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GreatSchools Rating

Ocean Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 355 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

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83 reviews of this school


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Posted January 16, 2014

This has been a perfect school for our child. We love the small intimate school. Currently the school has two campuses, but the board and administration is working on building a new school This school is not for everyone, and it has to be the right fit for your family and child. It is more grounded. No-technology, especially K through 6th grades. This includes limited screens, ie television, computers, cell phones, etc. Although, LAUSD choose this school as one of the test schools for the ipdad program, the school is limiting it's use in teaching programs. We love that they teach Japanese, and music, art. The students create their own text books, which by the end of the year are beautiful memory books. We love that the school grounds, planting, and outdoor activity are a big part of the program. We love the teachers, who are certified in Waldorf, project and creativity based education. We love that eye contact is part of the program. The administration are dedicated and energized to create the best school. The school has many dedicated parent volunteers. The Winter Faire and Spring Faire are amazing events.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2014

I have 2 kids at OCS and we all love it. Despite what many people think OCS is very structured. In order to be such a free, creative place to learn it needs structure and OCS does that successfully. The teachers are wonderful. The kids are kind and calm and don't watch very much tv (if any) so there is very little "sponge bob talk" here. My kids have learned how to knit, crochet, speak Japanese and they have learned far more, academically, than they did at the LAUSD neighborhood school they attended before switching to OCS. Love this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

Great school. Individual attention, waldorf influence teaching. This is a creative approach to education. Teachers and administration are dedicated to children education in good environment. Very please with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

The best experience a child or parent can have is to belong to a school like this. The stuff is incredible, teachers are amazing, my daughter is so happy to come everyday to school, She is learning having fun.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2013

a fairly dysfunctional school that bored our daughter. The level of education was somewhat better than the local public schools but lacks the spark that a great school has. Wasn't very responsive to the needs of our child and suffered from being a bit formula driven.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2012

What a beautiful and safe place that teaches the important values in life. Students are taught to learn and not to perform. The curriculum offers lots of art, theatre, gardening, Japanese and music. There is no TV in the class room and parents are asked to keep the children 'media free' on weekdays. What a difference it makes! The children are calm and focused in the class room and ready and eager to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2012

My daughter attended Ocean Charter school for 2 1/2 years. Her first year was overall a fairly successful and happy transition, which thereafter began to go downhill as my daughter become the object of bullying, which was ignored by the teacher and staff, or which my daughter was blamed for causing. Her last year, was an absolutely horrible experience for our entire famiily, most of the teachers for her 6th grade year were new to the school and inept in the Waldorf method, and incapable of controlling the students. My family and family friends had to band together to ensure my daughter spent as little time on campus as possible, without one of us there to monitor to do our best that she not come home in tears, why the reaction of the staff and teachers was "all 6th grade girls get teased." I eventually reported the bullying to L.A. Unified, which seemed to make them take the matter a bit more seriously. My daughter attended a different school for 7th and 8th grade - where she is an A & B student, gifted athlete, and surrounded by friends. Ocean Charter was the problem! Notably, the child who bullied my daughter the most, was the child of a teacher at the school. hmmmm......
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2012

Both my children attended OCS K-6th and were prepared when they both went on to private middle schools. My thinking as to why my children did so well is that I bought into the philosophy of limited media. We have carried that philosophy over to their new schools and it is working out great. The school requires that the parents participate and if you are not interested in helping the school this is not the place for you. Please take the time to see what the school is about and choose accordingly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2012

OCS has the potential to be a wonderful school. The teachers are (for the most part) excellent and loving, but the administration is incompetent and dishonest. OCS has lost so many excellent teachers because of the lack of support from their admin. Most of the parents are lovely, but the few bad apples make everyone's life miserable. Administration gives into their demands and teachers are unable to do their jobs effectively. It's difficult to create a nurturing environment for children when the teachers are stressed out and unhappy. If you are looking for a stable environment for your children, OCS is not the place. A change in administration is much needed and a better system for dealing with the ridiculous parents who believe their child can do no wrong. The school has wonderful curriculum and passionate teachers...it's a shame that all of that becomes lost in the hands of incapable leaders.


Posted April 12, 2012

My son went to eighth grade at Ocean Charter. It was an awful experience for us, his teacher was incredibly inept. If there is a problem, the staff blame the student for anything that is less than satisfactory. The special ed is especially lacking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2012

Your child will be happy here, in a way you never thought was possible at a public school (or at least in California public schools over the past dozen years). Homework, curriculum, instructional techniques, and classrooms are all designed with the child in mind. Sometimes it can be worrying that your kids are having such a different experience than the regular public schools, both in timing of curriculum and exposure to media and computers. But don't worry -- just look at the well-adjusted 8th graders that come out of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2011

What is the last poster talking about? Homelessness is like a permanent vacation. Seriously, though, do you think the principal would tell other families, "Have a nice vacation." And, then, point to the homeless mom and say, "Oh, you poor dear. Good luck to you finding a home over the holiday." Give me a break.


