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GreatSchools Rating

Patricia Nixon Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 682 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted March 5, 2014

This school is ok. When you raise your hand with one other student too, she looks at you for like 20 seconds and then calls on the other kid. Seriously? and sometimes, the teacher calls on the same student over and over. There are like 40 kids in a class and one teacher! How are students supposed to learn?!


Posted January 28, 2014

My son has learning issues ADHD also. He is in kindergarten and is at the low point. I have watched his teacher in class and noticed that she does not include him with class participation at all. He struggles with reading and there is no extra help for that only for kids who are well at reading. I thought that with his struggles that he would get the help he needs but that hasn't happened. I was told they don't offer extra help for kids with reading issues. I have been disappointed with the school and his tear her all around. There is no extra help for the kids with these issue at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2014

hello hello, parents, do not blame your school and teachers. spend more time with your kids :) love and genuine education starts at home. if this two important things are practiced and applied,you are not gonna scapegoat your school and teachers, i love you :) Mrs.Ortiz is the BEST PRINCIPLE!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2013

My daughter is in K and im so disappointed in this school. I had heard so many good things and found out like wise. I was told that if your child is struggle they don't offer to help with them to pick up there speed. I was told they only help those who are at speed of reading and the lower students don't receive that help. There are 28 to 30 students to 1 teacher. I have volunteered and seen first hand how it is to much for one person to handle. The play ground is worse because it's one teacher for 120 students watching over the kids and it gets very wild on the play ground things go on that the one teacher can't see. And as the other post said Mrs. Ortiz is not the best principal. I would not recommend this school to anyone
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2013

My other review was taken down. I guess it spoke the truth too much. However I had three children pass through this school so I dealt with this school for a total of 12 years. I totally agree with the other reviews that there is nothing the school will do to help struggling students. NOTHING. The worst part is that teachers use parent helpers who end up actually teaching small groups of students. Thus, the students do not receive the education that they deserve and are entitled to with parents teaching. If you are a parent, take your child out of Nixon and go somewhere else. Cerritos Elementary is an option. Not Leal. That school is overrated as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2013

This is our first year at Nixon so I'm not too familiar with everything but thus far I have no complaints. Well maybe just a few...as much hype as the school gets I expected more organized classroom and cleaner. Outside faucets (more than one) for the kids to wash their hands after play would be nice. And 28 kids per teacher seems like a lot for one person to handle....but with this economy I'm guessing its like this everywhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2013

I am a parent my child went to Nixon for one year I don't recommend this school. I agree with all the comments about the principal she is a horrible leader. Mrs ortiz needs to focus on the children's education not yelling at parents! And directing traffic However most of the parents are really nice and so are their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2013

This has been my son's school for one year. I agree with the other reviews about the school washing their hands of responsibility for children who are not performing at grade level. Not only that, but they do not offer enrichment learning for the younger graders who are accelerated learners. It's been a sad year of my son not having learned much because the school did not meet him at his level, whether behind in a core subject or accelerated in another core subject. I would not recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2013

I am not pleased with the education my children are receiving at Nixon. Nixon does little to help children who are falling below grade level. They seem to wash their hands of these children and focus their attention on children who perform above grade level. I asked my daughters teacher if the school could provide my daughter with any additional help with her reading. I was told no! The teacher said that Nixon does not offer any type of intervention for children who are struggling. I know that the teachers are trying their best but I feel that the real problem facing this school is the principal. I believe she is more concerned about test scores than helping children who are struggling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2012

Wow...why is it just assumed that a parent must have not had contact with the teacher or Principal. Also to suggest that a parent can not object to something and should not participate is missing the point. Some parents of Nixon students are TEACHERS themselves and even administrators and want the best for their child not just a label to make a school look good. Don't get mad if someone makes a comment that you don't like when clearly there are problems with Nixon and ABCUSD. You should care about all students not just your own. One day you might have an issue with a teacher or administrator.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2012

My children attended Nixon from the first year it was open through their matriculation. My granddaughter is currently attending Nixon. I could not ask for a better learning environment. The principal is dedicated and attends almost every school event. I find the teachers to be well qualified and attentive. Problems are dealt with in an appropriate and timely manner. As in every school there have been teachers we liked better than others, but by far we have been pleased with the mix and talent here at Nixon. Now that they have been granted academy status their performing arts and music activities really shine. Yes, there are numerous fundraisers. That is a result of budget setbacks in education statewide. For those who object - don't participate; nobody forces you. Feel free to sit back and let others sponsor your children. Regarding the kids moving from rom to room; the variety provided by moving to another room provides exposure to more stimuli and develops maturity and responsibility. I'm sure some of the criticisms by other reviewers have resulted from singular unresolved problems that could (should) have been resolved by parent contact with the teacher or principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2012

