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GreatSchools Rating

Portola Junior High School

Public | 6-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted July 29, 2014

It is hard to rate Portola because the quality varies greatly from one teacher to the next. In math, you might as well leave your child alone with his book and computer to figure all out by himself, but you might have a very positive experience with the English class. Parent perspective on school quality in WCCUSD is skewed by the many underperforming schools in the district. Portola ends up being a better choice than others, but that is not saying much. If you have a child and must live in the WCCUSD, this middle school is located in a safe neighborhood, and despite all, has a very good principal at this time. The band teacher is very active. It is probably the best thing about this school. They just changed the school's name to Korematsu Middle. A more meaningful change would have been to reelect all the school board members in WCCUSD, especially those who have lingered on for too long due to their political ambitions, not because they care to serve the children. Land deals and profits from expensive building projects govern WCCUSD. A good area to live in if you own a large construction company and want to get rich fast, not if you have school age children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2014

Portola Middle is disorganized and the leadership is poor and unable to inspire real improvement. While this school boasts itself as a diverse community, the reality is that students and staff are not treated equally. Teacher quality varies widely and teachers are not supervised properly. I question the safety of the students at Portola. The local police officer that works at Portola is often seen playing basketball or football with the kids instead of supervising the school. There appears to be a lack of supervision overall. The image of Portola as a great school is merely an image.


Posted August 22, 2013

We are so pleased with our up-and-coming middle school! We have a dynamic, engaged principal who is 100% present on campus and behind the scenes. Under his wonderful leadership, we see a welcoming, positive student culture where all students feel at home. My daughter had a great two years here, and is prepared for high school academically, and (perhaps more importantly), she is prepared emotionally. We love the diversity of Portola, the heterogenous classes, and the involved parent community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

We are happy at this school. This is our second year here, and we notice that LOTS of kids from our elementary school are enrolled this year, and all the kids at the school seem sweet and welcoming. We are looking forward to another great year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

With the new campus set to be opened during the 2015-16 school year, and the temporary campus getting love from parents, teachers, and students, there is a really positive vibe at Portola. Well-loved programs like band, math club, Writer Coach Connection, drama, and leadership are going strong. Plus new programs like chess club, after school language programs, and the dual-immersion Spanish-English program are taking off. Teachers will be getting additional support and training this year from a Scholar-In-Residence. Though the diversity of the campus creates challenges to educate and care for children with different backgrounds and needs, it is also a boon for my child who gets to experience many different cultures and perspectives. Despite the hard work ahead to insure a high quality education for every single child who attends, this is a school on the right track. My student is proud to attend her neighborhood middle school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2013

Portola is an amazing school its diverse they have swimming French spanish music drama and more I really do think you should send your child there.


Posted February 10, 2012

Does anyone know of any famous people that went to Portola Jr High? Thank you, Gary


Posted October 9, 2010

Portola has great kids who are eager to learn. We are on a temporary campus now due to earthquake problems . Portola needs a boost !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2010

I am so delighted in how the effects of Parent participation have changed the energy of this school year. My hopes are that the teachers will be able to focus on our children without the worries of the economy. Portola is now a safer school with the help of Portola Parents. Our Principal is very much supportive and supported.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2010

My son is much happier on the new campus. The old building was hard to navigate and it was somewhat difficult to supervise the students. So far, I like all his teachers and he has made a lot of new friends since starting here in 7th grade. The school staff and parents are very down-to-earth and seem to care about the school and the community. Moving to the temp. campus was a very good thing for this school and some of the new teachers are great. My biggest concern: large class sizes but that's true of most public schools now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2010

The only saving grace that this school has is the band teacher. My son excelled in her class and is now an aspiring jazz musician. Aside from that his 6th grade teacher was always way too busy for him and he slowly slipped between the cracks after having been a GATE student at Madera. She didn't seem to care how deeply this affected his self-esteem or his quality of work. The kids are very rough and use terrible language around the school yard without much supervision. My son had his lunch stolen and thrown around a few times, he had drinks thrown at him, ketchup packets sprayed on his clothes, was pushed around and threatened almost daily. He was too embarrassed to tell me these things were going on until the last 2 months. I regret letting him go to school there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2010

Portola is a much calmer and safer environment this year compared to the last 2 years when my older child went through. The kids really love it, and band, drama and leadership are wonderful opportunities for them to develop. There is much more parent involvement, and it shows. If parents can stay involved and help maintain positive contacts with faculty and administration, this school can continue to grow into a real asset, especially when the new building opens. The biggest negative is consistency in teaching: they have lost some good teachers. They still have some great ones, but some of them not so much... True everywhere I guess. Great after school program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2010

I am impressed by the quality of teaching. In world history, the teacher brings in guest speakers and they have started a debate team. In drafting, my kid was inspired to design/build his own projects at home. The science teacher took every student who won a first place ribbon for their science project to the Exploratorium. When I have gone to school concerts, I'm amazed by how well the students play. There is a math club that meets weekly and the students compete in match competitions. Parent community has been very active--buying supplies for the staff, recruiting parents to supervise during lunch, bringing in rec staff for special activities, and they do a monthly lunch for the entire staff. Kids will be moving out of the old building into portables down the hill which will be better. Bottom line: my kid is making lots of friends and is happy here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2009

It's a very poor school.The site supervisors are never around when there's a problem.They'll come after the fight.I would not recommened this school for anyone.It's not a good place to learn.It's very weak.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2009

I'm a mother of an 8th grader at Portola and while this is our first year at this school, I'm pleasantly surprised with how well it's going so far. I'm excited to see all the parent support and the PTSA is wonderful, very involved. My daughter is taking drama and just loves it already. I'm looking forward to the afterschool program and many other activities planned for the year. Parent support is key to sucess!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2008

As I sit here reading the reviews, it's more clear that people are not taking the problems at Portola very serious. It's easy to sit back and say well my child has fallen victim to this or that, but what about someone else's child. My daughter is very outgoing, friendly bubbling personality, very popular.. We live in EC and have lived in some areas not so good, but I've never had any problems with my children - until my daughter began at Portola in the 6th grade. The classrooms are so disruptive, teachers won't send the problem children out of the class, the principal or vice-principal won't do anything as far as kicking them out of the school. Don't sacrifice my childs education... It's unfair! Portola is the worst school and should be condemned. I can't wait for them to close it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2008

My daughter is a student here, in 7th grade. At first my husband and I were very apprehensive of the school because the site looks old and dirty; but I don't regret having my daughter there. She has very dedidated teachers that constantly challenger her and show that they care for her learning. I'm very happy with the school and the administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2008

This is a good school with a strong music program, some very fine teachers, and some engaging electives including art, drama, and drafting. It's not for everyone but for a motivated, focused student, it works.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2007

We just received our star testing back and were thrilled! I was told that the advanced teachers at Portola have seniority on which classes they want to teach. Request the AP classes. Our son was challenged the two years he attended Portola. He has learned what to expect amoungst your peers by attending this school. Wake up people, this is our community. Portola prepared my son for high school in a real life social enviornment. He feels well prepared and is so happy to be with his friends at El Cerrito High. He has learned how to take responsibility for his studies and apply himself. He scored profieicent in all areas tested. We are pleased to report this, when there is so much negativity surrounding circumstances at our own neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2007

Portola i believe is better looking and has better teachers this school i recommend to all those parents who want a great education for your children


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

738

Change from
2012 to 2013

+2

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

738

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+2

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

229 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
43%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

208 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

229 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
16%

2010

 
 
21%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

241 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
44%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
0%

2011

 
 
0%

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

268 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
37%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

246 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
40%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students78%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females54%
Males50%
African American38%
Asian67%
Filipino64%
Hispanic or Latino32%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner3%
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduate12%
Parent education - high school graduate49%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)40%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to state43%

Math

All Students39%
Females41%
Males38%
African American22%
Asian59%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disability55%
Students with no reported disability39%
English learner5%
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented88%
Parent education - not a high school graduate12%
Parent education - high school graduate31%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)27%
Parent education - college graduate60%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to state33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students25%
Females29%
Males21%
African American8%
Asian41%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino14%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)38%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability25%
English learner21%
Fluent-English proficient and English only26%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented59%
Parent education - not a high school graduate0%
Parent education - high school graduate19%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)28%
Parent education - college graduate24%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate53%
Parent education - declined to state24%

English Language Arts

All Students56%
Females69%
Males44%
African American35%
Asian62%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learner13%
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduate22%
Parent education - high school graduate37%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to state67%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students51%
Females59%
Males43%
African American32%
Asian60%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disability11%
Students with no reported disability57%
English learner6%
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduate13%
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)53%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to state54%

Science

All Students51%
Females57%
Males45%
African American26%
Asian61%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disability13%
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only55%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduate36%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)48%
Parent education - college graduate66%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to state44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Black 27%
Hispanic 27%
White 21%
Asian 18%
Two or more races 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 59%N/AN/A
English language learners 14%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 13%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Matthew Burnham
Fax number
  • (510) 559-8784

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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1021 Navellier Street
El Cerrito, CA 94530
Phone: (510) 524-0405

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