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GreatSchools Rating

Harder Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 595 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted September 9, 2013

This school has improved a lot and will keep on improving. Parent should be more active, I know I'm always there - there PTA is so sad but there doing there best, they need more parents to be involved. The Teachers are great- and the rest of the staff . Everyone has one goal and that is to make this school a #10.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2013

I have a granddaughter in this school and I have to say there is much improvement needed. I have always been an involved parent and so is my husand and my mother. We have been yelled at, lied to, uninformed and when I wrote 2 letters to the principal and left a voice mail, I did not get ANY feed back. My granddaughter was out of school for 2 days and I was threatened with truancy.... not informed, threatened. Last year prior to the open of school, I couldnt even find out what day school started!! they called me the monday of the starting week. If we expect our children to be prepared, plan and communicate, then it must be shown by example.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2012

My son goes to this school currently. I know the staff is very involved and are working hard to improve the whole moral of the school. I have to disagree with the comment made about the principal. I am a total different race than he is and my son also experienced bullying. i have to say that the issue was addressed and measures were taken. I think sometimes we forget that the staff has state rules and regulations that leave their hands tied. There is no doubt that they are struggling with getting extra curricular activities started. It has to do with the parent involvement. If you are able get involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

The problem with this school is the principle he caters to his own kind. He is not professional and they need a new leader. I was a student at this school and was excited to send my child, it's his forst year and already he has experienced bullying. I have been up to this school several times and nothing has happened, now I see why it's a level 1 school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2011

Teachers and staff are good. I think the problem is the lack of parent involvement. We have gone to almost all parent / school meetings / assemblies and every time you see parents talking on their cell phones, talking over the teachers / speakers, and complaining for having to be there. One time my husband had to tell a parent that was talking very loudly to be quiet during a musical performance. Just don't go if you aren't going to participate. We did have an issue where my son was punched by a child and my son was sent home because his face was red from the punch and the other child was given a slip to take home, is that fair?. Also, my son was given a warning for sticking up to a bully that had pushed him and another child. There needs to be more positive things for the children that do not misbehave and harsher punishment for those that do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2011

Improvements are slow. Getting parents and teachers to get involved is like trying to move a brick wall. Teachers only want to teach, do what they have too, and go home for the day. Parents drop their children off and expect the teachers to do the rest without having to get involved until they pick them up at the end of the day. And those of us who do care, that do get involved, that do what they can for the student ; join the PTA and slowly try to chip away at that brick wall. Stop complaining, stop whining, stop crying. Everyone is to blame if a community can't pull together for the sake of their children. Everyone is to blame for not getting involved. Stop blaming the school, the teachers, the parents, because it doesn't matter whatsoever to the students unless everyone makes an effort. A school is useless without everyones involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2010

I agree with the previous posting. Harder seems soulless to me also. My daughter is enjoying 5th grade and has been at Harder since K with Ms. Lloyd. I'm ready to move on to middle school. I have an upcoming day off and want to check out the parent center which was just completed. One thing I must end with is my daughter is on the Honor Roll and she received her certificate. In the past, a Citizenship Certificate was also given to the students who earned it. She did, but was told only one certificate per student even though she earned both. I am not a happy parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 24, 2009

I am sorry to say that Harder feels empty this year. There was a sense of community in the last several years that seems gone now. The school lacks personality this year. The kids used to love to go to school and the staff, in general seemed happy. That is no longer the case. I was definitely happy as a parent. We need to find a way to bring the life back to Harder. Unfortunately the principals and many of the teachers who had that energy, enthusiasm and passion are gone. I hope that those of us who are still there can find it for the sake of the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2009

This year at Harder is going to be fun but we need more parent envolvment with the school site council. As the chairperson of the SSC, Im asking for any thoughts or ideas on how to improve Harders AYP. Harder is a great school but with more parents Involvement i know it will only get bettter
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2008