Pat Nixon used to be a good school when the previous principal was there. Teachers really cared about the students no matter where you came from, what your background was, and what other issue you may have. Now since they are a magnet multi media arts school, everyone has this false idea that the school is magnificent. Really talk to people who have children that have gone through this school. Talk to people that know about what a quality education really is. It is not doing the same performances year after year. It is not employing teachers who have no experience in a particular grade level and making the kids suffer. It is not about making thousands of dollars in fundraisers. Think about the KIDS. Put them first.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2010

Pat Nixon is, in my opinion, one of the best educational institutions of its kind. My daughter is very happy there and I'm even happier. The teachers in this school are great, they each offer a unique, yet personal approach to my child's education. They take time to make sure that I understand where she stands academically and where she could be. The school has a new principal (in her second year) that impressed me as person that really demonstrates strong leadership qualities. I like the fact that she can articulate her vision for this great school. One of the things I like most about this school is its curriculum and diverse programs. They do more than just cram a bunch of 'State Standards' into my kid- they are also very serious about enriching her experience with wonderful and innovative approaches to math, reading, social studies, and science.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2009

Pat Nixon has been my son's school for the past 2 years. He started in first grade and now will be entering 3rd grade. I found first grade teachers to be extremely organized and work in bringing the students a full experinece of all areas of curriculum and teaching styles by rotating themselves depending on subject taught. In second grade we found the education my son experienced a tough one. P. Nixon makes the students move from room to room for every subject of the curriculum. Teachers don't move from their rooms but they make all 6 year olds move! We found this 'high school' mentality some what challenging for many students. We also thought that the instructional minutes that takes students to move from room to room every hour diminished their instructional time. We will continue to work with teahers and the new principal to make sure our son receives
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2008

This is great school. My son attended this school and his academic and behavior improved a lot. Teachers are nice and friendly. They use creative incentive programs to motivate kids to read more books .....etc. My son love to go to shcool. Thank you for giving him a happy learning experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2006

My daughter attended Pat Nixon from Kindergarten to the end of first grade and although this school sets expectations high, not all students are a good 'fit' for that particular setting. For their reading instruction, Nixon has incorporated 'levled' reading groups meaning that if your child doesn't read a certain number of words per minute or doesn't test in the higher category they are grouped with lower students for reading instruction leaving little time to interact with peers who read at a higher level. My daughter was sent to another teacher for reading instruction every day and was in a classroom with ten other students, even though her reading improved throughout the year. Nixon offers a variety of shows/songs for parents to watch but a lot of classroom instruction time is spent rehearsing these shows not leaving a lot of time for state standards.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2005

All three of my children have attended Nixon elementary school and each have shown a greater level of wanting to learn. I give this thanks to the teachers, principal and staff. They were always encouraging their students and challenging them to reach high. They were also willing to give of their time to help these students grow. The school itself offered classes in Music, Arts sports, dance and a variety of after school programs either to enhance your academics or just to have fun and socialize. My third grader was shown how the stock market works by hands on activities. They watched the newspaper daily and checked 'their' stocks to see if they were growing or falling. They also built models of cities and voted on a mayor. They were shop owners of students. I wish other schools would learn what my children have learned from nixon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2005

I am so proud to call Pat Nixon my childrens elementary. They have awsome extra curricular activity such as Band (which students can join as early as 4th grade), dance, our famouse chorus (they get to sing at many fun places), track, chess club, student councile (what a great experience for the students)and so many more.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

879

Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

879

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females82%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipino81%
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner68%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)70%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to state82%

Math

All Students79%
Females77%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipino88%
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner64%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to state91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females74%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asian79%
Filipino81%
Hispanic or Latino72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged66%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)57%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students84%
Females83%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipino94%
Hispanic or Latino78%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Females83%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learner75%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students71%
Females75%
Males66%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)57%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate68%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females84%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asian82%
Filipino90%
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learner50%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students61%
Females69%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asian77%
Filipino65%
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learner45%
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students81%
Females85%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipino85%
Hispanic or Latino84%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner64%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females67%
Males85%
African American50%
Asian95%
Filipino100%
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students57%
Females45%
Males69%
African American36%
Asian80%
Filipino86%
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)32%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Asian 40% 11%
Hispanic 27% 51%
White 14% 27%
Black 12% 7%
Two or more races 6% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 34%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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19600 Jacob Avenue
Cerritos, CA 90703
Phone: (562) 860-6549

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