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GreatSchools Rating

Bullis Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 340 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 11 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

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87 reviews of this school


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Posted March 30, 2014

We love this school, and our son does too. After a few years of trying, we finally "won the lottery" and were able transfer from Gardner Bullis to BCS this year. We are very pleased with what we see and how our son has responded. The co-curriculars, extra curriculars (especially Mandarin) at BCS are real differentiators, as are the sessions our son gets to take at the BCI campus with the Fab Lab and Maker Space. Our son loves these programs. The only downside we have seen so far is the logistical challenges we sometimes face with there being a split campus between the BCS site at Egan and BCI at Blach. The District (LASD) ought to be ashamed of itself for not doing the right things by the kids and finding space in one location (like at Convington site instead in place of the district offices). That being said, we are affected only occasionally and in minor ways, thanks to the efforts of the teachers and administration to keep things well oiled and humming along. It is well known that people move to Los Altos for the schools. After experiencing Loyola (K), Gardner Bullis(1,2,3) and now BCS (4), I am convinced that BCS is the best within this exceptional district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2014

I was present at the school's inception and taught there for five years. I won't go into how outstanding the school is and what unique and wonderful programs it has. I do believe they are amazing, but I let the parents be the judge of that. I am posting this in response to the "staff member" who commented on the Principal being "soulless." I find it interesting that this same person who is obviously disgruntled had to admit that the school has amazing programs such as Mandarin. I must point out that programs like these are put and kept in place by this same Principal. Yes, the school gets lots of funding from families and the staff members are there making magic every day, but SHE is the force behind the school. SHE implants the amazing programs, she fights for her staff and she is personally connected to each and every staff member and student. If you have anything good to say about the school, it is likely because of her.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 26, 2013

This school is good in some regards (i.e. having students take Mandarin in Kindergarten) but horrible in others. To begin, the principal is a bully. She puts on a good front for the donors and parents but really has no heart. I am not sure if the school climate has made her become this way or she was souless to begin with, maybe it's a combination of both. The parents are also tough to handle. I think when you have as much money and power as them, you get used to getting your way, no matter the cost or who you run over. So many of them depend on hired help like nannies, gardners, maids, etc. that they see the school staff as just another service person they get to control. Also, many of them are old and since they do have so much money to spend on their 1 child, the child in turn becomes a spoiled brat. I am so glad I quit and will never work at another charter school again. Everyone- please support your local school and use your $ to help them instead of funding charters!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 16, 2013

I am a current 8th grader at Egan and I only have one thing to say: as an elementary school this school is amazing. However, as a middle school, your best bet is Egan. At BCS, The middle school teachers are biased, have their favorites, and most are clearly not up to the task of teaching their particular subject. Many people may attest to the fact that BCS is a no-bullying school, but I am here to tell you that there is bullying. Most of the kids are very spoilt and the higher end kids love to bully the lower class. If you take a look at the demographics at the school, you will see a 90% white ethnicity, 0.02% black ethnicity, and a 19% asian ethnicity. However, BCS does NOT have any drug problems, which, is definitely something worthy for a school to be able to boast about. One last thing is all the hostility shown towards BCS student. The main reason I moved to Egan was to expand my social circle and also so that kids don't judge me over having gone to BCS. Personally, I think the legal battles between LASD and BCS are taking a toll on the kids that have gone to that school. BCS is definitely a first-rate elementary school for your kids, but not for middle school. Thank you


Posted June 23, 2013

My child had an amazing first year in BCS. it offers tons of opportunity to grow and it is true that the focus is on the child; she felt no pressure but nurtured to do her best. My daughter has finally blossomed here and she gained the confidence she was struggling to develop and other school failed to help her with that. What make BCS special is first of all the passion of its principal. She always invites parents to contribute the way they can and wish because our efforts make our life and the school's life special. Rather than fighting against this school I invite families to do their best for the school of their children and honor the achievements resulting from hard work in their school as in other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2013

I am a 7th grader at BCS. I have been at this school for a while, and until sixth grade, I absolutely loved it. Good teachers, good curriculum, nice kids. However, this year, this was not the case. There was only one teacher that I can really say I liked, the rest were biased towards the other class and liked to yell at us and keep us late, because there are no bells. I learned absolutely nothing in math this year- the math curriculum is horrible. There IS bullying at this school, and there IS middle school drama. There are people that cut themselves, there are the 'popular' people,etc. They have a lot of good enrichment ideas, but none are performed well. For example, in mentoring, I learned absolutely nothing and all we really did was talk about random things. Most of the kids at Bullis are from very rich families, and you don't get a lot of diversity. Overall, the curriculum, the teachers, and everything else is dissatisfying. Also, there is a ridiculous thing going on between LASD and Bullis about relocation that would be inconvenient for EVERYONE. However, kids here are encouraged to take leadership opportunities and there are a lot of oral presentations etc.


Posted May 16, 2013

Bullis indeed has great programs. However, its teaching staff is treated poorly by a power-hungry principal, and it's under-paid, especially relative to other local high-performing districts. Sending your child to Bullis is a bit like buying an iPhone -- very enjoyable until you realize the labor conditions under which it was produced. The teachers aren't unionized, and that does free them up in some regards, but it's not worth it for the teachers to not have a voice. I support public and unionized education after my experience at Bullis.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 13, 2013

I am a 7th grade student here at BCS, in Ms. Stone's class. This is a wonderful school with amazing opportunities. The only reason why I may go to Egan next year for 8th grade, is because of the school's location conflict. My sister, a graduate of BCS is currently a freshman at LAHS, and if I get sent to Blach, it will be hard to drop off botht the kids. Nonetheless, this is a wonderful school without bullying, and I would definitely encourage anyone to send their kids here! **4.5 Stars**


Posted February 25, 2013

I think it's important to share a BALANCED view of Bullis so here goes. Before transferring from a nearby private school, I spoke to parents in LASD and Bullis. I also 'observed' the kids of these families as another (subjective) measure. Net, net what I discovered is that both have great kids and offered amazing programs, but LASD suffers from a (lack of) marketing problem. We ultimately chose BCS because we felt it would be an easier transition for our kids, who were used to a more refined school environment. While not necessarily a bad thing, LASD has kids with some pretty severe learning differences who, according to some parents, can make classroom dynamics tough for the untrained teacher. At Bullis, parental involvement is over the top GREAT. Again, heard mixed things about LASD. Lastly, I think language exposure is important and our kids have enjoyed the 'mandarin light' curriculum. The one MAJOR downside of BCS is the squabble over our location. While I don't get all of the nuances, I hope we find our own permanent site because the negativeness definitely permeates down to the kids. In summary, we are pleased with BCS and encourage parents to do their own research.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2013

BCS has been a transformative experience for my daughter. After 5 years in the LASD system and only one great teacher-- she was, of course, laid off at the end of the school year to everyone's sorrow-- I gave my daughter the choice to move for the last few years or stay with the friends she had made. She chose to move after 2 visits to the school. The BCS integrated child/ integrated personal learning style is exactly what both of my very different children need. During the holiday break, my Tween Queen volunarily researched more about a project that ended at the end of the school term just because she wanted to learn more, entertained herself by pushing forward in math skills (Thank God for Sol Kahn & KahnAcademy!) and rehearsed a musical piece for the spring musical. Yes, the local politics are ugly but both kids' joy of learning and engagement are worth it. As a working mother, I love that the extras at school are on campus and vetted; in former years it was the pay through the nose of various tutoring and enrichment activities because LASD has forgotten what kids need. *All* schools should lengthen the day & enlighten the child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2012

While we are a new family to the school, we have been quite impressed with the inclusive community, level of communication to parents and school spirit. The school is well run, our child's teachers are engaging, and my child loves school. We have felt impressed by the Focused Learning Goals. Each child is assessed by teachers and parents on stregnths/weaknesses and goals are identified in not only educational subject areas but also in social and emotional development. We also have experience in the local neighborhood school and have not been impressed with the lack of differentiation for gifted kids. While I believe there is no "perfect school" for everyone, having the ability to choose a different option for my child has been invaluable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2012

I was a student at Bullis Charter School until I graduated in the first 8th grade class this past June. I had been at Bullis since 1st great and have never been disappointed by what they had to offer me. I think that the Bullis Charter School experience is something you need to have to understand it fully. I love how creative I get to be there and I am sad that I've moved on (LAHS). The staff, students, and administration are all there to help you and everyone is insanely nice.


