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GreatSchools Rating

Los Feliz Charter School For The Arts

Charter | K-6 | 500 students

We are best known for project based/arts curriculum.

 

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Living in Los Angeles

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $339,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,330.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 11 ratings
2011:
Based on 27 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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183 reviews of this school


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Posted November 25, 2011

I am soooo shocked by the bad reviews. My son is very happy here. We left a high performing school that only taught kids to take tests, be competitive and hateful with each other and we are forever grateful for having a choice like LFCSA. They put the love of learning back into my son's life (which he'd lost at his old school). The teachers DO care about the kids. The best thing about a charter school is that if you're not happy here, then you can pull your kid O-U-T!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2011

I agree with most of the negative comments, except about the teachers, they do care. It is not there fault that Los Feliz seems to be a dumping ground for students who cannot cut it in traditional schools. There seemed to be an overwhelming amount of of students with ADD, ADHD and other learning/behavioral disabilities. It appeared to me, that only until the end of last year they brought it some specialized teachers to handle this. We spent two years believing and sad to say, it cost two years of our sons education and a large sum of donated dollars and time. I do not blame the school. I blame myself for choosing a dream over reality. He started to fall behind other peers who were attending local public schools very quickly. He would complain about other children not respecting his space, back pains from sitting on the floor and the noise. As an "Arts Charter" - he came home with three pieces of art for the year. He did love the dance program, the teacher was amazing, he is now gone. Now that we are in a traditional public school, he has excelled and is once again up to par. I am sorry LFCSA, I feel cheated. Again I don't blame you, I blame myself for not doing my homework.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2011

Since my children started this school in kindergarten I have never once had to persuade them to go to school. They love it so much they are never sick, and in fact, many of their schoolmates compete over how few sick days they can have. I suspect even the parents who had problems with this school would say the same thing. Elementary school should be a joyful place of learning setting up the adult to be curious and intellectual for the rest of his or her life. This is LFCSA. I drive an hour and half each way every day for this experience and its totally worth it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2011

I positively reviewed this school last year and was not part of any paid program to do so! My children thrive here and my older child scored in the upper 90th percentile on her math and english state tests. There are some growing pains with the new facility, an overwhelmed principal and some teachers who didn't take to the new environment and moved on. But overall if you're looking for a non-test-centered, developmental education where the whole child is educated and are willing to trust the system this school is where it's at. Despite the growing pains this place has more passion, dedication, creativity, nurturing and care than I've seen at any other school - including some private. And we've been at several since starting Kinder.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2011

Some of these negative reviews seem so personal and angry. We have been with the school from the beginning and our children are happy, confident learners. My eldest scored 100% in math on her state tests and I can't get her to put a book down. While we have had a great experience, I can understand how some folks may have frustrations with the lack of communication by admin. Personally, I share this frustration and can understand how that can unfairly tarnish one's view of the school as a whole. In my opinion, that has generated most of the negativity. Our current principal has seemed overwhelmed with solely handling the rapid growth of the school. Admin short-staffing and unclear delegating has created a shaky infrastructure.The board also needs to roll up their sleeves and seriously get involved. That being said, the teachers are amazing and dedicated. The curriculum is innovative. The children are engaged and happy. The community is strong. I am hopeful that once the long search for a new Principal and Director of Operations is final, LFCSA will embark on a smoother path and make any few disgruntled parents, heard and helped. This is a unique and wonderful school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2011

I loved the idea of the school, and readily supported it, but over the years I have found the vision of the school to be disturbingly myopic. We doubled in size last year, and our "rent" went from $24,000 to over $500,000. Instead of fundraising for programs, and more teachers/smaller classrooms, we are packing in as many kids as can be allowed and hitting up parents for rent money. I'm worried. How long can this go on? The original plan got hijacked, and the quality of education has been held hostage. New parents are not drinking the kool-aid. I believe there is a great idea, and great potential here still, but it needs serious rethinking and rescuing. The school is worth investing in- if everyone acts truthfully about where we really are. Right now, too many of us are either goo-goo eyed or in denial.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 21, 2011

There are approx 78 reviews from new parents from start of 2010schoolyear that were part of A CONTEST to win money--they don t reflect the truth, just giddy, new parents/family/friends posting away. This last bunch of reviews show the tip of the iceberg of a LOT of disgruntled parents (enormous student & teacher turnover at this school!) who see that their kids are not getting an education, just a learning experience. A year lost for a child can be devastating. Teachers dote on extremely verbal kids and leave the others to wither w/o self esteem. Reading just right means some are ahead, some on grade level, and a whole bunch BELOW GRADE LEVEL and no one bothers to help them get anywhere up to speed. Teachers do not have the support they need. DWOK is supposed to be used as a SUPPLEMENT to a curriculum. There is no planned curriculum. This may be fun for K-1 kids, but upper grades are way behind their public school counterparts. I honestly don t think that the parents of kids who ve been here for many years really understand how far behind their kids are. 8 teachers (almost the entire teaching staff!) left this year. 54 kids per class space (2 classes in one area)=mayhem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2011

