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GreatSchools Rating

Rice (Lilian J.) Elementary School

Public | K-6

 

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Living in Chula Vista

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $231,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,270.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted June 9, 2014

All I can say is they need more school activities art music and PE and an open library for their students .and not be so harsh on those students who have excused absence having them on a contract is just BS to me ...that's why it's and excused absence from the doctors..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2011

I went to Lilian J. Rice from 1950 to 1955 Mrs. Krantz was the principal. she was strict but fair. It was a good experience. I'am glad to see that the school is still offering a quality education. JOHN


Posted May 7, 2011

First of all I want to say I volunteer in my children schools. Its the number one thing parent who wants to be involved in their children life should do. At least 1 hour a week! Many of us parents tend to blame the school and praise others, but, if you see what the others have, is PARENTS that SUPPORT their school. My daughter has gone to Rice since she was in K, now she is going to 5th grade. Since last year the school abandoned the uniform policy and kids can now wear regular clothes, something I do not share. A student should identify himself/herself as one. And uniform does that! It is a school that any teacher or staff I have interacted with have always been helpful and friendly specially the vice-principal. I think even if it is a public school, Principal and teachers should be a little harder on parents and ask them to support their school. I think if parents and teachers get together, we can make of Rice a better school, more than it already is.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2011

This school is one of the best, I have my daughter going to this school and she likes it very much, and so do I.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2009

very good schoool my daughter goes to this school and she likes it very much and also likes CART.The education is very good and her teacher helps her her verrrrry much with her math and reading problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2008

I would give many Kudos to the School's Psicologist Dept. Teachers , Administrative Office and Principal. They try very hard to make Llilian J. Rice a better school. The only thing that I would like to recommend is that all the children from Elementery grades should not be all toghether at recess. Children are often pushed by older ones. Kids should be separeted by ages and everything will be much easier for both school personnel and kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2008

I am really pleased with this school all my 3 children attend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2008

My daughter attended school here for 1 year, I now drive her across town. My daughter is an advanced student and has been skipped ahead a grade at her new school. When she attended Rice she was oftentimes ignored by her teachers because she is self disciplined and well behaved. She was put off to the side with coloring pages so the teachers could focus on non English speaking students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2007

I think this school is above average. I enjoy the CART rotations. This school keeps you occupied with different activities. For example the Liscense Plate Club and Square Dancing and the soccer club. The bad thing is, that there is no girls basketball team this year! Anyways, I like the teachers. But I dont like the environment. At recess, there are people using bad langauge and pushing eachother. When you have a stomach ache or a heade ache etc, the nurse just tells you to lie down and rest. If you got hurt, they just put ice on it and dont care. I think that is what this school needs to improve on.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 30, 2007

My son was there last year and we move the area, we had to enroll him a in different school and we requested a transfer. It was denied since my child was not an A student at that school. I spoke with the principal and with no care ignore my feeling about my child going to that school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2006

My child is in kindergarden at Rice Elementary School. Mrs. Clayton is a true educator and believe me she goes above and beyond to assure that each child receives a necessary structure and basics which they will benefit and use throughout their years. Kudos to you Mrs. Clayton, we truly need more teachers like you in our schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2006

I am sad to see that there are no statistics here for the special education classes. I wonder if their data is lumped in with everyone else. Or, is it just ignored in the normal presentation of what Rice Elementary is all about. I have found the principal and office staff to be friendly, supportive, helpful, positive, and trustworthy. When the special ed teacher Miss Amy was at the school, she was beloved by her students and many parents as well. She developed a real community for the special needs children to have school and friendships. She reached out her influence even to the family giving the moms of these special children opportunity for a support group and the chance to make friends. Miss Amy will be missed. We look forward to seeing what the new teacher will offer our children and us parents in the special education department.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2005

Rice is a great school with very knowlegable teachers. Rice also has a very hard working and caring PTA. The principal has made many changes that have greatly improved this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2005

Academic wise, they are very good. But when it comes to harrassing and bullying, may I suggest that they start having a program about harrassing and bullying. I'm afraid if my other kid will be bullied. I hope they will do something about it. The teacher should report it to the principal's office.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2005

I attended Lilian J. Rice Elementary and now my son is enrolled there in Kindergarden. He also attended Pre-school at this same school. I am an active member in the PTA and look towards furthering my involvement within this school. Over the 2004 summer vacation, we received a personal at home visit from members of the school staff and PTA. They came on a personal level to greet my son and introduce themselves and welcomed him as he was to start Kindergarden. Not only did this excite and give a sense of belonging they even gave him a starter gift bag with items like a pencil engraved w/school name, a magnet with school logo and phone numbers, also a pen which also had school name for the parent. This truly makes a bond between the community and school. Overall, the staff, teachers and principal Mrs. Nakamura are exceptional people.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2004

Well, I have to begin by stating that this school definitely stands out from others I've seen by, the geniune compassion and sincerity you receive from the entire staff at Rice. The Principal Mrs. Nakamura, Staff as well as PTA members took it upon themselves to go out into the community prior to this school year beginning. They went to homes in the community and introduced themselves on a personal level to families and especially new students. They even brought a gift bag containing a pencil, pen, and a magnet all representing the school. More importantly they made an impact on those children; especially my own child. He felt special and could not wait for the year to begin. I can proudly say that this school is completely dedicated to the wellness of the community and it's children. I myself attended/graduated from this school and now proudly my son will too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2004

This school needs more student and staff communications. Needs improvement in providing tutoring for the students in Math and Reading. Communications between Principal and Students can improve. Rather than ignoring student harassement between students as just simple student issues... entire school staff should address these harassements as true emotional issues that can and will impare our children in later years. The 'Bully Program' will be a great start.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

832

Change from
2012 to 2013

+23

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

832

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+23

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
47%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
37%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
49%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
63%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
40%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
56%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students50%
Females52%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino49%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability49%
English learner35%
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduate44%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state50%

Math

All Students62%
Females57%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learner50%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate59%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students26%
Females28%
Males25%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Non-economically disadvantaged9%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability26%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only29%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state18%

Math

All Students55%
Females53%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students70%
Females74%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learner62%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate67%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state69%

Math

All Students82%
Females79%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino81%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner80%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate80%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females71%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged59%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner51%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate38%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state53%

Math

All Students76%
Females78%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate77%
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state77%

Science

All Students53%
Females55%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner42%
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate31%
Parent education - high school graduate40%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females58%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner49%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate64%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)62%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state50%

Math

All Students65%
Females56%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged66%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner56%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate73%
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 83%
White 7%
Black 4%
Asian 2%
Two or more races 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 83%N/AN/A
English language learners 52%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 22%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ernesto Villanueva
Fax number
  • (619) 420-6124

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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915 Fourth Avenue
Chula Vista, CA 91911
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 420-7071

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