Posted September 2, 2011

I have 3 children at OCS and they love this school. Just like any place it has it's issues that are mostly addressed quickly and with passion. If you want a place that will barely watch your kids, much less educate them, put them in just any old public school. If you are looking for a place that has an extremely active, intelligent curriculum and incredible parent involvement then OCS is perfect for you. OCS has had their fair share of administrative problems in the past. There always seems to be one or two very intense and often irrational parents that have nothing better to do than complain about the little things that bug them about various administrators or teachers. The majority of the parents, though, truly admire the efforts of the school administration. I just think that an alternative school such as OCS tends to attract very passionate and opinionated parents who think the school is something that it is not. Again it's not for everybody. You know what's best for your family. We have been through quite a lot of ups and downs with this school yet we feel very fortunate to have discovered it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2011

I love my sons teachers, the staff and his fellow students!. My son is going into his 7th year @ this school and he has done so well. He has thrived as a student, friend and over all citizen. This school has given him so much depth, knowledge and appreciation for the arts, language and community. He has grown into a fine young man in part because of his experiences @ Ocean. In his state tests scores he has consistently done well, even in the middle school. This is a very special school, not for everyone, but my son has unequivocally thrived here, how many public schools can you say have accomplished this?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2011

teachers were great. The school is an awsome school. Everyone was really nice. The school was very good in teaching you in math.


Posted June 25, 2011

OCS test scores for middle school Math and English compare very favorably with other westside middle schools. Do your own comparisons. Our kids are doing great academically at OCS and we love the rich curriculum.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2011

OCS is a lovely place and there is a really nice community here. The plants and gardens are beautiful. Parental involvement is huge for fundraising and community events. Waldorf curriculum is gentle and loving, although the Waldorf rituals can feel secretive. What really disappoints me though is the lack of academic substance in the upper grades. I was told that Waldorf starts slow in the lower grades (which I love and think is done well at OCS) then soars past conventional schools in the upper elementary school grades, but this is not happening at OCS. The administration is unresponsive and unapologetic about this. I know a number of parents who are very troubled by the slacking academics and are pulling their children out, paying for private tutors or doing semi-home schooling because they know their children are behind and are missing out. It's a great school if you want a nurturing, progressive community and a beautiful school, but if your child loves to learn and you want them to have a good, solid academic education this is not the place. Transfers out of OCS say that their children were significantly behind. I don t know how this warrants an 8 rating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2011

In reading the reviews from2005-2009 I really must say how great we thought the school would become but alas 50 point drop in STAR and more then half the 6th grade left rather then suffer another year of ineptitude, and more left at the spring/fall semester shift. The middle school is a sinking and stinking ship with an administration that covers their inability to lead with "concerned" nods and "smiles"and fire most of the middle school teachers year after year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 22, 2010

As parent-founded schools grow, I think it is common for parents to feel excluded from decision making-- it is hard to be as included as a school grows from 160 to almost 400. Employees' right to confidentiality conflicts with parents desire to know why one teacher is retained and another let go. That said, magical things happen at Ocean Charter. The environment is overwhelmingly supportive and safe. The teachers are creative. The curriculum is beautiful. The lower grades are especially strong. Some of the parents are exceedingly hard to please and are used to private school "service". This is a public school where the learning challenges are way more diverse than at an exclusive private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2010

Ocean Charter School has a great community, with wonderful teachers dedicated to providing the children with a creative 'Whole Child' curriculum. Look at the children's faces showing their enthusiasm for discovery, exploration and bio-dynamic gardening. We enjoy the hands on learning approach and understand the depth of the academics interwoven into the curriculum with a strong arts foundation. What a dynamic school and faculty who has the intention of creating the opportunity for each child to gain the capacity to 'think' for themselves. Just imagine if we could all do mathematics while skipping rope and singing- what a happy way to do accounting. What a magical school grounded in the principals of creative education and a strong healthy community of families together building this dynamic Charter School. Many families have helped set up the school, dig the gardens and raise this Charter school over the past years. It has now over 370 children enrolled from K-8th Grade. The Whole Child Curriculum teaches children in a safe, protective and naturally beautiful environment using methods that fill each child with delight, wonder and enthusiasm. To facilitate this ease of learning, classroom teachers stay with the children for three-year cycles. "Ocean Charter School's Whole Child Curriculum, informed by the Waldorf educational approach and built on a foundation of creativity and self-confidence, grows with the child to balance imagination, critical thinking and academic excellence. This foundation, combined with a focus on ecological and social responsibility, nurtures a sense of delight and wonder about the world, as well as respect for nature and humanity."
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

780

Change from
2012 to 2013

-95

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

780

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-95

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
67%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
29%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
42%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students21%
Females26%
Males17%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino0%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate11%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students43%
Females41%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate52%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students32%
Females29%
Males36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)33%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate32%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students59%
Females50%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females88%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students77%
Females85%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females68%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students39%
Females47%
Males29%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate44%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students61%
Females74%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females77%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females73%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females69%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students52%
Females46%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students21%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students57%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students35%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 61% 27%
Hispanic 22% 51%
Asian 8% 11%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Black 3% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 20%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 144 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
69%
agree
 
District average
72%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
69%
 

District average

 
70%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
89%
agree
 
District average
70%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
89%
 

District average

 
78%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
74%
agree
 
District average
68%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
74%
 

District average

 
66%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents14433%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

This school has not yet provided program information.


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12606 Culver Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90066
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 827-5511

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