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GreatSchools Rating

Multicultural Learning Center

Charter | K-8

 

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Living in Canoga Park

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $229,700. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,390.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted Friday, August 22, 2014

A few of the previous reviews definitely do not represent the opinions of the entire MLC community (nor do they follow the "GreatSchools review guidelines"). Of course, all posts are subjective and each family has their own experience with the teachers, administration, parents, and students. Our experience has been phenomenal, and my children are thriving in a supportive, academically challenging, innovative, inclusive environment. I have volunteered for years at the school (in the classroom, at Parent Council events, on field trips, etc.), and I have felt welcomed, appreciated and part of the partnership in educating my children. I am overwhelmed by the dedication and energy of the teachers and administration. No school is without challenges, growing pains, staff turnover, or conflicting personalities, but for our family, MLC is providing excellent and rare opportunities in education and in life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 20, 2014

Principal lacks teaching credentials and was given the position of principal because her mother was the former principal and was handed down the position. The new principal, Gayle Nadler, has made horrible decisions in the past few couple years and the quality has become horrendous. The kids no longer feel happy or comfortable as they did before, they no longer trust the principal, as well as the staff members. Highly regret taking my child there. -Submitted by a parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2014

They have a great program, one of the only Dual language programs on the West end of the San Fernando Valley. My problem is with the lack of communication and professionalism. My child has been on the waiting list for nearly two years. She was selected in the lottery and would have entered into a 3rd Kinder class, which did not happen. I have called on more than 10 occasions getting different information about where she stands On their waiting list each time. I understand how lotteries work but am considering being more proactive about their follow up with the board of education charter department. I'm sure if I have never received on follow up call, how would they know if other parent ahead of my child is still interested.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2014

MLC is a great school if you value bilingualism. Don't let the 5/10 rating scare you! Our home school was 10/10 and we were so happy that our kids got into this one. Some people thought we made a mistake but for us, giving our children the gift of another language is worth much more than a school having high test scores. Other advantages:small classroom sizes (20 students or less), free high quality before & afterschool care, caring teachers who are supported to pursue their professional development, and a being part of a very diverse community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2013

I am responding because someone wrote a review saying that negative comments are taken down regarding this school. I signed up for emails to alert me to the fact that a new review had been posted on Great Schools regarding the Multicultural Learning Center in 2006. I have never been alerted to a review being posted, later to learn that it was taken down. The posts that I have been alerted to are the posts that are there. The Multicultural Learning Center is a great school. I have a child that will be graduating from MLC this year. I could not be happier with my experience and my child's experience at this school. My child has been so happy with the school, had a wonderful social experience, and has tested very high on all State Testing in elementary and middle school. I feel my child is well prepared for high school and also now has the gift of being biligual and biliterate and an appreciation of cultural values that you just don't get at most schools. Certainly this school is not for everyone. That can pretty much be said for every school. Most parents that I know at MLC, and I know a lot, could not be happier with the choice to send their kids to MLC.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2013

It is has an exemplary dual language 90/10 Spanish immersion program. A big plus for me is that Spanish is the only language they focus on. Monolingual English speakers become fluent in Spanish--bilingual and biliteral in only a couple of years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2012

A great school has : Excellent teachers, Strong principal/school leadership, Challenging academic programs and no bully's. In that case, Multicultural Learning Center is a great school. MLC(the school's nickname) is a bully-free school and clique-free school. MLC may have a 5 out of 10, but I think it should have a 7 out of 10. Not only is it bilingual, but all the teachers are warm and push you to do your best. I like that. Do you? Well only you can find out if you do. The lines to enter kindergarten are sooooooooooooooooo loooooooooonnnnnggggggggg......... So hurry and put your child in this school!


Posted January 6, 2012

I have two children at MLC and they both love it. I have loved all of their teachers but one (my child loved that teacher though) and they have a pretty good after school program for free if you go every day. Their test scores are a little low but that is to be expected when children are learning two languages and being compared to those who only learn one. My kids love the school and there are the usual problems you find at any school but overall it is a small community that really cares about their students. The class sizes are small, even in this horrible economy, and although there is not an overabundance of funds, the school does just fine with supplies, programs, etc. I have no problem with my child going in other cars for field trips. Insurance is always verrified beforehand and if that is really a big issue then you should volunteer and drive the kids yourself :) I am happy my kids will be going to middle school at MLC because the kids really are better watched there than at a larger school and I feel like the middle schoolers have better heads on their shoulders thanother kids. But, if you have special needs for your child, this is not the school for you. Sorry!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

I was an intern at this school... great school. The school is well structured


Posted April 21, 2010

MLC is a Spanish Immersion school. It is fantastic. I have a daughter in 1st grade and she loves it. I love that she is learning Spanish effortlessly and that she is getting the tools she needs to flourish in a multi-cultural world.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2009

MLC is a fantastic opportunity for the next generation. Our children will be so much more successful in the world by their exposure not only to another language but the cultural diversity, tolerance and understanding that comes with it. We are English only speaking parents and were very nervous through most of Kindergarten but are so happy we held strong and stuck it out. Now our son is ready Spanish beautifully and picking up English all on his own. Just as we were told he would. We are incredibly happy that our children have this opportunity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2009

