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GreatSchools Rating

Michael G. Wickman Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 946 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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28 reviews of this school


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Posted April 2, 2014

the staff makes every effort to take advantage of the diversity of thew student population to benefit everyone
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2012

Reading the post from 10/07, not sure what you are talking about. My 6th grade student is fully engaged, loves her teacher, and is doing exceptionally well. The 6th grade teachers are doing an incredible job, have you ever audited one of their classes, or are you basing your opinion on what your child is telling you?I have been in the classroom, and if you cannot appreciate all that these teachers do, then you know nothing about education. Note taking, although not exciting, is a required skill in jr. high and high school, the students need to learn how to master this skill. That is the purpose of the note taking. Perhaps the "no depth or mastery of the skill" you speak of, is solely something our child is dealing with.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

Wow, just reading the post from 10-7. This person has no idea what they are talking about. Probably a student that zaps the positive energy from EVERY teacher they have ever had. Not to mention is probably a daily problem! Unbelieveable. Just go to another school and let us all appreciate what Wickamn has to offer!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2012

Well, I just spent 2 hours on a Saturday night reteaching or should I say teaching science content to my child. The 6 grade teachers engage the students in mindless lectures and note taking which result in little retention of the information. There is little variety in their instructional approaches. The only concern is to quickly cover the material. There is no depth or attention to mastery of the material. We pay entirely too much in taxes to receive such mediocre services. The only thing that will save our children is the national push to the Common Core standards.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2012

Some people say that Wickman's students are cold and unfriendly, but that is certainly not the case. They only seem like that because many of the students have went to Wickman from kindergarten to now so they are bound to have many friends in the school.


Posted January 21, 2011

It's interesting how different experiences can be from one student to the next! I have been a Wickman parent for several years now (2 children attend) and feel that my children are in an excellent academic environment. The teachers are loving, attentive, educated, motivated and inspiring. They are approachable and create a welcoming and safe feeling throughout the classrooms and the school itself. One thing I read below is that "the best teachers went to OPA (a new charter school)", which is completely false. There is not one teacher who left by choice last year. Parental involvement is exceptional, that is true. I am amazed at the levels parents rise to to help their children at school. But I believe that the education of our children is most definitely, a group effort. Homework, for my children, is what it is intended to be: a reinforcement of concepts taught in the classroom. I feel fortunate that my children have the opportunity to attend such an outstanding academic institution, surrounded by an excellent and loving staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2010

My children have been attending Wickman since fall of 2009 & I strongly believe the school's performance is a direct result of the highly motivated parents whos children attend the school - more than anything else. Wickman has lost a significant % of it's highest achieving students & its' highly motivated families to a new local charter school with a strong emphasis on computers & second languages (asian flight). This school year has already started with a serious overcrowding issue & terribly high ratio which will no doubt result in even less instruction time for the students. It appears that the most motivated teachers have already left or are leaving, along with the very short lived vice principle. The school's commitment to academic excellence and over all development seems to be waning in light of it's competition. We'll see how the school year goes, but problems are clearly on the horizon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 4, 2009

I love this school!Its api score is about 912 and it has great staff and students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2009

My children love Wickman! It is a great schools with many opportunities for the children and parents to be involved. I am a little concerned with the amount of homework in the upper grades. My son who is a great student can spend from 4:30 pm until 10:00 pm doing homework/ studying for a test. We have had some amazing teachers and even though I believe the homework is a bit excessive I still appreciate all the work the teacher's and parents put into making it one big family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2009

I am very happy with this school atmosphere and teaching level is very great
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2009

The school is great. Teachers are very friendly and parents are well informed of what's going on in their classes/school. There are alot of parents volunteer at school. So far I like the teachers that my kid had/has, love their creative teaching style.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2009

Amazing school! Wonderful teachers! Better than Country Springs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2009

I am a new parent to Wickman. It took a while for my child and me to warm up to the school climate. Many parents and children at the school seem a bit cold and unfriendly. Though there are many friendly parents as well. I'm thinking of transferring my child. She is having a hard time finding 'true' friendship at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2008

I believe that Wickman has the right idea towards academic success but I feel a lot of it is left in the parent's hands. Homework should be a review of the day's lesson, not a family project. I also feel that preferential treatment is given (to the parents and students of those parents)that volunteer often and not given out equally to all. Awards etc. We'd all love to be stay-at-home parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2008

Great teachers.studentsand staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2007

Wickman has excellent funding and resources. I am amazed that the teachers are at a 31:1 ratio of students. I feel the principal and vice principal are mainly interested in out-testing the other school. The staff is extremely rude.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2007

Academic programs are tiered for only the top 10%. The work expected is way beyond other schools and is often left to parents to teach and complete. Limited inclass instruction for 'projects'.Many projects are a competition between parents. Parent involvement is only for the 'elite'. School is overcrowded. Some teachers are great, others should not be teaching. The quality of education depends on the track you are on. If you have children with special needs, run as fast as you can to a different school. It is a nightmare to get services from the majority of the staff, including principal and asst. principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2007

We just moved from Washington and my child is doing better and better everyday, I like the fact that this school focuses on academics. The Principal is involved in every aspect of his school, my daughter's teacher is also great! Thank you for been so supportive of my child and the other children at Wickman.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2007

This school has everything you may possibly require for your child to suceed in class and any where else!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2007

Wickman's focus is more on academic success, at any cost. Both students and parents are overwhelmed by homework overload. What I like least is that when the students are off track they are given assignments. This should be like their summer since they are not on a traditional calendar. Students and parents need a little R&R to rejuvenate. Some teachers ignore the students when they have questions or need clarification. How do you expect a child to learn if their questions go unanswered?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

941

Change from
2012 to 2013

0

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

941

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

0

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

140 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females90%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipino91%
Hispanic or Latino84%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)89%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students89%
Females92%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipino82%
Hispanic or Latino87%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability93%
English learner92%
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females80%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disability36%
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students93%
Females96%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability83%
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females89%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged84%
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disability69%
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females94%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability85%
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)89%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females97%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipino88%
Hispanic or Latino84%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability64%
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to state73%

Math

All Students88%
Females88%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipino100%
Hispanic or Latino82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disability75%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to state64%

Science

All Students87%
Females87%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipino94%
Hispanic or Latino73%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disability75%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to state64%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Females93%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disability54%
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)86%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to state100%

Math

All Students87%
Females85%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disability36%
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to state95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 30% 51%
White 30% 27%
Asian 29% 11%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Black 4% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 10%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Donald Wilson
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Fax number
  • (909) 597-2726
School leaders can update this information here.

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16250 Pinehurst Drive
Chino Hills, CA 91709
Website: Click here
Phone: (909) 393-3774

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