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GreatSchools Rating

Ocean Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 431 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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85 reviews of this school


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Posted December 22, 2010

As parent-founded schools grow, I think it is common for parents to feel excluded from decision making-- it is hard to be as included as a school grows from 160 to almost 400. Employees' right to confidentiality conflicts with parents desire to know why one teacher is retained and another let go. That said, magical things happen at Ocean Charter. The environment is overwhelmingly supportive and safe. The teachers are creative. The curriculum is beautiful. The lower grades are especially strong. Some of the parents are exceedingly hard to please and are used to private school "service". This is a public school where the learning challenges are way more diverse than at an exclusive private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2010

Ocean Charter School has a great community, with wonderful teachers dedicated to providing the children with a creative 'Whole Child' curriculum. Look at the children's faces showing their enthusiasm for discovery, exploration and bio-dynamic gardening. We enjoy the hands on learning approach and understand the depth of the academics interwoven into the curriculum with a strong arts foundation. What a dynamic school and faculty who has the intention of creating the opportunity for each child to gain the capacity to 'think' for themselves. Just imagine if we could all do mathematics while skipping rope and singing- what a happy way to do accounting. What a magical school grounded in the principals of creative education and a strong healthy community of families together building this dynamic Charter School. Many families have helped set up the school, dig the gardens and raise this Charter school over the past years. It has now over 370 children enrolled from K-8th Grade. The Whole Child Curriculum teaches children in a safe, protective and naturally beautiful environment using methods that fill each child with delight, wonder and enthusiasm. To facilitate this ease of learning, classroom teachers stay with the children for three-year cycles. "Ocean Charter School's Whole Child Curriculum, informed by the Waldorf educational approach and built on a foundation of creativity and self-confidence, grows with the child to balance imagination, critical thinking and academic excellence. This foundation, combined with a focus on ecological and social responsibility, nurtures a sense of delight and wonder about the world, as well as respect for nature and humanity."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2010

Ocean Charter had great potential. When it first opened it relied heavily on parent involvement, not just for their own children's experience but for the development of the school. Teachers and parents working together to actually create a school--just what the charter movement is about. The current board chair and administrators as leaders have hidden everything with their goal of running a school with no interference from anyone. With them at the helm, parents have no voice but are only asked for money and sweat. The biggest problem is that they have no professional capacity to run a school and the result is that every year, half the teachers leave. And forget the middle school--no resources devoted to it and new teachers constantly coming in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2010

I would really like to hear someone speak to the fact that the parents of so many returning 6th graders have chosen to leave Ocean Charter this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2010

From initial observations, Ocean Charter School is a wonderful place for learning, most especially in the younger grades. But upon a closer review of the school organization, the administration, faculty and community meetings, and the relationships among the students, one begins to observe some major problems within this charter school organization. To begin with, the administrtative team of Mrs. Stephanie and Mrs. Kristy (neither of whom possess proper Admin. Credentials), have a gross reputation of incompetence among the faculty . These two self-empowered individuals blatantly disguise their ineptitude with smiles and other deceitful pleasantries. One egregious example is the fact that new teachers are not provided with a school handbook with accountable policies about the curriculum and for professional evaluations. As a result, the Administration operates under a very non-transparent screen that allows them to make decisions with no managerial oversight or accountability. Look closely & you'll be sadly surprised.


Posted April 20, 2010

The sense of community--children, teachers, and parents working together to support a place where curriculum is shaped by the teachers themselves according to the developmental needs of the children at each particular age.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

i have 3 children at OCS and have been involved since the first year. i feel really good about the lower grades and moderately worried about the 4th-8th grade curriculum. i worry about my children being prepared for highschool, yet not worried enough to pull them out. Parents pull a lot of the weight, politics are a bit much, some cliques exist, admin seems continually overwhelmed and slow to respond to issues. much of these issues are due to growing pains and budget issues. i don't believe that any school will avoid all problems all the time, so I stay at OCS and stay involved. my children are greatly benefiting from the broad range of subjects (handworks, games, music, theatre, singing, math, science, japanese, spanish, etc...) the community of loving, hard-working teachers, parents and engaged curious children keep me living in this city!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2010