I cannot recommend MLC enough. I looked into over 15 schools, from privates to charters, and MLC is the only one that offers a Bi- lingual/Bi-literate program, with a progressive, creative focus, and a strong academic curriculum. Also, from K-8th grade! We are a English-only speaking family and my child started Kinder this year. It was a challenging transition for her the first month, but her teacher and the administrators were so supportive, available, and helpful to ALL of us. She loves school and is thriving beyond our expectations. In addition to all she is learning at MLC, we can't believe how well she speaks and understands spanish already. We love the cultural diversity at MLC and how all cultures are honored and celebrated in creative, meaningful ways. Also, we carpool from Valley Village with 2 other families, which makes it very manageable and creates a sense of community with one another.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2009

You are going to be hearing more and more about this school. My wife speaks minimal Spanish (from a college class) and I speak none and we have one child at MLC and another beginning next year. It's motivating us to learn new languages and challenge ourselves along with our children. MLC helps broaden the students' view of the world while giving an amazing education. The administration is so dedicated and the teachers educate with vision, creativity, and unbelievable energy. The parents are always invited to be involved and the school community is thriving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2008

I have two children at MLC, one 3rd grader and one 7th grader. (MLC currently goes K-7 and next year will go K-8.) Almost two years ago, we transferred from another dual immersion (90-10) in Santa Monica because my son promoted out of the school at the end of 5th grade. I actively searched for another language immersion so that my children would continue on their road to being biliterate and sensitive to other cultures. The transition to MLC was seamless because the curriculum was exactly the same. The number of students in the classrooms are much lower than conventional LAUSD schools -- especially in the higher grades. The teachers are excellent and the school feels like a community with broad parent support. If you re looking for a school that will enhance your child s vision of the world, then MLC is the school you re looking for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2008

MLC is a great school. If you are looking for your child to perform well on standardized tests, then this school is not for you. This school teachers your children not only fluency in another language, but about respect, diversity, people, friendship, etc. My daughter has learned a lot since starting Kindergarten, but what I like most is that she is happy there and has made some wonderful friends. I love their afterschool program ESCAPE. The after school teachers are loving and keep the children entertained. Just yesterday I picked my daughter up and all the kids and teachers were dancing to music and having a blast! Kids have the same teacher for Kindergarten and 1st grade, which is great cause Senora Hernandez is the best!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2008

I am a parent of a 1st grader. My daughter started kinder at MLC. I did not study in this country and I came to USA just 7 years ago; I did not understand very well what a charter school was, two scholar years have almost passed and they confirmed that I did the right choice and now I see my daughter having fun and enjoying school life so much, I can just say thanks teachers, administrators and other parents for making education so pleased to be involved with. And of course, my younger one will start kinder here too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2008

I am a parent of a Kinder. I am excited to be part of MLC. The administration and staff have a vision to build a community among the students and their families, in addition to encouraging academic achievement. The teachers teach to the needs of the child -- not merely for success on standardized tests (although the standardized test scores are rapidly climbing). You owe it to yourself to take a tour so that you can see all of the fantastic things that are going on, and to witness how well non-Spanish speakers are grasping the language with ease and excellence.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2007

I am a parent of a first grader at MLC. My son started at MLC in pre-K. As a bilingual, bicultural parent, I felt it very important for my son to become proficient in Spanish, not only in English. As a clinical psychologist, I applaud MLC teachers and staff for their commitment to my child and all the students. I am pleased that my child's academic, social, and emotional well-being are of utmost concern to his school. Thank you, MLC!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2007

I am a parent with two children at MLC. After seeing the quality of the school, the staff, and the commitment by all to the children learning not only academic content, but also to be caring citizens of our world, it was not difficult to remove my children from a gifted magnet school and place them at MLC. This was 4 years ago, and I couldn't be happier with my decision as I've seen the school grow and develop year by year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2007

As a parent and educator, I am very impressed with MLC. I became aware of MLC when many of their graduates attended the magnet school at which I was teaching. The graduates of MLC were well prepared for a rigorous academic program and were nice, respectful students. After working with former MLC students, I chose to put my child in this school: I couldn't be happier. My son is only in second grade, but so far my experience has been very positive: outstanding teachers, support staff, and school leaders. I highly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

791

Change from
2012 to 2013

+10

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

791

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+10

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
31%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

58 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
37%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
53%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
36%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
36%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
63%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
38%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students38%
Females24%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability40%
English learner31%
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate27%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduate39%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students58%
Females45%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino60%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner46%
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate55%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students30%
Females30%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino24%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged15%
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students63%
Females60%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner43%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students52%
Females68%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino37%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students53%
Females60%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only55%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate64%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females67%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students59%
Females52%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students56%
Females57%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females64%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students48%
Females36%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability45%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females77%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students38%
Females45%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students19%
Femalesn/a
Males9%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability20%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Femalesn/a
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students50%
Femalesn/a
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students68%
Femalesn/a
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 81%
White 9%
Black 4%
Two or more races 4%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 57%N/AN/A
English language learners 28%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 68 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
72%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
72%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
85%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
85%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
76%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
76%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents6813%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Gayle Nadler
Fax number
  • (818) 716-1085

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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7510 Desoto Avenue
Canoga Park, CA 91303
Website: Click here
Phone: (818) 716-5783

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