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GreatSchools Rating

Ralph Waldo Emerson Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 650 students

 

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Living in Los Angeles

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $540,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $2,130.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 13 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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91 reviews of this school


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Posted August 1, 2008

We have been an Emerson family for 4 years in a row, and our children have been completely safe. All schools (including Paul Revere and Palms receive 'opportunity transfers-you can check the LA Unified website. Emerson is by far the smallest school of the three mention-Paul Revere has 1000 more students and Palms has 700 more. If you want a much smaller school in an upsale neighborhood (Westwood), where the students are put in classes (School for Advanced Studies) with students of similiar abilities, choose Emerson! Brand new principal as of 07-08 school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2008

Do not send your child here. It is not safe. They bus in kids that have been kicked out of other schools -- LAUSD calls them opportunity transfers. Because the building supposedly have architectural significance they have not updated anything -- this school may be the only one left in LAUSD without air-conditioning. Many classoom have no computers. Send your kid to Paul Revere or Palm.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2008

I was a student at Emerson and I just graduated this year.Emerson is a great middle school.It has great teachers .To be honest some teachers can be mean but there are teachers who are really great.I have learned alot at this school and I have made alot of friends.Kids should really go to this school it is the best!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 17, 2008

Very nice,nice & educated staff,my daughter and I love emerson
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 29, 2008

Hiya, i'm a mom with a beef. There are persistent false rumours about Emerson's safety by neighborhood parents who send their kids to private school. Emerson's safety record beats all the surrounding middle schools year after year because of contained campus and security policies. It is so good, in fact, that we constantly have to fight to keep our safety officer to protect the premises from outside threat. Take the time to look it up. Wild talk about guns? We've never had a gun on campus in the memory of our longest serving teachers. We don't have gangs on our campus, like say, Palms, for the simple reason that this is not their neighborhood and they are not trying to protect turf. Kids feel safe, and they are.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2008

Fact: If your kids come to Emerson scoring high, they will leave Emerson school scoring high. Stop looking at the API overall and start looking at kids in your demo. Did you notice that the school rating on this site can be broken down by the performance of kids from the same kind of family as yours? For example, the overall school rating for Emerson is 4, yet our school rating based on performance of our kids from parents with college to graduate school level educations is 7 to 9. Considering that classes are streamed by ability, doesn't that make sense? Then you are comparing apples with apples.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2007

My daughter and her friends have been so happy at Emerson. Even those who chose to go to other schools have come back for 8th grade...it's like coming 'home.' The teachers she's had, bar one, have been amazing. She's had some wonderful educational opportunities in a low stress, high achievement atmosphere. We really like the new principal, too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2007

We ve encountered many misconceptions about Emerson particularly about busing and safety. First of all, no children are bused to the school for integration. The students who ride the buses live within Emerson s boundaries. As for safety, Emerson is as safe as any school anywhere. Our daughter, currently in 6th grade, and her older friends at Emerson have not encountered any bullying, gang activities or violence. Everyone, including teachers and staff, is held accountable. It's a shame that many eliminate Emerson as a possible middle school strictly because of rumors and misconceptions. This school offers many dynamic programs and opportunities from its outstanding drama department to its highly differentiated GATE program. We have found Emerson to be a community school with a small-school feel. Everyone we have encountered, from the dedicated teachers to the vibrant new principal, is constantly encouraging students to be the best they can be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 1, 2007

The SAS/IHP program is extremely challenging for all 3 grades. It is truely a 'school within a school' with about 100 students per grade. The students become very good friends after 3 years together in all of the same classes. This is a great neighborhood school where students from Westwood, Warner and Fairburn can easily walk to and from school. By the time they are in 8th grade it is nice to be able to give them that independence. Most of their friends will still live close by (just like elementary), and they won't always have to wait for 'Mom or Dad' to pick them up or to set up a car pool, or sit in traffic.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2007

My name is Cassie Hobbs-Monterroso, my son Juan Antonio Monterroso is 12 years old, in the 6th grade, and he goes to Emerson Middle School. He is in the Advanced class. I like this School a lot, it is clean, has beautiful grounds, and the teachers really seem to care a lot about the students. The principal seems decicated to learning. I like the uniform policy, and the atmosphere is warm, friendly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2007

I would have to say that maybe this year with the new principal things wil be better. I am very disappointed to see such a great neighborhood and such a terrible school. Major events take place and no care or concern is admionistered or even advised to parents and students. Unfortunately, I feel like this is the only school that is descent in comparison to the few ones in my area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2007

Emerson actively seeks parent involvement at all levels, I've never lacked for something to do! Teachers teach the subjects that they are credentialed for - we have a very high level of teacher retention at the school. Regarding the 'locker area' - Emerson only has lockers for PE, where the PE teachers remain while students are accessing the locker area. The locker rooms are then locked during classes until it is time to change and they can be supervised again.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2007

