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GreatSchools Rating

Carrillo Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Carlsbad

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $560,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,720.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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44 reviews of this school


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Posted September 26, 2013

Carrillo Elementary School is the best public school there is! I have been there 8 years now with 3 kids going there and have only had amazing teachers and staff for my children. There is a lot of parent involvement also. My children feel safe there and have made great progress in their academics. Carrillo will prepare you for middle school for sure!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2013

Carrillo Elementary has wonderful parents that are willing to volunteer tremendous time and energy. The PTO generates substantial financial resources for the school. However, the teachers do not take advantage of the resources available to help students progress. The school might be ranked as a 10 by the state (#378 in the state) but this is because of the heavy parent involvement. The school number ranking should be hire, but many of the teacher s take this as an opportunity to do less. The school is second to last in ranking for the City of Carlsbad. The rankings for the City of Carlsbad are (#57, #192, #195, #347, #378, # 391).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2012

Despite the potential to be a great school this school is just mediocre. The pieces required to be great are there: good facilities, good students, families who value education and have adequate financial resources. Unfortunately they just can't seem to put it all together. The previous principal was fantastic. The current principal has allowed the school to slide into mediocrity. The teachers range from amazing, to pleasant, to lazy, to down right mean...many seem like they are just going through the motions. Each year the school year begins with enthusiasm, by mid-year the students are ridiculously behind schedule and then there is a mad rush to catch up in the spring before STAR testing begins. There are many parents who are willing to give their time selflessly to help in the classroom. The PTO is another story. They seems to do a good job raising money each year and there are undoubtedly many hard working, well-meaning parents involved with this goal. However, many of the PTO leaders seem to use their positions as a means to get what they want for their own kids (class placement, etc). It's disappointing to see the unrealized potential of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2012

Carrillo has changed so incredibly much over the past few years and I m sad to say not for the better! The amount of money and fundraising they constantly badger us for is outrageous. Carrillo also wastes so much learning time on flag salutes with awards related to running and behavior. But, the kids who do get Triple E s and Honor Roll get shunned and receive their awards in their classrooms to not upset or discourage those students who aren t making the grades. What happened to rewarding and promoting academics? By showing ALL kids academic awards and not just cheesy running and behavior awards helps instill and prepare our kids for the real world!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2012

Carrillo is a great school...perfect? Of course not. Just like any school it has its issues but all in all it is a really good school and my kids are getting a great education. I would suggest to parents to get more involved. The pressure to donate is only there because the state is taking away more and more. I would suggest to some of the reviewers to join the grant committee or help in raising funds for the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2012

Pros: Staff super friendly and seem very competent, great social atmosphere for kids, teachers doing a great job with many students and limited resources Cons: The funding crunch has caused the school to do questionable things to students while chasing money. If a child misses 5 days in a year, they are barred from a trip to a pool/water park. We cut trips to visit family (including elderly residents she may not have much time with) short to meet this, but when I chaperoned the party (on May 29), I saw at least 5 kids in just my kids class get to watch the classmates leave for the party while they were effectively publicly shunned for something they (as first granders) have no control over. Kids are also made to attend repeated hyped-up fundraising assemblies, a few of which would be fine with me, but the pressure on kids (and their families) is constant, and as with the pool party, the kids are made to watch as other kids get prizes etc for getting more money. Be prepared to spend a considerable amount not to have the staff make your children feel like they have failed and let down their school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2012

This school is doing wonders for my child socially. We move a lot and I usually had issues with my daughter's happiness and lack of friends. Not here. The teachers and kids seem to be loving and accepting. It must be that there is little drama coming from upper class homes. Whatever it is, it makes a happy student. She is involved in the activities. There are many to choose from. Improvements to be made include the lack of parking. Maybe they should make a parking structure for the regulars. Also, children who excel at academics need to be recognized and encouraged more. Do they have a GATEs program? Many of the children there are from successful brainiacs, despite how good the school is, this is a great influence on the high test scores. So do we have to move back to the ghetto to get some recognition? I hope they do something. Put it in gear, please.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2012

Let's do a comparison. First, let me say that community is a school starts with the principal, then trickles down. If the principal is not at the TOP of her game, then the system fails. At Carrillo, the principal does the minimum possible because this is a job, not a career for her. She collects her paycheck as does the least that she can. This trickles down to the front office. Please do not something like smile, it may hurt and you don't get paid to smile. Why is this important? Is a school of 900+ students if the first thing you see is a grumpy face how do you feel all day? At Alvin Dunn Elementary, the principal knows her students, smiles, her job is her career, her happy nature affects everyone around her. The front office staff goes above and beyond to assist, and make you feel welcome that you are at their school. Such an awesome difference. We have attended Twin Oaks Elementary, San Marcos Elementary, Alvin Dunn Elementary, and Carrillo Elementary. If you based choosing a school on principals, we would never return to Carrillo. She should retire.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2011

Carrillo is a great place for kids to go to school! There are fabulous teachers and tons of parent help! The campus is always clean and there are tons of afterschool programs to join ! With Education being a sore subject in CA--- you would never know it at Carrillo! They truly love the kids and that is what matters most! A great community an a fabulous place for your child to go to school! My son loves to go to school everyday and can't get there early enough! That says alot about a school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2011