It is clear that change is a scary thing for some people. I am happy to see that change at Harder has been positive. Starting from the school facilities that have been painted and are lined with pictures of students and the school community. Physically the place is far more welcoming and more like a school than like the dingy institution that it looked like for years. There are a lot of student events for the kids as well as many many classes, workshops and groups for the parents to get involved in. I am one of the many parents who supports Harder and is proud to say that my students attend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2007

The school got some really bad press at the end of last year. Still the school continues to get better and better and in the opinion of myself its the best that it has even been (in all areas).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

It is sad that many of the involved parents at HArder do not have access to the internet or information about this website to enter their thoughts about the school. This school has experienced numerous changes. I can say that I have noticed numerous positive changes since a permanent principal has been assigned and a lot of new staff members who are young, energetic and excited to teach. Safety was a concern at the beginning of the year, but parent involvement and proaction on the part of the administration addressed the major issues making safety a concern.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

Take an opportunity to visit Harder and judge for yourself. The Harder community has had a lot of transition and as parent of 2 children who attend Harder, I can say that I have noticed a lot of improvment over the last several months. My child is in an intervention class to help with his academic performance and they now have counseling and other help for students who need someone to talk to. My boys love Harder and I am glad that I made the choice to keep them there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

The school has had lots of oppotunities for parents to get involved. But no one really ever shows up. Parents involvement is important to making a school better and making sure students acheive. I wish that parents would participate more at this school to help the teachers out, like I do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

I really wanted to send my daughter somewhere else because there was too much changing and questions going on there. I was unable to transfer her to another school at the beginning of the year. The school is still not perfect, but I am very happy that I didn't transfer her. She is in a combination class but her teacher seems to really keep her excited about learning and she is doing really well this year. The office staff and new principal are a lot more polite and helpful than last year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

My children is at Harder for the first time this year. They have not had any problems. The school has had some activities. I wish there were a few more but overall my children love it there and are doing very well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

Ms. Ford Morthel is the new principal at Harder. She taught both of my students when she was a teacher there. She was a great teacher and she has done a lot of great community things since she has been principal. My son who is now in middle school and many of his friends (at Chavez) have visited the school and comment on how much brighter the school is. It is welcoming and refreshing for me to know that someone who knows and has been apart of Harder is the principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2006

Safety is a huge concern at Harder Elementary school. New leadership would be a start. I don't believe the interest of the children is a priority here. How can children learn when exposed to constant fighting?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2005

Extremely disappointed in the administration. There's no prinicipal leadership. No discipline for those kids that don't care to learn, thus hampering the others learning experiance. There are some good teachers, however, the bad ones are allowed to be bad and provided a poor learning experiance to our kids. The only bright spot was the parnet involvement and the relationships that were made as a result.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

761

Change from
2012 to 2013

0

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

761

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

0

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
37%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
18%

2011

 
 
20%

2010

 
 
23%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
52%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
26%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
23%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
25%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
30%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
27%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students36%
Females41%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability36%
English learner34%
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate11%
Parent education - high school graduate37%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)44%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students53%
Females57%
Males49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learner54%
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate39%
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students33%
Females45%
Males18%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino28%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learner2%
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate27%
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state24%

Math

All Students55%
Females57%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learner23%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate57%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)77%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females32%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learner13%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate31%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state43%

Math

All Students62%
Females51%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged61%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner48%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Females54%
Males35%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability45%
English learner12%
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate41%
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state33%

Math

All Students61%
Females68%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged61%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learner52%
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate53%
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state67%

Science

All Students27%
Females24%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino30%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability27%
English learner4%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)25%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state11%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students52%
Females52%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females55%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 77%
Black 6%
Asian 5%
Two or more races 2%
White 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 82%N/AN/A
English language learners 53%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 8%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Hector Garcia
Fax number
  • (510) 733-0951

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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495 Wyeth Road
Hayward, CA 94544
Phone: (510) 723-3840

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