Posted August 17, 2012

I've experienced both an LASD school and Bullis Charter and hands down Bullis Charter is a better school which address the whole child and does not spend the entire year teaching to the test.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2012

We transferred last year from a local LASD school. We thought with all the hype of have wonderful BCS would be that we would jump on the band wagon. We do like the longer hours for our child, but the exceptional program we have received for $5000 and extra pressure hasn't been what we though. We will be going back this year for one more try as our child has made some friends, but if the pressure doesn't decrease then we won't be back the following year. Some of the teachers are wonderful, while others are not. We had better teachers at Springer School across town. The community feel was ever present there and our youngest will be enrolled there as I don't think BCS is a good fit for him. We will give it one more year and see.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 25, 2012

Bullis offers electives during and after school which are fun and interesting. After a few years though, many children including our own, lost interest due to the stress there. Instead of focusing on collaboration and ingenuity, the standard graded worksheet approach is used. There is a tremendous amount of competitive pressure to be the best, which unfortunately at this age turns many children off. Not having time to deeply focus on subject areas, too many transitions, the (we are the best ) attitude from parents and administration, and lack of support for anyone who is different concerned us enough to leave after several years at the school. The teachers are great for the most part; we had several good and one horrible, but overall there is a disconnect between what children need to thrive and what the school offers. The school really needs a social/emotional element like Project Cornerstone at the local schools, Self Science at Keyes, the Kindness approach at Living Wisdom, etc. We decided to leave Bullis and are all happy and impressed with the change.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2012

This School is absolutely amazing with its hands-on learning, passionate teachers, and wonderful enrichment program. I am absolutely delighted that my child could go to this school as he has developed a love for learning in a way I never thought he could.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2012

BCS is an excellent K-8 school. I have never seen teachers and staff that are more passionate and willing to help your child progress. It is an alternative to the standard LASD public school system, which is good as well. The difference is in the curriculum. Mandarin enrichment and Spanish at later grade levels, drama, arts, public speaking and more. At the end of the day you want to give your child the best education possible and for us it was BCS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2012

BCS has been perfect for my child and my family for the last six years. While I am sad that anyone might leave after a less-than-perfect experience, I respect the choices *parents* make for their children. The *writer* who makes accusations, however, and who tries to scare people off rather than directing people to bullischarterschool.com that has the FACTS about our school, I do not think should be able to "review" this fantastic school they have not attended. If you are considering BCS, I invite you instead to look at the enrichment education (full time, credentialed, staff giving every student art, PE, dance, drama,music, and foreign language) and dedicated staff inspiring individual students on a daily basis. Yes, LASD has not offered BCS reasonably equivalent facilities as required by law and now must make a speedy decision and follow through on how to rectify their mistakes. We are all local families and community supporters who want what we each think is the best environment for our own kids. No controversy there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2012

We are a new family to the school. Teachers, staff, and principal have been super nice. Facilities are a bit cramped, but I think they are going to add some space next year. We love the mandarin program and music opportunities. Great public school choice for Los Altos.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2012

We chose this school because we wanted our kids to have an education that developed the whole child, with music, drama, art, P.E., and foreign language. What we got was so much more. Individual learning plans. Project-based learning. No drills for standardized tests. Our kids love going to school because it is so much FUN. Their teachers are enthused about their jobs. The teachers are all working on their own professional development with things like National Board Certification and teaching co-curriculars (during the school day) like Edible Math, Lego Robotics, Origami, Watercolor, Dance, All About Sharks -- an amazing assortment of classes 2-3 times/week that keep everyone jazzed about learning. The teachers are smart, engaging, and the hardest working group I've ever seen. The parents are a terrific group of diverse folks, both ethnically and socio-economically diverse, that work in a wide range of industries but all share a passion for education that works. I look around me at school functions, drop-off and pick-up and see happy, well-adjusted kids and families who feel grateful for having had a choice in their child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

989

Change from
2012 to 2013

-5

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

989

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-5

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
95%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

18 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

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Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

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History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Females92%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females92%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Females93%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students98%
Females96%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students98%
Females98%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability99%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only99%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students100%
Females100%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Females100%
Males95%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students98%
Females100%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged99%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability99%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only99%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students98%
Females97%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Females100%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students96%
Females96%
Males95%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability98%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Females100%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students97%
Females95%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students100%
Femalesn/a
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Femalesn/a
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students96%
Femalesn/a
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students100%
Femalesn/a
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 53% 27%
Asian 29% 11%
Two or more races 13% 3%
Hispanic 4% 51%
Black 1% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Wanny Hersey
Fax number
  • (650) 947-4989

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

102 West Portola Avenue
Los Altos, CA 94022
Website: Click here
Phone: (650) 947-4939

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