It's unfortunate the poster below had such a negative experience at OCS and that their child also was effected. I would like to say, however, that as one parent in a dual parent working household with a child at OCS, this has not been my experience. We as a family are friends with many dual working parents and with single parents at this school and this poster's experience has not been reflective of what we or our child has experienced. There are very likely some unfriendly people at this school or in a particular class, but find a school that doesn't have an element of that. I'm sorry this family felt they had to leave.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2010

I think that there is a large difference between the lower grades and the upper ones at Ocean. While I really like the 'whole child' approach in the younger grades, the upper grades suffer from the lack of rigor in the academics. The upper grades are well behind other schools in mathematics and writing, and they rarely do such basic things as book reports. Considering this continues through the 8th grade, the students are seriously disadvantaged when they move on to the high school level. While I will agree that parent involvement is high, the parent body (and students as well) are very cliquish. In addition, while they mean well, the parents are completely disorganized. Events such as field trips or even day trips are always thrown haphazardly together at the last minute, or cancelled due to lack of planning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2010

OCS cannot use ethnicity to weigh lottery results because it is unlawful in the state of California to do so, unless it was grandfathered in like it was for some of the earliest charter schools. At this time, magnet schools remain exempt from these mandates. The diversity committee has been working very hard with it's outreach efforts to bring greater diversity to it's lottery pool and could use all the help it can get. It also has a great many other things it does to help celebrate diversity at OCS. Yes, the school needs improvement in this realm, but is working to achieve it. This is a great school otherwise and my child of color is learning a great deal and loves going to school everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2010

It's too bad they don't use a lottery and factor in race (like the magnet schools) to get a hetergeneous community w/in the classroom. You can have diversity committees all you want, but if children are not mixing with different races on a daily basis inside the classroom walls, then the school is not walking the talk.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2010

I am so sorry to hear that last review. It is true that OCS doesn't have the number of African American children and Hispanic children that is reflective of Los Angeles, but my daughter's class has children whose parents are from Asia, England, Ireland, Poland...so there is diversity in a sense. Plus, we have the most active diversity committee ever. They are reaching out to the community. All who get into OCS get in through a lottery system so it is not like the school itself controls who gets in. I have found the school truly wonderful. I love that the school stresses the importance of play and homework is not assigned until 2nd or 3rd grade, yet test scores are among the highest of all comparative schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2009

This is such an awesome community. Our kids are loved and nurtured by their teachers and a curriculum that is truly adapted to their development stages. Learning happens in such a natural way it really feels like blossoming !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2009

It is a great comunity where the kids are the most important part.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2009

they truly care about growing well rounded kid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

Inspiring teachers, creative curriculum, and an amazing community!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

The curriculum addresses the whole child, promoting the development of healthy, responsible, and creative human beings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2009

This school provides a very nurturing society for where our children can grow, blossom, and meet their potential.


Posted September 18, 2009

It's the best Waldorf inspired curriculum in the US with amazing teachers. My children are learning so much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

Ocean Charter School has a wonderfully supportive community of parents, teachers, and staff who enable a holistic growth experience for our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

780

Change from
2012 to 2013

-95

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

780

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-95

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
67%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
29%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
42%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students21%
Females26%
Males17%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino0%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate11%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students43%
Females41%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate52%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students32%
Females29%
Males36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)33%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate32%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students59%
Females50%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females88%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students77%
Females85%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females68%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students39%
Females47%
Males29%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate44%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students61%
Females74%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females77%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females73%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females69%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students52%
Females46%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students21%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students57%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students35%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 53%
Hispanic 21%
Two or more races 18%
Asian 5%
Black 4%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 19%N/AN/A
English language learners 4%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 144 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
69%
agree
 
District average
72%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
69%
 

District average

 
70%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
89%
agree
 
District average
70%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
89%
 

District average

 
78%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
74%
agree
 
District average
68%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
74%
 

District average

 
66%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents14433%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Stephanie Edwards
Fax number
  • (310) 827-2012

Resources

School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Library
School leaders can update this information here.

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12606 Culver Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 827-5511

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