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GreatSchools Rating

Thomas Edison Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 718 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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20 reviews of this school


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Posted July 4, 2013

I have two children in the dual-immersion Spanish program at Edison. I couldn't ask for a better school! However, I have to point out that the traditional English side does not have the parental involvement that the dual side does, so it makes for a very lop-sided school. I am one parent that does try to encourage all other parents to help out where and when they can. In response to the kinders getting walked to their lines: when my kids started here, we could walk our kids to their lines. However, with tragedies such as Sandy Hook, the district and administration has had to respond with increased security for all schools. As for Edison, parents are allowed to walk their children to their lines for the first week of school. After that, sixth graders are tasked with waiting at the gate and walking the kinders up to their lines. There are also often parent volunteers who can do this as well. If you are concerned about there being a problem, then I suggest becoming the solution to that problem. The school's admin is very open to parental advice, help, volunteers, etc. They love to have parents spear-head projects to improve the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2012

To the parent who recently posted that she is unhappy with Edison. May I suggest that you speak with Mrs. Labrecque, the Principal about your concerns. She is very approachable and listens to parents' concerns and ideas, really! My son attended Edison last year, and he loved it! As a parent volunteer, I worked with Mrs. Labrecque and the Tech Program Coordinator, Ms. Kully. Both ladies are always so genuinely appreciative of parent involvement. Last year, older kids walked the younger ones to their respective lines, and parents can join them in the assembly area, but not inside the buildings. You have to sign in at the Office to get access to the classroom, and only if you have an appointment to see a faculty member or doing volunteer work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2012

This school is over crowded. My child just started here and I am not happy I choose this school. I think the school talks up their FLAG and Magnet program to try to get as many people as they can enrolled. The process of school drop off is a joke. They expect tiny kids to walk all the way to line up on there own? It can be pretty scary for a kindergardener and a very long walk. They do not encourage parents to help them to the school, yet they do not have people helping the kids to their lines? I will not be staying with this school for the long haul.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2011

great school my daugther study in This school goes in 3rd grade and speak , read and write in english and spanish thanks Thomas Edison School
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2010

4th graders did really bad! and 5th graders hardly did any good. I'm getting my kids out that school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2010

I have two kids in the Dual Immersion (Spanish) program. One in first grade and the other in 6th grade. At the beginning, seven years ago I had doubts since bilingual education was not popular or was thought to be only given to foreign-born students. What a change of attitude I have now! I can claim success in having two American-born kids that can handle both English and Spanish proficiently. And I mean speak, read and write. Teachers are very dedicated and it reflects on their leaders very well. I wish this program was available as a standard everywhere. The world is getting smaller and we will need more multilingual workers to help our country be even more competitive. Great work Dr. Kelly King!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2010

I am so pleased to have my child in the Dual Language Program at Edison. I have been impressed by the staff, teachers and administration and my child is very happy to go to school every day!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2010

Dr Kelly King is a welcome addition to the leadership of this school. All parents I've spoken with say the previous leadership was lacking. I am glad to say the Dr King interfaces with me personally anytime that I needed her assistance. She has taken the time to know both of my boys and in my opinion goes out of her way to make the school safe and progressing academically. Good job Edison!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2009

The teacher do explan good . The food is bad my child got sick of chick nuggets.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2007

Thomas Edison is improving and is going through many changes. A new Principle is arriving this year and many parents are looking forward to a new leader. The school may not be up to par in all areas, but this may be due to a number of political issues. However, my child has done very well in the Dual immersion program, where the parents are very active with each other, volunteer in the tutoring of the kids, support each other, and have open communication with teachers at meetings and socials. The teachers and coordinator of this program are truly dedicated to this program, which is expanding. For the Dual Immersion program I have chosen for my child, I am very happy with the
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2007

The school is identified as a Program Improvement School, because it hasn`t made an Adequate Yearly Progress for two consecutive years. I will be looking for alternative enrollment options for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2007

Thomas Edison is an excellent school whose curve is on the way up. The dual immersion program is Outstanding with dedicated teachers and program staff. The campus itself is top notch -- the library (just first rate), computer center, science room, et cetera. Parent support is strong, and the Family Center has lots of parent volunteers every day. This school is wonderful, and we are so glad our child is a student here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2007

I am shocked to see that people wrote about high parent involvement, nothing could be further from the truth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2006

Awesome school and teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2006

Just researching potential schools in the area. Have not visisted school yet. However, school appears new with a park and public library on campus.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 23, 2005

This school has a great place they call the Family Center. The Family Center is a place where parents can come and volunteer by doing a variety of things. Parent involvement is greatly encouraged at this school. The teachers have a caring attitude toward their students.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted March 24, 2005

This school is wonderful and has afterschool classes for the gifted and talent, music, assemblies for the parents to come every month where they give out awards to children, and have a very diverse mix of all equally great students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2005

Awesome campus with capable, innnovative teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2004

The school is not bad,but the kids are at the low level of intelligence.I am not happy with the kids surrounding my child
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2004

Edison offers a unique opportunity with its dual immersion Spanish/English program. This is the first program in Glendale Unified and enrollment is open to all GUSD students. Dedicated bilingual teachers provide standards-based instruction. The goals of the program are: * To develop fluency and literacy in two languages: English & Spanish * To ensure academic excellence that meets or exceeds District and State Standards * To cultivate understanding and appreciation of other cultures and to strengthen positive attitudes towards their peers, their families and community.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

851

Change from
2012 to 2013

+15

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

851

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+15

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
51%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
50%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females70%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino57%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learner57%
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)44%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to state58%

Math

All Students81%
Females83%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino77%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner78%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate82%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to state67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students48%
Females51%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipino73%
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate27%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)35%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state59%

Math

All Students68%
Females63%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipino91%
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner64%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females73%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipino73%
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged68%
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learner44%
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate61%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state82%

Math

All Students79%
Females70%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipino91%
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learner68%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate69%
Parent education - high school graduate76%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate84%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females74%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students73%
Females75%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disability55%
Students with no reported disability74%
English learner51%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate38%
Parent education - high school graduate73%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students72%
Females77%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students79%
Females83%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino74%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate46%
Parent education - high school graduate89%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state55%

Math

All Students76%
Females79%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate54%
Parent education - high school graduate86%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 52% 51%
White 33% 27%
Asian 11% 11%
Black 1% 7%
Two or more races 1% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 75%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Carmen Labrecque
Fax number
  • (818) 241-8028

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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435 South Pacific Avenue
Glendale, CA 91204
Phone: (818) 241-1807

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