I sadly must agree with most of the comments made by the parents who feel that LFCSA let our children down. As a parent of 2 children who left our supposedly good elementary hoping for a positive change this was not the answer. I begin by saying I don't believe that the teachers are disinterested but they don't buy the program...no phonics, no homework, no handwriting. They where "overwhelmed" by the new site with no walls, class sizes jumping from 22 to 28, and a huge communcation gap (8 of 18 teachers left some with no new prospects). Here is the truly sad part, in 1 year my kids have lost so much ground we where advised to retain them in a local private school. The reading program was a train wreck and the kids didn't learn anything about pride in delivering quality work. We are seeking outside support thru afterschool learning programs to get them back up to speed. Infact it was suggested that they would be behind even entering a conventional LAUSD school! The old guard isn't interested in opinions voiced by new parents expect to be shut down..." maybe you should consider another school we have a long wait list!" LFCSA is an example of good intentions going off the rails.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2011

As a teacher at LFCSA, I am constantly inspired. I'm inspired by the program, the families and most of all, the students. Our program allows me as the teacher to be an observer, a listener and a facilitator of knowledge. I am not the expert in every area, I am a side-by-side learner. I am extremely proud of what we have been able to accomplish these past few years, especially at the new site and I cannot wait to see what's ahead. I am looking forward to an excellent year full of smiles, ah-ha moments and fun.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 24, 2011

Not the kind of progressive school I anticipated - especially when it comes to attempts at behavior management. Kindergarteners are routinely given exclusionary timeouts, sent to the principal's office or sent home. Kids have been forgotten while sitting outside the principal's office waiting to be talked to. Kids are sent to the front office and then told they can return to class but not participate in DWOK (the social studies curriculum) as punishment... after sitting alone in a chair by the copier for fifteen to twenty minutes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2011

We came to LFCSA last year, after 4 years in a progressive, arts-based private school that we loved. I am thrilled with LFCSA. The school really sticks to it's philosophy. The teachers are loving, compassionate, creative and dedicated. My son's reading skills improved greatly. He used to hate reading, and now he discusses books with his friends. The arts teachers are absolutely amazing, and the writing instruction in 3rd grade is better than I got in highschool. The communication is much better than anything I have experienced with other schools- Regular e-mails from the principal, a weekly newsletter, parent yahoo groups, etc. It is easy to feel a part of a community because there are so many volunteer opportunities, and it is nice to be around so many like-minded, creative and interesting parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2011

We left our highly rated public school only to find that many of the problem children at that school migrated to LFCSA. My son hates the incredible din of the "classrooms" and I can't stand the stand-offish behavior of the staff. Many of the teachers don't have the experience to handle these crowded classrooms nor the difficult students attracted to an alternative experience. We pray to get into Larchmont Charter but are happy to go back to our traditional but creative public school as well. We are done with this under-developed over-touted school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2011

Unfortunately, I found this school to be more about Students Last and Parents First. This school is simply a daycare center for parents in the entertainment industry who want to have a common place for networking...their kids school. It's more about making $$ for the school, (I guess...someone must be taking the $$; however we are never told how much is collected and where it is being spent...no "open accounting books" are found here....), then to ensure their kids are actually learning...at least the basics other than reading and writing. I do give this school credit that its more a good fit for those students being reared to become screenwriter/writers and or artists, etc...So much for having a well-rounded education...oh well...I'm guessing some parents don't care about that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2011

Our child loves to come to school, the teachers are all very dedicated, caring, talented individuals, we are making friends with parents and their children, people step up to support the school in so many ways, there is always so much going on to bring interesting and new things to the kids, and the curriculum focuses on teaching the kids to become life long learners. We are proud to be a part of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 14, 2011

This school has absolutely blown us away! My son is thriving there. He went into kindergarten nervous and not knowing how to read or write. He emerged incredibly confident, happy, writing his own stories every day and reading everything in sight! More importantly, he LOVES to learn. I was afraid his creativity would be stifled when he went to elementary school, but this school really, really values the creativity and individuality of each child and my son is even MORE creative now then he was at the beginning of the year. His teacher was the best teacher I have ever come across in my entire life, she has been with the school since it's inception and is an amazing teacher and person. The parents are very involved and it is a wonderful community. I LOVE THIS SCHOOL and cannot wait for my daughter to go!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2011

