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GreatSchools Rating

Mission Avenue Open Elementary School

Public | K-6

 
 

Living in Carmichael

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $190,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $870.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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41 reviews of this school


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Posted June 23, 2014

As a former student, I can't help but be just a little bit biased to my own experiences. Mission was the best possible place for me to attend. I would not be the person I am today if I had gone to any other school. In my seven years there, I had an amazing time. I'm still friends with some of the people I was friends with there when I was five. I haven't attended Mission for a while now, but I still come to visit and I'm always welcomed. I still feel nostalgic for the many amazing field trips I went on every year, and hum the songs I learned in my one year of choir. This is all my own personal experience of course. Everyone is different, but Mission is about taking what makes you different and using it to make you the best you ca be. Besides, who really wants to go to Merimont?


Posted August 1, 2013

As a grand parent I have been on several of my granddaughters field trips. The most impressive one was an overnight in the Sacramento Zoo. The zoo staff was very complimentary of the Mission Avenue staff and even waived some of their restrictions on overnights because of Mission Avenues outstanding programs


Posted May 4, 2012

Sometimes I can't believe that most people (many are) aren't knocking the doors down to get their child into this school. While there are many great schools within the San Juan Unified School District and the surrounding area, this school stands out for for reasons including academics. The learning at this school is enhanced by the projects, field trips and the parent involvement that each student experiences. This school is a community and a great example in today's world. To put it simply, a school official emphasized that this school offers a private school education but is a public school in the San Juan Unified School District. http://www.sanjuan.edu/MissionAvenueOpen.cfm?subpage=157900
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2011

I've been a parent at Mission for many years now and Mission used to be a really great school. Administration changes have taken the "open" out of it and for me, the cliques of parents and the total inequities that take place on a daily basis ("rules" or not), got very old to me and my family. The elementary grades are wonderful, starting with Kindergarten. Many students leave after fifth grade, rather than staying for sixth grade for many reasons. This is a school where one of the parents should not work so they can be in the loop of favorites with teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2011

The teachers at this school are great. The only problem that stood out for my child and I was the fact that sometimes there was a lot of clicks and some minor bullying. There was also a little too much parent participation to the point of gossip and clickiness among the parents as well. Overall my daughter's experience academically was excellent but socially she was lacking. She loves the new school she is attending socially and academically.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2010

I attended Mission many years ago and now my oldest son is lucky enough to attend, everything is as great as I remember. The teachers, principal, assignments, parental involvement and field trips are fantastic! My son is at the end of his first grade year and we were lucky enough to have Miss Rausch as his teacher. We look forward to what second grade brings our way. We are truely blessed to have or son attend this school and our youngest in a couple years!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2010

I loved Mission when my daughter first started there. It is a very good regular school. Changes in the past 4 years have really removed a lot of what was special in the 'old days' when it WAS a special school. For kids who are self directed, this is a great school. Lots of field trips. Good for high acheiving kids too. But if your child needs any services or help, you had better be ready to fight for it. And smart kids need services too sometimes, speech for example. Many parents leave Mission instead of fighting for help.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2009

Mission Ave is an amazing elementary school, and I could not have had a better experience. The teachers and programs are excellent, and Mission produces truly unique kids. I could not advise a better school to send your child to.


Posted November 3, 2009

A totally wonderful school - the Best!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

Mission Avenue Open Elementary is an awesome school. It follows the Open Philosophy which believes children learn best with hand-on and real world learning. They take incredible field trips, some multi-night. They emphasize public speaking and presentations. I have heard high school teachers comment that kids from Mission Avenue have a lot of confidence and are easily able to talk to and relate to adults. Kids love attending Mission Avenue. This is not an ordinary, run-of-the-mil,l reading, writing, math, no fun school. There are too many special events to list here, but suffice it to say each day is a new, fun adventure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2009

I have two boys at this school one in KG and one in 2nd Grade. Teachers and Principal support the open philosophy with tons of extra curricula enrichment options and really get parents involved. Children are challenged to move forward in their learning no matter where they start. The teachers empower the students to have a presence and a voice. How can kids loose if they are both smart and confident. The expectation is that your child will do great things! Graduates show that is true.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 19, 2009

