Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Longfellow Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Long Beach

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $365,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,380.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

37 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted March 28, 2014

Longfellow's test scores have gone down every year since they absorbed students from less well-off areas. Why? I personally believe it is because the teachers don't really teach. They don't have clear objectives that are based on standards with support from curriculum, don't model, or provide guided practice in new skills. They do their own thing, and the principal is very passive, so there is little accountability. Homework does not match what is taught in class, many teachers don't even use the appropriate curriculum materials. Students who have parents who are able to work with their children to take up the slack of poor teaching practices (or pay for tutors) do well, students who need extra help and good teaching to succeed don't fare as well. A very average educational experience as a whole. I based my review on my opinion of what I saw first-hand. I volunteer often in the school and classrooms of my child (2nd grade). One of my child's teachers was great, the other two not so much. The office staff is also invariably rude, sometimes embarrassingly so. My own child does well, but only because I ask my teacher friends for support. The volunteers are great, as is the PTA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2013

I have the interesting experience of having a wife that went there, three kids who went there, One in the GATE program, and now a grand child who goes there. It is significantly different from the 50's. In many ways the kindergarten is more difficult now than then and certainly harder than in the 80's. It is far easier than it was in Tennessee in the 50's though but that is California. All education is well below the national norm but if the child is in GATE it is well above the national norm so a lot can be said about individual effort. I don't know about the other grades except by the parents who mostly seem satisfied and my experience with GATE which is AWESOME.. The Uniforms are a nice touch. The parents seem involved and there is lots of support in the immediate community which is up scale from normal Long Beach. There are so many variables in a school it is difficult to evaluate one for academics, especially when the programs are district approved and have little variance. But the staff seems supportive and the kids seem disciplined so I guess those are big pluses. Anyhow, I think the school is excellent.


Posted April 23, 2013

Longfellow is a disgrace to the teaching community. I do agree with a earlier reviewer it all depends on the teacher but since the principal has changed and the teaching and accountability has gone down. If you are new and thinking of attending Longfellow Run and Hide. Choose another school. The PTA & Foundation are a close net group that controls the principal and the union and close to retiring teachers don't care about anything but the pay check. There are teachers who would send 90% of there class to summer school if they had summer school. Oh and by the way if you need a good tutor you can hire the children of the teachers who don't want to teach. I moved from the area to South OC just to get my kids into a good school and district. There are great elementary schools in LBUSD this just isn't one. They teach to the state test that is why there scores are so high and they cater to the people who scream the loudest and who are only using the school as a babysitter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2013

I have 2 kids in Longfellow that came from a Montessori school. My daughter got into the GATE program in 3rd grade and has had wonderful teachers throughout. My son came into the school in 2nd grade in November when my husband lost his job and we could no longer afford the Montessori. He had a rough transition and was bored at first but managed to get through to third grade where he was clustered into the GATE class. From there he blossomed and has been fine ever since. The teachers are caring and knowledgeable, the music program is good, parent participation is high, and the PTA is great. The first principal we had was wonderful, and the second was good. Overall it's a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2012

This is the most amazing school ever! I am a teacher myself and have subbed at many schools in LBUSD as well as LAUSD. Longfellow has amazing teachers, the PTA is extrememly active and the office staff, cafeteria staff, janitorial staff lovingly care for the school and the kids. I moved to this neighborhood so my kids could attend this school and i have never had any regrets.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2012

I am disgusted with Longfellow. My son was in Kindergarten and learned nothing. We had to hire teachers from another district to get him up to speed before entering 1st grade. The teaching staff is old and waiting to retire to collect there pensions. I was proactive and transferred both my children to a different district as the the LBUSD and staff at Longfellow were not interested in anything I had to say. I was a big supporter of the school but when they started to transfer the good teachers and leave the the teachers that don't care about anything but eating, hair brushing, blaming others and trying to get parents to hire there children to tutor. Not all things are bad there the Counselor is incredible. The other thing to remember when going there they teach to the test not overall education, so the first half of the year is all about the STAR test and how to score on it. I am so glad I am in another school all I can say is WOW what a difference in the quality of the teaching and expectations of the kids much higher. If you want to check out another district that really cares go south.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2012