I am shocked by the bad reviews. Sure, the school is understaffed and a bit chaotic at times. But what freaking public school isn't? My daughter is thriving here. She genuinely loves to learn and we attribute that to the curriculum and her amazing, loving (not to mention approachable) teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2011

Few teachers care unless you R the VIP crowd. THE BETTER TEACHERS WERE FIRED BECAUSE THEY HAD A THOUGHT & DID NOT FIT THE PUPPET MOLD. Education is below AVERAGE, 800-870 IS AVERAGE FOR THOSE WHO DON'T KNOW. We GOT OUT. Sadness for the children WE LEFT BEHIND, we love them DEARLY & MISS THEM. VERY BITTER SWEET. WE WANTED THIS TO WORK FOR OUR CHILDREN, OUR COMMUNITY. THERE IS NO COMMUNITY. PARENTS BICKER BECAUSE THERE IS SO MUCH SEGREGATION. 70% of the parents who HELPED start this school are GONE. More leaving this year. EVERYBODY LEAVES WITH THEIR POLITICAL ANSWER TO SAVE FACE. SAD THAT PEOPLE ARE AFRAID TO SAY 'IT'S NOT GOOD, GET OUT!'. Do not be fooled by the beauty of THIS school. SHE IS STUNNING! THE NOISE POLLUTION IS HORRID. PARENTS NOT WELCOMED. THEY WANT YOUR $'S BUT HAVE NO IDEA HOW TO RAISE THEM. LFCSA IS CONTROLLED BY A FEW, THEY WILL NEVER CARE WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY OR THINK. THUS, BAD LEADERSHIP. IT HAS GONE ON FROM THE START. IT WILL NOT CHANGE. UNLESS YOU LIVE IN THE AREA OR YOUR PUBLIC SCHOOL IS HORRID DO YOUR CHILD A FAVOR LOOK ELSEWHERE. A WAR ON THIS SITE FOR YEARS & FOR THOSE WHO CAN'T ADMIT IT & KEEP GOING, BLESS THEIR SOULS. IS IT WORTH YOUR CHILDS EDUCATION?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2011

Our daughter loves to go to school, loves her teachers (she started in Kindergarden and is now in 2nd grade), she loves to read and write and she is curious about the world. We attribute this all to the wonderful and dedicated staff at LFCSA who despite the current disaster in public education funding are able to make this great school work. Parents who complain should try to be part of the solution (the school makes a strong statement about parent participation to prospective parents) rather than complain. There is no perfect school, but LFCSA sure comes close.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2011

Dont make the same mistake we did... do not put your child in this school. Teachers are uninterested, unmotivated and unconcerned to teach. While staff/administration/personnel are never available to answer a call. You cant even leave a message. I dont understand how this school is ran. Its a big joke. Even the principal is leaving now.. Im sure she wants out before it all comes out. BTW the principlal is hardly there. All the school wants is money and more money. Donations and sponsors. They should concentrate on the STUDENTS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2011

Mislead, saddened and ultimately defeated. Unsupported teachers, uncommunicative environment with administration and teachers. Large class sizes. 1 to 28+. Problematic acoustics. Positive note...the dance teacher. A remarkable pied piper ex circus performer who enchants and motivates the kids through dance.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

836

Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

836

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
40%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students75%
Females73%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)74%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students72%
Females66%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Females55%
Males37%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino19%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)51%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability49%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)39%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate43%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students61%
Females60%
Males61%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate65%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females79%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females79%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)70%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate80%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females73%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)66%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students48%
Females49%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino15%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only49%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)26%
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students66%
Females60%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino30%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students44%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 60%
Hispanic 31%
Black 6%
Asian 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/AN/A
English language learners 7%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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Special education / special needs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Special education

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 221 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
66%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
66%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
81%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
81%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
72%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
72%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents22144%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:30
School end time
  • 2:50
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Farnaz Golshani
Fax number
  • (323) 539-2815

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Mathematics
  • Special education

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Parent involvement
  • We feel that students are more successful when family and community continually support the students' activities and learning. lfcsa parents are asked to volunteer and giving a variety of ways to contribute. there are also numerous committees to join where fresh ideas and help are always welcome. visit the community section on our website to find out more.
School leaders can update this information here.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Los Feliz Elementary
Micheltorena Elementary
Franklin Elementary
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2709 East Media Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90065
Website: Click here
Phone: (323) 539-2810

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