After several years at Mission, we are having a very hard time deciding if we want to keep our children here. It is a very average school, and we didn't sign up for average. What was failed to be stated at our initial review is that Mission functions best for families with a stay-at-home parent. The loose, fun classroom structure works better when a parent is present. As I've seen in the last two years, with more parents having to return to work, the class environment is suffering a lot. And sad to say, the test scores support what I'm saying.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 15, 2008

After seeing reviews criticizing Mission's lack of 'challenge for highly gifted students', I feel I must say something. My child could have gone to a Rapid Learner school but chose Mission instead and we both loved it. She did not miss out on any kind of 'additional learning' RL claimed to provide. She got into the IB program with ease, and is still handling that program very well. Just because Mission doesn't have an official 'high achiever' program doesn't mean it doesn't have programs or ways to challenge kids and make them better people.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2008

We are a former military family and have moved all over this state and gone to schools in many different areas and I have to say that Mission Avenue is one of the best schools I have seen by far. My son is challenged on a daily basis. Curriculum is hands on, which is how my child learns best. Having parent involvement and participation in the classroom means that my child can learn at his pace and not be forced to fit some learning curve based on all students in the class. It is a wonderful experience to know the faces and families of my children's school mates and to have him grow from Kinder to 6th grade with the same group of kids. Drawbacks? Parents are committed but cliques are definitely present. A lot of work outside of classroom for kids and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2008

I have 3 kids at this school. All children in the US should have the opportunity to attend a school such as Mission. Hillary was right, 'It does take a village.' There's a job for everyone, working parent or not. I believe some of the recent poor reviews come from parents with disruptive children. I volunteer in 3 classrooms each week and I feel I 'see' the workings of the education my children receive. Children are challenged and the kids that need extra help get it. Yes, it can be like high school for some of the parents but the majority of adults are there for the kids. You want your child to fondly remember their elementary school years, send them to Mission. BTW, the principal is the best one we've had in the 6 years I've been there. She responds to my issues; obviously, she must follow district policy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2008

Mission Avenue is a great school. I have been very pleased with it. My son, who is GATE-identified, is challenged and loves school. He learns through a variety of methods, and there is always something new and interesting going on. His teachers have been great, and there are always many parents helping out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2008

Mission is a disappointment, the upper grades 5th and 6th have weak teachers and little to offer children during such a important growing period. I was disappointed that the teachers didn't act as good role models and you could tell they didn't get along that good. This effects our childrens learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2008

Mission has been such a disappointment. The administration is ineffective when dealing with hard issues such as 'problem children and teachers'. Kindergarten and third grade have been great experiences but all the other grades have provided terrible experiences. I truly wish I would have chosen Mariemont, Cowan, Del Dayo or even Del Paso Manor. I've been told by many friends that the Principal's at those schools will at least put their foot down when something happens that is unacceptable. Mission isn't what it used to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2008

i had an amazing experience at this school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 18, 2007

This school is only designed for the child who could pretty much teach them selves. Not enough emphasis is focused on the foundation of learning. It's all about the experience ( field trips). The parent volunteering is out of control. If I could do it over again, I would put my child in a fundamental school and leave the field trips for family time. Then they would have an education, and we would have family memories.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

841

Change from
2012 to 2013

-35

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

841

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-35

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
69%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
74%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
74%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students48%
Females53%
Males43%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability49%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only49%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate44%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to state43%

Math

All Students71%
Females72%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to state57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females57%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)53%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate48%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate68%
Parent education - declined to state29%

Math

All Students65%
Females72%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate68%
Parent education - declined to state50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females69%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to state79%

Math

All Students75%
Females74%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)54%
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to state71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females83%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to state64%

Math

All Students63%
Females50%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Non-economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to state36%

Science

All Students66%
Females63%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to state73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females82%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Females57%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 80%
Hispanic 11%
Asian 3%
Two or more races 3%
Black 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 22%N/AN/A
English language learners 3%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2925 Mission Avenue
Carmichael, CA 95608
Phone: (916) 575-2362

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