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GreatSchools Rating

Olinda Elementary School

Public | K-6

 

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Living in Brea

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $438,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,750.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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14 reviews of this school


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Posted May 25, 2014

There is a lot of favoritism and bias. The principal, K. KENNEDY, is horrible. She has offended me, other parents, and children. This principal is not a good leader and should be removed. I know many parents that cannot communicate with her. The teachers lack quality. Every teacher and office administration at this school should be removed. This school needs to be reorganized starting from the top. It is sad when the parents send primary students to outside tutors, reading clubs, mathnazium, and so forth because they know this school does not teach the child. I have taken my children out and placed them elsewhere. My children have learned a lot more and like the new school much better (public school). When you see problems at this school call the superintendent ( although he sits in his office and won't do anything), Skip Roland. Call the media, call the state of California. ..do whatever but let your concerns be heard. Think again before enrolling your child here. Also, if you do enroll your child make sure you observe what is really happening and how things are handled. Be of luck!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2014

Our children attended this school for several years, one child K-6. With that being said, there has been a big disappointing change in the vibe at this school since the campus moved from the nice simple tranquil location on Lilac Lane, and shifted to the large expensive state of the art location next to the Brea Sports Park. The vibe has shifted from a nurturing educational gem to a big business. Don't be fooled there is an old school club here among these teachers, they stick together and lobby parents to address the district on their behalf. Many of them attended Brea schools as youngsters themselves and are part of the "Brea Bubble Mentality" - the Brea Way or the highway mode of thinking. We have been blessed with a large family and our younger children are no longer attending Brea schools. It has been the smartest choice in the world for our family. If you are choosing an Elementary school in the city of Brea you will receive somewhat of a quality education... however, one that contains a lot of sticky red tape and politics along the journey. The junior high is deplorable and the high school is like a prison of pompous arrogant adults who couldn't make it in the private sector
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 16, 2014

This school is okay! I've been actively involved with this school, however I have to say there's favoritism and biased among some of the teachers towards parents who volunteer or whom the teacher knows. While there are a number of wonderful teachers, but others existed at the school should not be teaching. For example, he/she does not help kids achieve personal growth nor challenge them as well as understand the learning styles of children. This school is very competitive on API scores among districts and it's obvious! The reason they have a high score is because parents hired tutors, or are affiliated with some type of after school academic enrichment program or club. I feel even I can do a their better job than some of these teachers and I've done so with my kids. No thanks to them! The school could improve with hiring high qualified staff and administrators to lead the path and understand more about multicultural diversity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2013

This principal, Kelly Kennedy, needs to be removed and go back into the classroom because she is out of touch with learning styles, diversity, and multicultural students. I have been please with many of the teachers except for a couple that should not be teaching. There is a lot of favoritism and biased if you do not live in the million dollar homes. If you live in any apartments or are thought to be a single parent, your child is treated differently. The only reason why the test scores are high is because the parents pay for tutors and outside learning clubs or associations. The teachers that are exceptional include: Mrs. Dixon, Mrs Walsh, Mrs Heard, Mrs. Hubbard, Mrs. Wellen, Mrs. Howland, Mrs. Maddock, and Mr. Kessell. There are a few teachers that are new so I cannot rate them and I have no exposure to. Also, I do not believe the majority of these teachers could teach at schools such as Laurel, Aerovista, or Country Hills Elementary School. Visit the classrooms and communicate often. This school could do much better with a highly qualified staff and administrator leading the way. The teachers named rate as 4 or 5 stars on teacher quality.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2013

it is a good school has great programs but this year they had combine classrooms and this year I seen a lot of struggling in classrooms in my son's classroom were 7 kids for retention and all bilingual. some great teacher but the principal not the best, the school has had better ones. after all it is ok but not like last years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2011

I attended Olinda from 1970 - 1978 and credit my success in life to my early education. I still live just up the street and have witnessed decades of excellence & awards coming out of Olinda Elementary.


Posted September 14, 2010

Olinda Elementary is a great school! I have two children attending the school and they have so much fun while learning a lot at the school. It is a small school and all teachers know all students. The teachers really care for the students educational and social developments. The parents have strong involvements to various school activities and maintain open communications with the teachers. The principal, Mrs. Kennedy, is exceptional in creating and maintaining such great school environments. She is very approachable, and you can always find her at the gate of the school greeting school children on the first name basis at the start of a school day. She often takes up on a broom and sweeps the school ground, and starts a conversation with parents to discuss about the events going on at the school and children s progresses. We feel fortunate and privileged to have our children attend the school, and would like to say many thanks to the teachers and the principal at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2009

Olinda is fantastic. The principal knows every student and does her best to put them in the classroom that is best for them. I think the principal is terrific!!! She knows how to motivate and encourage the kids to do their best.The teachers really care. The parents are nice and low key. Great opportunities for PTO involvement. Very welcoming school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2008

Olinda is a wonderful school with excellent teachers. It continues to be a positive experience for our kids. The principal is fantastic too!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2008

My daughter has been going to Olinda for 6 years and every year I am amazed at the growth she has made. Great School. Amazing teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2007

I love Olinda, and I've also moved to Brea just to attend this school. Although it is a public school, we feel that it is a private school in many ways. I love our pincipal, and I really cannot tell what is the weakness of her being said here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2007

I love Olinda, we have the plus of a private school (small, only 300 students),with public school funding, we have parent involvement and a great principal.She loves the students, all of them, and whomever stated that she is racist must have some insecurities to work out. The school has students of all race and my daughter has been attending since kindergarten and she is now in 4th grade. I moved to brea specifically for olinda school, had to pay a lot for a house, but it is worth it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2006

Teachers are great, the weak link at this school is the principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2006

As a proud Olinda parent, I feel fortunate to have my children enrolled in such a strong academically enriched environment; with such a warm and energetic staff! We are now proud to be a California Distinguished school with an amazing api score of 904! Outstanding job to our wonderful Principal and teachers!We love Olinda!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

932

Change from
2012 to 2013

-18

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

932

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-18

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
76%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students80%
Females84%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students94%
Females93%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate97%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females73%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students85%
Females91%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females97%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students86%
Females88%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females76%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino60%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students71%
Females57%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students83%
Females73%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino60%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females81%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students89%
Females73%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Asian 38%
Hispanic 28%
White 26%
Black 2%
Two or more races 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 18%N/AN/A
English language learners 15%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • California Distinguished School (2005)
  • National Blue Ribbon School (2007)

Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Honors track
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:00 am
School end time
  • 2:10 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Kelly Kennedy
Special schedule
  • Extended/longer school day
Fax number
  • (714) 528-7481

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Honors track
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
School leaders can update this information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3145 E. Birch Street
Brea, CA 92821
Phone: (714) 528-7475

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