Suggestions for improvement of school with a 'good heart' and some promise: Train teachers and all staff to engage parents and kids as clients and partners. Management staff must not give parents the run around. Teachers should comunicate regularly and actively with the parents using email. Stay the coursse with discipline at the school. A small percentage of slackers and bad apples can set the tone if the school allows it. Implement innovative strategies to reduce delinquency. Raise expectations in the classroom from the students. Even the SAS/IHP can benefit from a tightening of standards and higher goal setting. All in all, this is a good school with good people who are struggling to stay above the surface like so many other schools in the NCLB swamp. But with a sustained push from the principal, the staff, the teachers, and the parents, it can break free and shine eventually.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2007

I think the school needs alot of improvement, such as more parent involvement. the school needs teachers that will comit to the subject they are supposed to teach. i think the school needs more security specially in the locker area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2007

This is my son s first year at Emerson and so far it has not been good. I ve had so my issues with the school s administration and staff. Every time I call the school because I have a question or concern I get the run-around. I get transfer to several people before I get a clear answer in ENGLISH. No one ever knows what is happening in the school. I m also frustrated with the school s low curriculum. I had heard good things about the principle, but apparently it seems that she is not taking enough care over her school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2007

I was really impressed with the transitional program Emerson provided for incoming six graders. However, some of the teachers are very dismissive and show little concern when a student is struggling academically. I phoned one teacher 3x and received no return phone call. I also did not receive proper notice from this teacher of my son's academic struggles so that I could have dealt with this problem accordingly. OK counselors, OK principle, wonderful music program (don't give six graders a lot of options to join the programs). Can become a good school with the proper leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2006

The only good part about Emerson is their IHP/SAS program, my daughter is in the 8th grade and is taking Algebra 2, many other schools will not accept a student into algebra 2 or geometry because the do not have the teachers to teach it, in this way Emerson is unique. I would suggest LACES and Walter Reed, if your student is advanced in math. There is also a very good drama program, your student must get into it, it looks good if they want to apply to Beverly High, or North Hollywood High.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2006

School in need of renovation; decent teachers, but facility is rundown, drab, whole place has a feeling of depression. typical LAUSD school - budget cuts, etc.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2006

Emerson has an exceptional staff from the principal to the support staff. All stakeholders put in the extra effort to make it a conducive learning environment for all students. I highly recommend this school to all students. Many diverse cultures are represented in the student body. All students' needs are the priority.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted April 10, 2006

My daughter is an international student here at Emerson. In comparison I am disappointed with the schools academic structure. I immediately found out about the SAS program at the school. There was a drastic improvement... However the quality between the two is far too troubling for a parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

728

Change from
2012 to 2013

-37

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

728

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-37

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
73%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

228 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
50%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

194 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
25%

2010

 
 
24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

137 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
31%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

264 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
42%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
19%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

268 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
39%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

264 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females47%
Males38%
African American38%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learner6%
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented87%
Parent education - not a high school graduate21%
Parent education - high school graduate44%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)44%
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to state39%

Math

All Students40%
Females42%
Males38%
African American24%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Non-economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability40%
English learner12%
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduate21%
Parent education - high school graduate28%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)17%
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate67%
Parent education - declined to state42%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students85%
Females87%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented88%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to state64%

English Language Arts

All Students49%
Females60%
Males37%
African American51%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disability8%
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner13%
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduate32%
Parent education - high school graduate33%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to state45%

Math

All Students28%
Females29%
Males28%
African American21%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)46%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Non-economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disability4%
Students with no reported disability32%
English learner7%
Fluent-English proficient and English only32%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented70%
Parent education - not a high school graduate20%
Parent education - high school graduate11%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)39%
Parent education - college graduate7%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state34%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students21%
Females25%
Males16%
African American11%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)31%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability22%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented50%
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)15%
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state9%

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Females50%
Males34%
African American41%
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disability3%
Students with no reported disability47%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented82%
Parent education - not a high school graduate21%
Parent education - high school graduate38%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)22%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to state43%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students21%
Females16%
Males23%
African American15%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino20%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged20%
Non-economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disability3%
Students with no reported disability27%
English learner22%
Fluent-English proficient and English only20%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)17%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state17%

Geometry

All Students67%
Females67%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented72%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students37%
Females40%
Males34%
African American29%
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino24%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)62%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disability3%
Students with no reported disability41%
English learner3%
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented82%
Parent education - not a high school graduate26%
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)11%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to state33%

Science

All Students52%
Females52%
Males52%
African American51%
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disability3%
Students with no reported disability58%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduate45%
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)41%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to state46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 53% 52%
White 20% 26%
Black 19% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 11%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Photography
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 679 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

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This school
63%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
69%
 

Students

This school

 
57%
 
Healthy, respectful relationshipsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a positive learning environment and cultivates an atmosphere of respect. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Support (Students), Commitment and Collaboration (Employees), Satisfaction (Students), School Support (Students).

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This school
59%
agree
 

Students

This school

 
59%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

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This school
70%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
95%
 

Students

This school

 
50%
 

Employees

This school

 
64%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
64%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
64%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents4911%
Students61694%
Employees1425%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Dimone Watson
Fax number
  • (310) 474-6517

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Parent center
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Photography
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1650 Selby Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 234-3100

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