Longfellow is a great school. My daughter was relocated there last year when Burroughs Elementary shut down. In the year that she's attended Longfellow, she has absolutely excelled. It has been great. Mr. Sarabia is one of many wonderful teachers at Longfellow. The library, science lab, computer lab, etc., are all top-notch. Much of the school's strength comes from involvement from parents, through PTA and the Longfellow Legacy Foundation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2011

i attended longfellow and it has the best teachers and staff, they are concentrated on making i child like learning


Posted November 28, 2010

Both of my children attended this school from K-5. Ms. Jones both of the kindergarten teacher was by far the best teacher there. She gave both my kids the BEST possible chance at succeeding as they went on further in school. Parent involvement was like no other school. I can't say enough good things about the staff & their teaching ability.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2010

My son has attended Longfellow since Kindergarten and is now in the 4th grade. He has been fortunate to have excellent teachers in every single school year. There is very high parent involvement with all of the activities. The teachers, parents and principal makes for a great combination to make Longfellow the wonderful school that it is for the students. "Can't hide that lion pride!"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

Longfellow is simply the best! Excellent teachers. Involved parents. Dedicated faculty. Wonderful, positive, engaging atmosphere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

All the teachers, staff, parents and PTA work so well together to give our kids a well rounded school experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

Longfellow has great teachers, is in a nice area and has a very strong, supportive PTA with caring and involved parents.


Posted May 6, 2010

My 2 boys go there and they have learned so much! They have the best teachers and everyone there loves each and every kid like thier own.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

Longfellow has the best teachers and best administration! Their school spirit is evident and they do a great job with the students...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2010

Great principal, great teachers, great PTA and great parents!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2010

We love Longfellow because it's an amazing school! The teachers, principle and parents are very involved in helping the children and the school. We feel very fortunate to be part of Longfellow Elementary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2010

Longfellow is a great school. We have wonderful teachers with lots of experience. Our PTA and Parents are very involved in making sure we help the school as much as possible. The principal really sets a great tone by being accessible and wanting to do the best for the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2010

I love Longfellow because it is a really great school. The principal is great, the teachers are amazing, the PTA and parents as a whole are VERY involved, they have a legacy foundation that is helping with all the budget cuts - we LOVE Longfellow
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2009

Longfellow has high API scores because they teach to test. Students get state guided lesson plans with plenty of worksheets year after year. The school has not fostered a love of learning in my child because the learning environment is rote and unimaginative. The school is inefficient in dealing with students with learning differences-Lf is fine if your kid is a high achiever already. It's a mix bag with teachers some are really mediocre-especially in the 3rd grade
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

876

Change from
2012 to 2013

-21

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

876

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-21

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

178 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

178 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

178 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

178 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

178 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

181 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

185 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

187 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

185 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females72%
Males55%
African American50%
Asian83%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino44%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disability27%
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to state61%

Math

All Students76%
Females76%
Males76%
African American67%
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disability73%
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate59%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to state76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females57%
Males46%
African American32%
Asian62%
Filipino67%
Hispanic or Latino37%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner6%
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate23%
Parent education - high school graduate32%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to state48%

Math

All Students71%
Females68%
Males74%
African American61%
Asian78%
Filipino93%
Hispanic or Latino57%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learner41%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate68%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to state56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students75%
Females81%
Males70%
African American65%
Asian81%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino73%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate39%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to state78%

Math

All Students80%
Females85%
Males77%
African American74%
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino77%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged66%
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner57%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate82%
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to state83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females80%
Males75%
African American70%
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)66%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females79%
Males77%
African American68%
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)70%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students78%
Females77%
Males80%
African American67%
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate45%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 33%
White 22%
Black 17%
Asian 13%
Two or more races 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 42%N/AN/A
English language learners 10%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3800 Olive Avenue
Long Beach, CA 90807
Phone: (562) 595-0308

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Oakwood Academy
Long Beach, CA



Grace Christian School
Long Beach, CA





ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT