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Turtle Rock Elementary School

Public | K-6

 

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Living in Irvine

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $755,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,800.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 8 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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54 reviews of this school


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Posted June 22, 2010

I will be honest about what I observed as just a parent of TRock. Number 1, world view. This will be pushed from the youngest age, constantly over and over. Recycle, the ice caps are melting etc. OK, two, the kids are KIDS. I think somewhere between the test scores and prestige this fact is forgotten. Where is the FUN? It is also forgotten and replaced with the school's own agenda. Just talk with a student about it and see their response. Bottom line, great place to be a teacher, not so great a place to be a KID. Again this based on my limited observations while my child was attending.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2010

I, too, am a teacher at this school and find it to be a wonderfully diverse learning setting, unlike anywhere in OC. I teach primary and strive everyday to make my classroom a supportive, fun, thought-provoking place. I know that TR is a very academic place. Having taught in a very different district before Irvine, I think IUSD is a great district and TR is an example of that. We are fortunate to have district art, the Art Masters program, and a super music program. I was sad to read comments from unhappy parents. I truly work very hard to make TR a welcoming place, where thinking and learning are more valued than test scores. It seems like many of the issues in the prior comments had to do with the CA Dept of Ed's policies as much as the school's. I agree that there are too many students in K.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 26, 2010

I am a teacher at this school. I have experience at 5 different schools in Irvine. All are good with varying degrees, but Turtle Rock is outstanding. I can confidently say every teacher is extremely qualified and good at what they do. Regarding parents comments about curriculum and homework not being creative, much of that was taken out of our hands once the state adopted conformity with expectations and state standards. Most of us try to add creative elements as we can, but it is extremely difficult. With the budget cuts, be prepared for less opportunity for creativity. Teachers are going to be spread thin with 30 students in primary classrooms. Thank goodness for the wonderful parent support and volunteers. Although the future looks dismal, the TR community will find a way to do what is best for the students. This is a fabulous school for all
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 1, 2010

My kid was in the 1st grade. In 2008 we moved to Bellevue, WA. He continues to be in what is considered one of the best Elementary Schools here. The school here has all the gadgets (such as SmartBoard) in the class. Nevertheless, when compared in entirety Turtle Rock is a notch better. I personally do not think it is wrong in giving homework to kids at this age - the question is how much is too much. At TR my kid used to get homework in varied topics - it made it interesting. Some amount of repetitive work is good, after all 'practice makes perfect'. The teachers are very sincere in the both the schools. I guess it is the framework imposed by the School District that differentiates. Parent involvment is more in Bellevue esp in Fund raising - parents in TR should get invovled in this and other activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

TR is an outstanding school, a top school in Orange County. It's tops because of the awesome kids, parents, and teachers. Turtle Rock, ROCKS!


Posted March 29, 2009

I am very disappointed with this so called top school, the staff are obsessed with keeping the school scores high, it is our feeling that the children are treated as objects to this end. The class sizes are too large, way too much homework accompanies the children which the staff requires the parents to teach; I have a strong desire to assist in the teaching process of my children but not be the prime mover. The homework is repetitive and unchallenging for the children, I find no aspects of creativity encouraged, simply put, the children are being taught to pass tests. Never has my child returned home from school and described the day as fun or interesting. The attitude of the staff are that if the student doesn t represent a perfect pass level for there class or grade they should be held back, I and several other parents, feel that this is being done to raise the test average. I for one will not be allowing my children to be subjected to this wholly inadequate school at the next grade, I would recommend any future students parents to think twice before enrolling here, unless they want a child to be a poorly educated but fine test passer for the appallingly self centered staff and school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2009

Turtle Rock used to be the finest elementary school in Irvine with their old principal and staff. Unfortunately, the school has been going downhill ever since Sharon Adele retired, and was replaced with ChrisAnn Shane, who closed off the campus to parents and got rid of all the fundraisers (they needed to put ads on the front of the school directories to pay for printing). The APAAS program, especially 6th Grade, went downhill after the four original teachers retired. APAAS used to be based on a higher quality of work and thinking skills. Now it just increases the workload on students, and doesn't prepare them well for later years of school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2008

As a parent that has been in the school for a few years and with chidren going from Montessori to Turtle Rock, I believe that the academic curriculum, though unchallenging for Montessori children in lower grades, do get more challenging in upper grades. There are upper grade teachers, my child was in one, who gets the challenge because of the teacher in 5th grade - she was fantastic as was most of the 5th grade classes last year. Having volunteered in the classroom, I do know that children are taught how to solve the subject questions before homework assignment so if the child does not seem to know how to answer the questions, I would question if the child was paying attention in class? My child did and I normally do not help her with her homework, except for some of the GATE work which is more challenging which is what I expected of GATE. I have to agree that I was not as fortunate with the teacher in 4th grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2008

I had heard much about this school but my child has been there for 2 years now and I'm disappointed. They do not teach students, how to think. Only how to memorize certain facts or details, presumably those important for standardized test. My child attended a Montessori kindergarten and I found that the learning skills in that kindergarten to be far superior to 1st or 2nd grade in Turtle Rock
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2008

I find it sad that parents are saying that all the school cares about are standardized test. It is a wonderful school where the students are challenged and taught well. Compared with other schools, the curriculum pushes the kids to achieve more without putting stress on them. The staff are very helpful and will take the time to help the kids with all their needs. My daughter loves the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2008

Turtle Rock really isn't what we expected, most teachers are not good with kids they take much investigations about the personal life of kid's family, too much homeworks and don't explain enough, the principal just pretends to help but really just take care the prestigiuos school. Some teachers usually take preferences between students, and ethnic racial, they like perfect students but they are not perfect teachers, some others teachers are good and kind but the most not good with kids. too much discrimintarion too, we found since four years we really don't like this prestigious school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2007

Lower grades at TR are great, with some wonderful teachers. Upper grades are a huge disappointment. Overall, the scores seem to be much more a result of the demographics plus parental tutelage, not the classroom teaching. The upper grade teachers are very reluctant to differentiating instruction (the GATE activities are minimal).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2007

We have been at Turtle Rock for a year having attended several different schools over the years as we have moved about. Our experience at Turtle Rock has been very positive, we have found the teaching to be excellent and the activities challenging, innovative and interesting. The atmosphere is nurturing and positive. Our daughter has responded very well to the high expectations and encouragement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2007

Turtle Rock has gone downhill over the past few years with the new principal. The old sense of community is gone--parents are banished from the school grounds before and after school, except for occasional 'after-school socials' that few parents or kids bother to attend. Many long-time parents have simply given up and are just waiting for their kids to move on to middle school--or, they're leaving for other elementary schools. Although the lower grades are pretty good (too many kids in kindergarten, though), the upper grades leave a lot to be desired. Too much homework, way too much time spent preparing for the standardized tests by which the school is ranked and judged, and too little thinking. Previous comments about worksheets and filling in the blanks are correct. The goal is to have the kids score well, not think well--the two don't necessarily go hand in hand. Disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2007

I completely agree with the latest response (aforementioned). Turtle rock is too pre-occupied with scores and not enough student attention. There is way too much homework assignments and majority of the assignments have to be taught by parents at all times. The teachers expect parents to teach the students rather than just aiding the homeworks. Where has the quality of teaching gone? From my personal experience, the principal and teachers are not on the right page with the needs of the kids and the schooling experience. I will not send my child to turtle rock going forward...It's a sad institution for kids looking to enjoy the schooling experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2007

My child attended Turtle Rock, and I am one parent who is less than thrilled. Yes the kids score high, but sometimes that seems that's all they care about. There is very little time for art, music, or fun. (They say they have a great art program, but it's really art appreciation, and is about 8 times/year). There is WAY too much homework. And way too much of the work both at school and at home is repetitive and filling in blanks. There is very little emphasis on creativity. The kids never learn to write essays, just paragraphs answering simple questions. Maybe this is inevitable due to the large class sizes. My child was a good student (GATE) and did learn, but frankly, I often felt depressed by her school experience. Maybe all Irvine schools are this way... I'm trying Vista Verde with my younger child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2006

This is our second year at Turtle Rock and we are proud to be in such a great school where students, faculty, and parents work together to bring out the best in every student. I personally would like for the school to have supervised after school free time for the children so they can play. Great atmosphere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2006

Turtle rock is a great school. My child enjoys going to school. Even though we were new to this place, they made her feel welcome and the teacher is extremely helpful and affectionate and helped my daughter adjust well. The office is very busy all the time.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2006

Turtle rock elementary is a good school. The teachers are helpful and friendly. My daughter enjoys school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2006

Turtle Rock is a great school, with a strong all around academic curriculum, very dedicated teachers, and an extraordinary parent involvement. The school has a very active PTA that helps provide the school with wonderful music and art specialists. The upper grade music program is oustanding (especially strings).There is also an extensive after school enrichment program (ACE)that offers classes in art, sports, science, languages, chess,etc. It is a large elementary school, however, and children who are slow learners may feel ovelwhelmed and may have a bit of a hard time catching up with the pace of the rich curriculum.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

974

Change from
2012 to 2013

-6

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

974

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-6

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females94%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner84%
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state92%

Math

All Students92%
Females90%
Males95%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino81%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged72%
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learner91%
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females89%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learner76%
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state85%

Math

All Students94%
Females100%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner94%
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females88%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino79%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disability54%
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner76%
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state90%

Math

All Students90%
Females89%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disability46%
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner71%
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females87%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learner80%
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state91%

Math

All Students94%
Females91%
Males98%
African Americann/a
Asian99%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner93%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state95%

Science

All Students93%
Females88%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learner87%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students93%
Females92%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state93%

Math

All Students93%
Females92%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Asian 48%
White 28%
Hispanic 11%
Two or more races 11%
Black 2%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 13%N/AN/A
English language learners 21%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 1%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Karen Catabijan
Fax number
  • (949) 936-6259

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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5151 Amalfi Drive
Irvine, CA 92603
Website: Click here
Phone: (949) 936-6250

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