Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

La Tijera School

Charter | K-8

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

18 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 24, 2014

Very disapointed with the Administration at this school. Funding is their biggest concern and it shows. Very sad for us who live in the Ladera area and had big hopes for this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2014

La Tijera has some great teachers, but they are mostly concerned with funding over making sure the children are actually learning. Also, the Staff seems to be confused as to their roles and they gossip which I find extremely unprofessional. Above all, the student's actual learning should be first priority but it seems to fall second to school politics, funding, and petty gossip.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2013

This school is not very good. For one the principle was MIA most of the time. The counselor didn't know how to handle conflict between the students she just suspend without any resolution efforts. I believe the teachers are great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

i have a daughter in TK and so far its ok. her teacher is a wonderful person from my point of view so far .the principal is very friendly but i can't say the same about the rest of the staff. At times most of them walk around with mean faces and don't even know how to say Goodmorning. before i enter my daughter i did my research on this school and its rating is a 2 out of 10 which to me is not acceptable but this was the school i was force to put her n due to her birthday falling in Nov, i really wanted a charter school instead which is what i might do once she stars 1st grade. since i was told she will be doing the same Kindergarten grade again once she finishes TK. i want my daughter to be challenge and not have to learn the same material over again since preschool. she's only 4 and already knows how to read , spell ,write, add, subtract, shapes , colors, nouns , verbs, plurals, compound words and many other things as well as a 1st grade. so its not really any issue for her to do the work giving to her now. i will continue doing my research and find out how i can have her tested to be put in the right type of class even if its not this school. hope things get better .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2012

out of the 5 seventh grade teachers only 3 do there job. ms cueavs mr. wilson and mr. bowen are great the rest dont teach. The programs are surely great though. the principal is great and so is ms. miller


Posted May 19, 2011

La Tijera's Principle is ineffective and doesn't really care about the school's , the teachers nor the students. He is hardly ever their, recently there was a stabbing at the school, another student tried to set a classmate on fire, the school lack a discipline plan, it is a dumping ground for students who get kick out of other schools due to poor test scores or poor conduct.


Posted April 16, 2010

the parents dont even know whats going on at la tijera ! its the best school ever i love it with all my heart ! the teachers are funny and great . i moved from la t because of my mom but i misss it soo much i love la t<3
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 18, 2010

While there are some changes that need to be made at La Tijera School there some great things going on on the campus and there are some wonderful teachers at La T as well. This year the 2nd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade teachers a awesome. They have gone above and beyond the call of duty. And as I walk my child to class I often hear these teachers teaching with such passion and see the students excited about learning. While I do not attend every single meeting I am around on the yeard in the mornings and after school. I have overheard teahcers and other staff planning to buy New clothes and uniforms for students in need, I have someone planning to take girls to get their hair done... To me many of the teachers care about the whone child and not just there grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2009

Well i think this school is great my daughter was getting grades from about a+ a to a d+.But that school really helped my daughter improve from a d+ to a a+.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2009

My child attended this school for the first time in 2009. Not only was I disappointed by the unfinished (stalled) construction going on but the teacher was completely disorganized, unconcerned and unable to take control of the class. As a result my child did not fair well needless to say and the office staff was unprofessional, unattentive and rude. I stood in the office waiting for assistance while office workers walked past me and ignored me. Picking up and dropping off was a nightmare, there are few extra curricular programs, there is nothing for the kids to do at lunch/recess because there is no playground to speak of or things for the kids to play with. Shall we speak of academics? Well lets just say I feel my child completely missed out on a whole year of instruction at the hands of a teacher whose concern was not the student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2007

This school has the potential to be a great school but it is sorely lacking academically and aesthetically due to the lack of district support and more parental involvement. It is a nightmare trying to pick up or drop children off at the school due to congestion around school. The parents are rude and discourteous drivers. The students and are generally out of control. Because the school is located in a nice neighborhood, I expected a lot, but this school gets 2 thumbs down and needs a major overhaul.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2006

I'am a former student and I think that in order to have a good outcome you must apply yourself.I graduated with a 3.86 GPA
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 12, 2006

I am a concerened parent. I have two children who attend this school. My children have complained that the teachers dont care. I dont feel safe sending my children to school at La Tijera. Parents we need to gather together and work together to make positive changes at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2006