A lot of the reviews are correct, this is a good school but with a lot of faults. The teachers are in general very good and some are excellent, but I agree that any sort of complaint contrary to how the school is run falls on deaf ears with those in charge. They do push the children, but some are progressed when they should obviously be held back. They lack severally in science and arts, they claim to be focused on math and English but spend a ridiculous amount of time at flag salutes rewarding those who run, surely this is extra curricular and academics should come first, which it does not. They rely heavily on parent funding and participation which does provide many programs but gives those 'clicky' parents too much power in the school and certain staff pander to those 'in the click'. Class sizes are too big and students get lost if they don't cause problems, there is no provision for those who are not struggling to excel, just meet the requirements. The parking lot is not designed for the parents of 900 kids with no school bus it can take 40 minutes just to get to you child for pick up. My children are happy and learning and this year have amazing teachers to thank.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2011

We just moved to this community and I was very excited about the school. I was surprised at the high level of reverse discrimination. We are fair skinned but from another country with another language spoken at home other than english. I was shocked to see a Chinese program only offered to a selective group of youngsters bc a fund came from a private Chinese money. I see other AMericans of White color (many from all different nationalities mixed) but no particular class offered for them. Instead there money goes to the entire school program to facilitate all other children. IF the money collected came from the nationalities of other origins such as German, IRish, Denmark, Australian etc.... then only those children should be allowed to participate! The school does not even have a art or science room and parents teach art. The school is over crowded and they provide a room for a Chinese class to take place. Then looking at the registration form, why should it matter your race? THey have every nationality of Asian listed (about 20), and Hispanic, And I am other white. I am from a foreign country and we do not speak english but my children are learning and have no choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2011

This school has highly challenging academic programs and some of the best test scores in the district. Most children, including mine, perform above grade level. Unfortunately, any concerns I have brought to the staff have been met with defensiveness and denial. Other parents have shared the same experiences. The rule here is "don't rock the boat."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2011

This school is a great school for children they keep them all motivated and the parent volunteer is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2010

Carrillo is a great school that continues to provide my children a well-rounded education. I have one in 5th and another in 1st. Thanks to wonderful parent support we have been able to hold onto a music program, computer lab, reading program, and art. Many other schools in our area don't have these programs anymore. The running club has made physical activity fun for the kids. The teachers and staff are dedicated to do what is best for the kids. Parent involvement is high and encouraged at this school. I am thankful for the past six years I have had here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2010

This school has suffered a big loss. With the previous principal gone the school/staff is just not the same. The overall tone and atmosphere has changed. We love our teachers my daughter is in first and has 2 fantastic teachers (team teaching is a wonderful chance for my child to learn/be taught/guided/and have her needs met by two qualified people; an extra set of eyes to make sure she is getting exactly what she needs) My other daughter is in 4th and loves her teacher as well. Hopefully the district can get it together and help what was a connected happy school get back on track. There could be more emphasis on academics and less on running.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2010

Great teachers, great staff from the principle down.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2010

My daughter went here for a short time this year, unfortunately we had to move and she couldn't stay at this school. I already miss this place and the teacher she had for third grade. My daughter who suffers from ADHD and usually hates school, for the first time really started enjoying it and was excited to go every day, her teacher was so patient with her and not once did this school try to talk me into putting my daughter in special education classes due to her ADHD like her previous school. The only complaint I have is the drop off/pick up process. This really does need some work, but other than that the school and teachers are fantastic. After all what other school has two peacocks roaming the campus freely. They are adorable and even play with the children. As for the principle, I met her a couple of times briefly yet she remembered my name and my daughter s and was always anxious to address any questions we had. .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2010

We moved from a small town, smaller school. This is our first year here, and the school does offer a lot of incentives for running and reading, but not much for Math or Science. They have a wonderful list of afterschool activities and a reading computer lab program. What happend to Art? Parent volunteers teaching it???? This school seems to pull in a lot of money go get a good art teacher, rotate the classes through it and have the parents volunteer there. It is a 900+ student school with a lot of parent involvement but lacking a real personal connection/feel to the parents or students. Not really a fan of team teaching particularly in the younger grade levels. Younger ones need stability and a consistent role model. However the teachers are fantastic. And the traffic for pick up/ drop off needs to be improved. Still feeling out new principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

Great Staff, awesome PTO, always trying to be the best and give the best to our children, we love it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2009

I'm a parent and overall its a good school (in this area). They have many awards (be on time, tough worker, be responsible) and a lot of reading/running awards which is great. However, they seem to not encourage science/math because most of the awards are for reading/running (they give math awards in higher grade levels). As it is, most kids are lacking in math/science skills and if there is no incentive at an early age, they may have difficulties in middle school. A new principal is coming in next year (Mr. Wise is retiring) so hopefully this will not be overlooked. I don't think it would hurt to make the kids think that math/science is cool.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

928

Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

928

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

192 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

192 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
76%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Females81%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner39%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate83%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)40%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to state73%

Math

All Students85%
Females87%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learner61%
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate91%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to state91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students79%
Females82%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner75%
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students86%
Females89%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged78%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disability85%
Students with no reported disability86%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females91%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disability93%
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate100%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to state83%

Math

All Students90%
Females88%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino81%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged81%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability70%
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate100%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to state92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Females96%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino90%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disability92%
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students88%
Females86%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability100%
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)86%
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students90%
Females90%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disability100%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)93%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 66% 26%
Hispanic 16% 52%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 11%
Black 3% 6%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 16%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2875 Poinsettia Lane
Carlsbad, CA 92009
Website: Click here
Phone: (760) 290-2900

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