be behind other kids when he goes to 2nd grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2005

It is academically very strong.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2005

Pretty Good actually. Academic Programs are good, everything is pretty good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2005

I am real happy with Holly Ave. School. The teachers that I meet all care about our Children. The only thing I wish the school would go back to is year round. I truely think if all the parents were educated on the benifits of year round they would vote to bring it back. Our children are the ones going to hurt in the long run. Year round was great because there was less time wasted on reteaching the kids when they came off of summer vacation. With out the teachers being so helpful I would not be able to volunteer like I do, and thank you. Sincerely Tracy Houltram
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

910

Change from
2012 to 2013

-12

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

910

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-12

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
73%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

109 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students79%
Females88%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner48%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to state47%

Math

All Students84%
Females86%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learner87%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)65%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to state73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females67%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asian65%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learner19%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate67%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students84%
Females82%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learner88%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females90%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino60%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learner59%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females96%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino79%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learner95%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate98%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females85%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino73%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner59%
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Females79%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner79%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)80%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students83%
Females82%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner65%
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Asian 56%
White 18%
Hispanic 17%
Black 3%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 26%N/AN/A
English language learners 18%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Christine Blackstock
Fax number
  • (626) 574-3809

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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360 West Duarte Road
Arcadia, CA 91007
Phone: (626) 821-8355

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