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GreatSchools Rating

High Tech Elementary Chula Vista School

Charter | K-5

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Parent involvement

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted June 26, 2014

Once parents reconcile that HTe's problem based curriculum differs from traditional teaching, they may understand the tremendous advantages such an education offers. Via inquiry based learning, students are able to have multiple experiences on a topic and partake in both reflection and critical analysis successfully. The teachers DO lay the groundwork for basic tenets such as critical textual analysis and number sense. Families then need to "supplement" , not "supplant" these ideas. This extraneous support by caregivers should occur, regardless of the school. To suggest that HTe does not offer "good teaching" or instruction is unfortunate. Though anecdotally, I submit that my own child's growth this past year was significant. I attribute this to her teacher's strategies, the social climate of the school, the social constructivism approach (inquiry based learning) ,the HUB (where she would often be found until six as we work) and our work at home. The curriculum and teaching is not subpar as another reviewer suggested. It's innovative and challenging. However, this style may not be for all students. Parents need to know their charges.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2014

I cannot believe that parents are expected to "supplement" the incredible lack of good teaching at this school. We were so excited to have been selected and to be part of the" few ones" /lucky chosen. I honestly wish we had not been selected. My son's academic skills significantly dropped. He had fun. But that is such a disservice to our kids. Luckily for this school, many of the kids come from affluent families that can hire tutors or get involved with kids education. Now I have to pay for tutor to catch him up over the summer. What a shame. Something needs to change with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2014

I am a HTE parent & credentialed teacher w/ 14 yrs. experience in public & charter schools. I enrolled my child w/ HTE b/c I wanted her creativity to grow. I understand the demand this school places on parent involvement. It should be emphasized in every school system. However, parents aren't expected to supplement their child's learning, but to make up for what the teachers are *lacking* in quality instruction. NOT EVERY PARENT IS A CREDENTIALED TEACHER. It's the teacher's professional job to offer parents a GUIDE to help their student's learning, not to expect parents to take over while teachers engage students in arts & crafts. What's the point of teaching students how to make a rocket out of household materials if they don't even know the part's purpose? The lack of quality reading & math instruction are evident. Many Kindergartners enter first grade barely learning how to sound out letters. This isn't preparing our children for college or careers. The POLs help with public speaking, but what hiring manager would give a second glance to a r sum with spelling errors? What college professor has time to teach students how to take notes? Read "Checking for Understanding," pg. 73
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2014

I have a relative whose children attend HT Elementary and HT Middle. I've experienced schools that are heavily test-based, so I was thrilled at the idea of a project-based school. After seeing what HTE's done to my relative's children, I have to discourage parents from enrolling their children here unless your child is already an independent learner. Perhaps this is just the Chula Vista location, but HTE teachers do not emphasize fundamentals in reading/writing, & focus more on fun activities than genuine teaching. My niece entered Kindergarten last year. She is in first grade now & doesn't even recognize words like "said." Her older sister started Kindergarten in a nearby public school & is a very strong reader. My neighbor's son & a teacher friend's daughter are Kindergartners this year. Both parents have told me there isn't much reading or writing going on. The upper grades aren't much better, sadly. The students are working on projects, yes, but there's a difference between telling someone what you're DOING and explaining what you're LEARNING. A project-based curriculum isn't a replacement for rigorous reading and writing. They are part of college/career readiness
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2013

I Pulled my son out of this school after only 2 weeks of 5th grade. He was one of the 'lucky ones' selected well into the school year, but this was because of parents were already pulling their children out of this school. From the very first day my son was frustrated and embarrased that in 5th grade he had to do circle time, sit on the carpet and have teachers read and act-up 2nd grade level books to them. Most of his classmates did not remember how to do a simple fraction or division. When I interviewed with his teacher and asked about math skills and preparedness I was flat out told that any math or writing skills was something the parent had to do with the child at home because that wasn't 'that' type of school. So, my son found himself painting masks, building towers with paper cups and reading 2nd grade level books at school for 2 weeks before he went back to his homeschool. To this day he still reminds me of what I did to him. He is now a 7th grader
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2013

My school is fantastic. I love that along with the academic learning, they learn real world skills that will help them in the future. The staff is extremely caring and supportive. They are still young and are working on improving school parent communication, but are on the right track.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2013

Don't get me wrong I truly love high tech and how they work but the parking is just a huge problem ! Plus the staff does nothing about it. Do they not know ... Very disappointed ! I saw the director and staff out there doing nothing and I was waiting outside on a do not stop anywhere area .. which my risks go up for getting a ticket ! I was in line for 45 mins just trying to enter to pick up my elementary student because one car wouldn't move. Need a better picking up system!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2013

We feel very fortunate to be part of HTe School, everyone truly cares about the children, it's very unique there's no comparison to other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2012

My children love HTe and their teachers! From the director on down, everyone truly cares about my children's learning. My kids tackle their projects with enthusiasm and I am no longer have to worry about homework packets that they used to bring home from their other school. They dreaded them and really never learned anything from them! Here, they are able to think critically, imaginatively, and analytically. They have not only grown academically, but socially as well. The High Tech High Five core values really teach them how to be better students in school, and better people in the real world. It's truly amazing the growth I've seen! The only thing I hope for is more parent involvement. It always seems to be the same parents who always volunteer, which is wonderful, but there are so many opportunities to help out. If you made the effort to get your child into this school, please do more to support it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2012

I have two children at this school and this is their second year attending HTE. Both of my children have grown academically, socially, and emotionally. This school pays attention to all of their students in fact they have SLC's where students have a conference with the parent and teacher and tell you their strengths and weaknesses. Students are also given access to the latest technology, and given enrichment classes in engineering, performing arts, and fine arts. I also highly recommend this school for parents with children who have special needs. This is a full inclusion school, teachers, and academic coach's are very patient and work closely with children in the classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

This is the second year this school has been open. And I am amazed at the dedication of the teachers and staff here. They are not here to teach our children how to take tests, rather they are more interested in teaching them how to solve problems and how to think critically. I can't say enough about what a benefit this has been for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

746

Change from
2012 to 2013

-32

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

746

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-32

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students40%
Females59%
Males21%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino30%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learner20%
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate35%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate40%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students38%
Females44%
Males32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino28%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students31%
Females37%
Males27%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino15%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability34%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)27%
Parent education - college graduate26%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate41%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students56%
Females57%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate43%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students55%
Females59%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino49%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate60%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate55%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students45%
Females46%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino37%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability45%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate41%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate55%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females63%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner17%
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate57%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students28%
Females26%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability28%
English learner17%
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate21%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate17%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate55%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students26%
Females26%
Males25%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability26%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate14%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate17%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate55%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 66%
White 12%
Black 8%
Asian 3%
Two or more races 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 55%N/AN/A
English language learners 19%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 10%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Technology
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Anne Worrall
Fax number
  • (619) 591-2553

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

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  • STEM
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

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  • Technology
School leaders can update this information here.

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1949 Discovery Falls Drive
Chula Vista, CA 91915
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 591-2550

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