Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

John Malcom Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Laguna Niguel

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $456,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $2,190.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

18 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 4, 2014

love it! I think its an amazing school that all children should go to. Great teachers and staff too!


Posted April 7, 2014

My son is a fourth grader in Mrs. Hardos's class. He is a sweet but quarky kid who was prone to being picked on at his old school. Thankfully, we have experienced none of that at Malcom. He adores his teachers and school mates. We feel very fortunate to have moved into such a wonderful community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2013

Bullying is a big issue at this school. Kindergarten was extremely difficult for my son. He has never struggled to make friends and is very outgoing. His experience at Malcom made him so insecure and he lost so much self confidence, thinking he was not smart and a bad kid. I was in disbelief at the behaviors coming from some of the children and their parents for allowing, and at times, encouraging this behavior. When my son began to struggle in class as a result, the teacher never recognized the bullying, but he was punished for his struggles, by means of not getting recess for example. Day after day he wouldn't get snack or recess with the other students, creating an even tougher situation. Even worse, the teacher didn't approach me until she had already given up on him. This summer was tough as a parent because I want to protect him, but also don't want to teach my son that when things get tough, he can cut out. Today he started his 1st day in 1st grade at Malcom and we are sincerely hoping for a different result being that he is in a new classroom under new instruction and there is a new principal. If we start seeing things going down the same path, we're out of there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

The school is fine, however, the biggest problem at this school is bullying, without a doubt. The teachers and staff do nothing! My daughter went through a whole year and 1/2 of this until I finally threatened to go to the superintendent. What the heck Malcom, get with the real program and stand by your words. You claim to be zero tolerance for bullying...then do something about it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2013

Malcom has a wonderful PTA program and many fund raisers that directly benefit the students. Many of the teachers are excellent. Now to the part that matters most. This school has a huge problem with bullying and it is not addressed in a manner that makes a difference. It is "out of the hands" of the staff and principal. My child has attended from pre-K to 2nd grade and we're pulling him out for 3rd due to the bullying problem. He's a typical kid and makes friends easily, but the bullying is so global at Malcom that he's highly affected and begging us to change his school next year. I've heard from many other parents that it affects their children as well and we aren't the type to sacrifice our child's happiness and safety for a "blue ribbon" experience. There should be more done in the way of prevention.. more staff on duty at recess and lunch and bigger consequences for students and parents when bullying continues. More accountability overall. I mean look around, it's a serious and growing issue in the U.S. so nip it in the bud before you end up in the media Malcom!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2013

It is true that Malcom receives a good number of open enrollment students but I would contend that this only helps give it some diversity which it needs. There are a fair amount of pampered kids (and parents) from high income families but there are also plenty of parents coming in flip flops and shorts. Any elitism feel at the school is directly related to the area where the school is located - not the teachers or the principal. In fact, the principal, Dr. Morris, goes out of her way not to cater to squeaky wheel parents and this is well known on campus. She is regarded as fair and a good principal. The volunteer community is strong and Malcom has a fundraising arm, separate from the PTA, that raises funds for support teachers that spend time in each classroom working under the direction of the teacher. Malcom also has a thriving school garden program that works with the Ecology Center in San Juan. All in all, a good experience for my kids - not perfect but nothing is.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2013

This is a very mixed school with a high number of open enrollment students from outside the caption area in Laguna Niguel who are drawn by parents wanting to their children to go to a wealthy PTA funded and run school. The realilty is that many students are pulled from this school for various reasons including bullying and lack of dicipline in the classroom to go to other private, public and charter schools in the district. The inflow and outflow of students is hidden but should be noted and considered if you are looking to send your child here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2012

A great school! The teachers are very experienced and very concerned about the child's education. The math program is very advanced by offering the ST Math, weekly testing and advanced math classes. Dr. Morris is a very energetic principal, Miss Sally is wonderful and Rosie is amazing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2010

Looking over the reviews I had to chime in. My boy has had 3 teachers at Malcolm. All have been truly envoled in the process. The cirriculum is advanced, but well thought out and implemented. However, parents must get involved with homework and after school activities at Malcolm. For parents who complain about social issues and kindness, 'get involved' and send your kids to school 'prepared'. They will have more fun and look forward to school, learning and friendships. The rest will fall into place naturally. Kids wand to be proud of their accomplishments and share successes on a social level. Malcom also has a Great Principal and a Super Staff!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2009

Times are tough all over yet the collective community at John Malcom Elementary perseveres with purposeful direction, love and determination to make a difference in ourselves and in the world.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2009

After reading the reviews I have to weigh in my experience with Malcolm. My child was one of the first graduating classes. What you will find at Malcolm is education but what you won't find is actually what is most important- kindness. There is a sense of elitism in the parents and supported by the teachers and staff. It was an extremely painful time looking back and it might have been better to change schools as they tend to cater to only the upper level of society. Sorry Malcolm but it was true then and it appears to be true still.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2008

My children have attended Malcom for 5 years. It is an excellent school. The teachers are absolutely phenomenal! It is truly a 'community' feeling. There is a tremendous amount of
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2008

I took my kids to San clemente where the parents and children are grounded, not focused on the almighty dollar and know how to really play. The teachers parents and kids smile and are happy and recognize the uniqueness of all children. My kids were @ Malcolm for three of the most anxiety ridden years of our live. We had two excellent teachers and two judgmental rude ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2007

I am very pleased with the education my children are receiving from the teachers at Malcom. I am also very impressed with our Principal, Dr. Morris. At the January 2007 'Coffee with the Principal' she addressed the parent comment placed on this web site regarding bullying. She encouraged parental input and went over what she, the teachers and staff were doing to provide a safe and inviting environment for the students. Communicating your experiences and concerns with the principal is important; Dr. Morris is very approachable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 26, 2006

Malcom is a nice school, clean and academically good. The people are awful! There is a huge problem with bullying and the new Principal doesn't do much about it. The PTA is strong and has great leadership. Overall the academics is great but the social aspect is terrible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2006

Malcom is a wonderful school and I feel privileged that my children can attend this school. The teaching staff is excellent. Many programs are provided to the children including extra programs provided by the PTA (ie kindergarten music class). The PTA and overall parent involvement at this school is phenomenal and unlike most other schools I have had experience with.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2006

This was the best school I could ever dream of for my girls to go to. The teachers, the curriculum, the school activities, the field trips, the 'togethernes' of staff-parents-teachers-children, and most importantly the principal were unparallel to no other. My biggest fear of moving to another county has been the move to another school. And it has been justifiable. Good job Malcom on your great success!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2005

I love John S. Malcom elementary. The teachers are extremely nice and the parents are all easy to get along with. And my son loves it too!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

910

Change from
2012 to 2013

-13

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

910

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-13

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
64%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females88%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino83%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Females76%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disability31%
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Females65%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students79%
Females82%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students86%
Females91%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino78%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students86%
Females87%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Females93%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students76%
Females67%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students81%
Females79%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 78%
Hispanic 11%
Two or more races 7%
Asian 3%
Black 1%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 12%N/AN/A
English language learners 2%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

32261 Charles Avenue
Laguna Niguel, CA 92677
Website: Click here
Phone: (949) 248-0542

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

St. Anne School
Laguna Niguel, CA



Montessori Of Laguna Niguel
Laguna Niguel, CA



Del Obispo Elementary School
San Juan Capistrano, CA



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT