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GreatSchools Rating

New City School

Charter | K-8

 

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Living in Long Beach

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $215,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,330.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 20 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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76 reviews of this school


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Posted September 6, 2013

I love this school and my daughter does too. She has been going there since kinder and is now a 4th grader. I could not ask for a better more caring school than New City. The kids, the parents, the staff and all the teachers really make us all one family. We all look out for each other and are a great family. It really is a small school with BIG IDEAS!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2013

New City school used to be a great place. There are some great teachers like Armando but many of the great ones, like claudia, jose, and brenda have left. Since closing the pine campus New City school has really gone downhill. Safety is a big concern and having classrooms in a big open space creates an environment of chaos. The school lacks accountability and if your children have any concerns with safety no one will help you. All of my children attended this school at one point but none of them are there now. I would not recommend this school to anyone. The school claims to have a strong game plan for your kids but for the most part many teachers are just shooting from the hip. My child would start to read a text and suddenly be moved onto something else without any closure or culminating task. It is really sad. We really wanted to love this school because in theory it sounds great. If your child attends NCS I suggest you sit in and observe and ask yourself if that environment is truly helping your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2012

Both my children go to the Pine Ave. campus of New City PS and we have been very happy with this forward thinking school. The K-2 and 3-5 multi age classrooms create a wonderful sense of community and caring among the students. Both boys are excelling in math and LOVE the music, art and science program and we love the bilingual instruction. It is amazing to know that all students and teachers, and almost all parents know each other. The parents are fiercely supportive of the school and the students. The teachers are committed and teach to the whole child. How refreshing and inspiring. My boys are curious about the world around them, full of questions and LOVE to learn. They don't view school as a chore or a burden, they are excited to go back to school after breaks and love their teachers. It's ridiculous that this website scores New City at "1 out of 10." This scoring is another example of how off track our society is on what really matters in preparing our young children for the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2012

Learning is reflected in so much more than test scores. Do our kids love learning? Are they curious? Do they have confidence that they can find the answers to their inquiries? Are they part of a community that is working in cooperation with one another vs. competition? Are they given the tools of problem solving? The kids at New City Public Schools are learn all of these skills and more. Your child will greatly benefit from his or her experience at the New City Public Schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2012

We LOVE this school. We have a 5th grader, a 1st grader, and our youngest will start Kindergarten in the fall. This is a bilingual program- our 5th grader is fluent in Spanish and English, and our 1st grader already understands almost all the Spanish she hears, and can speak quite a bit. The teachers are fabulous, and the focus is on the student as an individual learner, not as a drone test-taker. I can't say enough good things about this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2012

My daughter is a 2nd grader at New City and she loves it. My husband and I chose the school for the bilingual program but the school offers so much more than just the Spanish program. My daughter is learning to be engaged in her community, learning about other cultures, to be a critical thinker and be allowed to apply her skills. Of course she is also learning to read, mathematics, language arts, etc. All subjects the traditional schools teach plus so much more. How many kids celebrate Earth Day by marching near their schools chanting: "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle", in both English and Spanish? The teachers and the curriculum at the school are fantastic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2012

This is a great school! You can tell by how many teachers send their kids here! I have even seen families leave this school only to come back.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 21, 2011

My 11 year old left New City to head off to a large non-bilingual middle school after 5 years there. Initially I was concerned that she was going to have a difficult transition but I can now say that New City prepared her well for her future. She is reading above grade level, doing honor's level math and is excelling in all areas. She is ahead of her peers as a writer, artist, musician and thinker. New City also gave her a moral compass that makes her compassionate toward her peers and a tireless fighter of injustices that she sees at school. This little non traditional school is not for everyone, but it was definitely for my daughter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2011

My son goes to new city and it seems like hes being taught second grade material. Is this what its coming to? I dislike this very much. No wonder the district wants to close it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2011

My daughter Mia has blossomed at New City School since kinder. She started as a shy 5 year old and now is an articulate and confident 7 year old who is an enthusiastic learner and curious about the world around her. Their learning program emphasizes critical thinking over memorization and offers music and art as well as an amazing bilingual immersion program. The best part of our experience is that Mia can't wait to get to school in the morning! Also, because the teachers and staff are nurturing and don't rely on punishment, she calls New City School her 2nd home. As a parent, I couldn't be happier and would highly recommend!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2011

We love New City School on Pine. It is small and friendly, everybody knows everybody and the staff care about your child as a whole. It has especially been a God send for my son who has autism but is in general ed. He has learned how to handle change, how to talk through any social dilemma and that learning can be fun.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2011

My son has attended New City School in Long Beach for 6 years, and I am very happy that we chose this school for him. With no report cards or grades, it is different than the schools I attended as a child, but we always know how he is doing in school. They have student-led conferences every few months where he gets to show us how he is doing and what he has been working on. There is less focus on memorization and more emphasis on understanding how math problems work. He has learned to love to read, and it is not a chore to get him to sit down with a book. He is always excited about his history lessons, and loves to talk to us about them. I appreciate their bi-lingual program, and it is neat that he is much better at following conversations in Spanish than I am. He is in a safe environment at the New City School, and I have great respect for their staff and leadership. I feel that they honestly care about him and his educational prgress.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2011

I have been sending one ore more kids off to New City for the past six years. When we first started, the whole enterprise for me was a leap of faith. When I would compare notes with moms of kids who attended other schools in Long Beach, I would usually end the conversation in a quiet panic, secretly plotting to purchase math facts flashcards and giving Saturday a.m. spelling tests. But the my child would do something mind-blowing, like solve what amounts to an algebra problem in Kindergarten and I would think, "fine, let's give it another chance." New City may not be for every family, every child. But the great unspoken truth about New City's approach, with multi-age classrooms and hyper-individual attention to progress, is that it tends to mitigate the natural variation in how quickly kids learn new concepts. Indeed -- and quite organically -- leaving no child behind.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2011

After sending 3 children through traditional Calif. schools that were a maze of testing and often critical, competitive, one-size-fits all programs, we sent our last child to New City School four years ago. The bilingual, constructivist curriculum is supported through strong and long student-teacher relationships. A culture rich in music and the arts and an active commitment to educating students about social justice and healthy lifestyles is evident across the disciplines. The high level of parent input and involvement and emphasis on students' collaborative learning process are key to the school's success. The recent addition of an urban farm has provided yet another opportunity to engage in real-time exploration and learning. This is a school that responds and grows with the needs and challenges of a rapidly changing world; a place where Spanish is sung, art is individually designed and molded, and young hands plant seeds that will one day noursh them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2011

We have attended NCS for 2yrs and are more than happy with our daughters progress. She is reading & writing so well. She loves her teachers & the staff. She has lots of unique opportunites at New City that she would not have at other schools in the district! I recommend New City to many parents each year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2011

My 5th grade son has attended New City Public School since kindergarten. We chose New City because of the emphasis on the whole child, problem solving, second language acquisition, and developing a love of reading, and school, in general. Our son has received a good education, feels that he is in a good, safe, place, has embraced problem solving both academically and interpersonally, and has acquired a love of reading. We are very happy with New City School and it has proven to be a great alternative for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2011

My son entered K last year and we chose to attend New City School rather than our highly-ranked (by test scores) neighborhood school. We have definitely made the right decision for our family. Things I love about New City - the bilingual program, its emphasis on the environment and social justice, the farm and the hands-on science lessons that take place there, field trips, small classes, a strong sense of community, no drilling and memorization for standardized tests, student-led conferences, daily music, and electives. It is a school staffed with committed teachers and administrators who passionately believe in the school's mission.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2011

This school is wonderful place for children to learn. My child has been in the program for six years and has thrived (I drive from an affluent neighborhood far way to have her attend). Her teachers are amazing at bringing out the best in children.I could list an endless array of the benefits of this sort of learning: an appreciation of history through the prism of social justice, a math program that teaches math understanding over result-driven algorithms, bilingualism as a means to navigating our multicultural world, why fairness matters, how being a morally autonomous person means more than just getting stars on the board or not getting in trouble ( it means caring about others and treating them as ends in themselves), how science fuels innovation, why music and art matter, how every person (even a child) has a voice and should be heard, how learning is something that we should all love to do (not just to get grades or high test scores) because learning is good and fun and makes us better citizens, etc. I recommend this school to everyone. It is a model for the right kind of learning. Ahead of its time perhaps. But what new way of thinking was ever accepted when it was proposed?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2011

NCS is currently in jeopardy of loosing their Charter. They are ranked LOWEST school in the LBUSD and have some of the lowest test scores. This school is failing and so are the students. My child has been in NCS since Kindergarten. Now in the 3rd grade and at barely a 2nd grade literacy I am taking her out. The none traditional form of Math is taught in Spanish. No hom from te work or tutoring to help out the students is offered, even after requests to Director. The open environment of the LB Blvd campus can be chaotic and distracting for some learners. I would not recommend this school academically. The philosophy is great as well as the dual immersion but that is all the school has to offer. That is not enough for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2011

Thank you for so nicely saying all the things I feel about this school! My child just started kinder there, and while the outside world seems to regard my choice as a naive mistake, I feel very lucky to be there. It is a privelege to work with such a caring staff that truly understands that I am entrusting them with caring for the most important person in my life!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

660

Change from
2012 to 2013

-4

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

660

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-4

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
13%

2010

 
 
28%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
17%

2010

 
 
42%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
13%

2011

 
 
16%

2010

 
 
12%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
20%

2010

 
 
24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
27%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
9%

2011

 
 
21%

2010

 
 
16%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
34%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
15%

2010

 
 
17%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
22%

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
7%

2011

 
 
6%

2010

 
 
32%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
23%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
10%

2011

 
 
17%

2010

 
 
34%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
5%

2010

 
 
0%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
18%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
0%

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
8%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
22%

2010

 
 
17%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students23%
Females30%
Males18%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino12%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learner3%
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate0%
Parent education - high school graduate16%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)20%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students48%
Females38%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learner26%
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)52%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students14%
Females15%
Males14%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino11%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged13%
Non-economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability15%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate0%
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)14%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students30%
Females36%
Males14%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability30%
English learner13%
Fluent-English proficient and English only46%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate9%
Parent education - high school graduate33%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)29%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students21%
Females32%
Males9%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged13%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability21%
English learner13%
Fluent-English proficient and English only30%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduate18%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)17%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students18%
Females18%
Males14%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino14%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged6%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability18%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only25%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduate9%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)17%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students39%
Females27%
Males43%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students15%
Females18%
Males13%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino8%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged10%
Non-economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability15%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only19%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students24%
Females9%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino13%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged15%
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students46%
Females50%
Males36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students23%
Females28%
Males18%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino18%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only35%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students16%
Femalesn/a
Males15%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino11%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability16%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only14%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students16%
Femalesn/a
Males15%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability16%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only14%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students16%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino16%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability17%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only19%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state27%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students11%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino11%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability11%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only13%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state18%

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students16%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino16%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability17%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only13%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state18%

Science

All Students26%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability28%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 72%
White 8%
Black 5%
Two or more races 4%
Asian 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 85%N/AN/A
English language learners 36%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Music teacher(s)
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Sabrina Bow
Fax number
  • (562) 436-7475

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
  • Library
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Dance
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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1637 Long Beach Boulevard
Long Beach, CA 90813
Website: Click here
Phone: (562) 599-6404

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