I have a daughter that attends this school and she came here in 7th grade fron Centinela school, I really dont care for LaTijera the teachers dont seem to care about teaching nor about the kids they'd rather not deal with the problems when they arise just put them out or suspend them. My child is not challenged enough. Where is the middle school atmosphere? There are'nt any lockers ,no gym, where do the kids change for P.E.? The construction is on hold and has been for while now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2005

This school is definitely in need of some attention. It is dangerous and the level of education is very low. The students are not challenged and the faculty is very uninvolved and unmotivating. The physical aspect of the school is depressing and nothing is offered to the students to encourage them to strive for excellence. Mediocrity seems to be the goal at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2004

I do not care for the school at all. The teachers just don't seem to like to teach. They seem lazy to me. Instead of fixing a problem they just put the student in another class to try to let another techer deal with it. How are these kids going to learn to deal with things later in life. I want to pull my child out of this school but financially can't. I just hate that my child might suffer if I don't.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2004

I question a few things about this school. I still wonder why the Library is not in use and has not been since the start of the year. Some of the teachers/staff willingly curse and use language that is unecessary. I also question why construction has not begun on the other side of the school so that the children are not all cramped together on the other side of the school. If the ground is uneven and the buildings are unsafe, why would you have a carnival in that location just this past weekend 4-8-04. The Principle needs to take more initiative to make this school a better place. Some of the staffers there are very unprofessional and are not setting a positive example for these children. Where's the TIGER spirit? Not there anymore! There are middle school children there as well. They need to know what to expect.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2004

I am in the 8th grade.This is an ok school. I used to go to Wilson Middle School in Glendale but I had to move here. It is a big change for me. This school has good teacher dedication but alot of people don't follow school rules. Also, we don't have too much extracurricular activities in our school. I actually havent seen 1 activity. My favorite teacher is Ms. Loupe because she really try to help us and motivates us to do better in our class.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

668

Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

668

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
10%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
5%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
15%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
15%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
4%

2011

 
 
22%

2010

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
11%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
14%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
41%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
10%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
24%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
30%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
21%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
4%

2012

 
 
16%

2011

 
 
23%

2010

 
 
5%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
19%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
16%

2011

 
 
15%

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
43%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students40%
Females53%
Males23%
African American41%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability41%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students31%
Females35%
Males25%
African American31%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)35%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students29%
Females44%
Males16%
African American31%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability29%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate18%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)19%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students57%
Females61%
Males53%
African American56%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate45%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students48%
Females42%
Males56%
African American47%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)53%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students55%
Females61%
Males50%
African American55%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)59%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students33%
Females35%
Males31%
African American37%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)26%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students33%
Females40%
Males23%
African American33%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)21%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students24%
Females30%
Males15%
African American27%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only24%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)21%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Females47%
Males36%
African American42%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability40%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only40%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate37%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduate44%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students31%
Females33%
Males29%
African American30%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged20%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability30%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only30%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate26%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)29%
Parent education - college graduate38%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students31%
Females38%
Males24%
African American31%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino30%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only35%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate31%
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)30%
Parent education - college graduate29%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students18%
Females19%
Males18%
African American15%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged5%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability18%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only20%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduate18%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)10%
Parent education - college graduate29%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students4%
Females3%
Males4%
African American0%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino8%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged5%
Not economically disadvantaged0%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability4%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only4%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate9%
Parent education - high school graduate0%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)0%
Parent education - college graduate0%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students27%
Females35%
Males19%
African American31%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability26%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduate22%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate33%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students20%
Females17%
Males21%
African American17%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disability7%
Students with no reported disability21%
English learner4%
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate19%
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)16%
Parent education - college graduate23%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students35%
Females40%
Males31%
African American36%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino34%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learner10%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate31%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)25%
Parent education - college graduate33%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Black 74%
Hispanic 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Asian 0%
Two or more races 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 89%N/AN/A
English language learners 7%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 7%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ugema Hosea-James
Fax number
  • (310) 680-5277

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1415 North La Tijera Boulevard
Inglewood, CA 90302
Phone: (310) 680-5260

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT