Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

W. R. Powell Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 

Living in Azusa

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $240,200. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,490.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

11 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted May 15, 2014

As a teacher at this school I can assure you that we do not in any way discourage or treat parent volunteers poorly. The parent who was new here and wrote the negative review of our school brought much of the negative experiences upon herself. When you are new to a school and come in like a bulldozer trying to change everything all at once with no regard for the staff or parents that have been here for years, doing all they can to help our students, of course you will be met with confusion and uncertainty. Without getting too much into personal issues I can say that the teacher of this particular student was very accommodating and patient with this parent. However, it was never enough. When a parent feels they have the right to try and take over everything, they are overstepping boundaries. Our school is not a negative unwelcoming place....unless you act in a way that invites negativity.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 9, 2014

The talent show spoken off earlier was wonderful. The teacher who volunteers her time, Mrs. Morales, deserves many, many kudos for the work she puts in working with these children. My family and I were treated to many wonderful acts...the first act was a little kindergartener who experienced microphone problems, but continued on quite professionally while waiting for a replacement mic and picked right up where she was supposed to be in the song. She finished, bowed to the audience, than ran off stage. She was adorable. Another cute act was song by a young boy and was well directed and choreographed. Later in the show another young man sang a sad song with much feeling. The emcee did a great job, even with the corny jokes (lol). It couldn't have been a better evening. Thanks go out to everyone involved in the show, with special credit to Mrs. Morales.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2014

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending the Powell Elementary talent show. The gym was absolutely overflowing with parents and students- parent holding signs, students cheering for every performer. The overall supportive and encouraging atmosphere was touching and very impressive. The stage was beautifully decorated and every act included costumes, dance moves, and often background singers and props. I learned that the show is put on each year by one exceptionally dedicated teacher, who volunteers months of rehearsing with these kids to make sure their moments of pride and glory are special. As I entered the auditorium, I had the chance to meet the new principal, who was standing in the doorway with her daughter greeting every guest. She displayed the sharp and professional attitude of a woman fit to lead a faculty and staff without sacrificing the cheerfulness and warmth of someone fit to lead children. Parent volunteers spent the night outside, chatting, laughing, and selling snacks to families. This community was so positive and welcoming. One student performed a song she wrote herself, entitled Powell Knows How to Party. And I have to say, I definitely agree.


Posted March 25, 2014

This is the worst school I have ever been to. This is our first year here and we are all ready exploring other options. The staff is rude and unkind. My sons teacher is not just rude but very condescending, Ex, she refused to allow me to count box tops because "It's very complicated and a lot of work", this was after she complained that she had no help, she also does not want parent volunteers in her class. The Principal is new and does not display strong leadership qualities. The school appears to be run by the janitor, whom is hostile towards parents and students, and the other support staff. This is the only school I have ever been to that is not supportive of parent volunteers. Do not send your kids to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2012

I do like the school because it is a small school so it is easier in learning the names of the staff. However I feel that the staff needs to do a better job at challenging students that are a bit more advanced than the other children in their class. The bullying tends to be a problem and the child being bullied is the one that tends to get caught every time when trying to stick up for themselves. The principal needs to really listen to the concerns of the parents, if we come to you its not for our health it is because it is a genuine concern that needs to be address. I pray that this year my child will be more challenged and not pushed to the side while waiting for the rest of the class to "catch up". I feel that more parents need to do their part when it comes to helping their children study as well as discipline at home so they know how to behave at school..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2011

I have taught at Powell School for many years, and truly love the community that we serve. In the past, we had a principal who was not a good leader, and that affected staff morale. Now we have an awesome principal who works very hard for the students of Azusa. Remember though, parents play an important part in their child's education. Without their help and support, the child will not succeed, no matter how hard the teachers work. Powell School is filled with caring, dedicated individuals who care about each and every student.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 26, 2009

We have lived across the street from Powell Elementary for 35 years. All our 5 children attended school there. We were extremely pleased with all of their teachers and principals. I now substitute teach in the Azusa School District and Powell is a model school. The staff is always pleasant and helpful. The students are good and have parents who care. I highly recommend Powell Elementary School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2007

This is our first year with Powell, and as a parent, I am very pleased. Indeed the school is small, which helps in knowing the 'faces' of the school and the secretaries are experienced and pleasant there. The principal is very kind and helpful. I am satisfied with this school and my child's teacher. Overall, a satisfied parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2007

I do not recommend Powell School. I had my student pulled from the school. I was warned before enrolling my child there and I should have listened. The principal does not following through on concerns parents have made. Especially when it comes to student safety. The office staff is rude, both when you call and walk in. Some of the teachers work really hard to see the students become successful, but unfortunately the bad outweighs the good. Young students are being bullied and the principal will do nothing!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2007

This school has terrible leadership. The prinicpal does not work well with teachers or students. Other then that most of the teachers are great and put in a lot of extra time. The 5th grade Washington DC trip is a truly awesome experience for the children that go.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2007

I have 2 nieces and 2 children that attend Powell. The school is small, and it makes you feel safe. The staff is great, and though it may seem that test scores are low, I know that the teachers here give their best everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

745

Change from
2012 to 2013

-43

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

745

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-43

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
26%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
31%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
41%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
40%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
29%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students37%
Females56%
Males21%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged35%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability41%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate40%
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)44%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females72%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino49%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learner45%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students26%
Females26%
Males25%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability27%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only28%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Females63%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students46%
Females58%
Males35%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduate40%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students51%
Females54%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate27%
Parent education - high school graduate47%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students41%
Females43%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability40%
English learner17%
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate45%
Parent education - high school graduate32%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students45%
Females52%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability45%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate45%
Parent education - high school graduate32%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students27%
Females27%
Males27%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate23%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 86%
White 6%
Black 3%
Asian 2%
Two or more races 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 87%N/AN/A
English language learners 28%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jennifer Wiebe
Fax number
  • (626) 633-8585

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1035 East Mauna Loa
Azusa, CA 91702
Phone: (626) 633-8500

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT