Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Open Charter Magnet School

Charter | K-5

 
 

Living in Los Angeles

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $595,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,840.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 16 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

156 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted June 29, 2014

The best thing going for Open is its diverse community (love it!) and parent support. Other than that I don t find the school to be all that special. Yes, we are fortunate to have gotten in as Open is a huge step up from our home school. In regards to "middle finger's post" My child was in green cluster this past school year and I must admit I was shocked at the lack of supervision and chaotic environment that students were subjected to on a daily basis. The teachers are very nice and nurturing, but do not prepare the students academically to be ready for first grade. I am not sure if all the parents that came to Open s defense had a child go through green cluster, but middle finger's mom has some valid points. I get that kids will be kids and will pick up inappropriate behaviors anywhere. My gripe is making sure my child is prepared for the next grade level. I have spoken to former greenie parents, and they say it does get better (3rd, 4th, & 5th). By third everything clicks and students are where they need to be. My child will return to Open, and I will continue to supplement her curriculum based on what I feel she is missing. Middle Finger's mom, I suggest you do the same.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 21, 2014

Open School is an absolute gem in the landscape of LAUSD! As a parent of 11 years at Open I feel compelled to rebut some of these negative reviews. We had all 3 of our kids at Open school and I cannot begin to say how grateful I am that we were lucky enough to be at such an amazing learning environment. The staff and teachers have an unparralled dedication and passion to make this school the wonderful community it is, and they are always striving to make things even better. Criticism is one thing, but wild and untrue accusations need to be responded to. The very idea that kindergardeners are learning curse words and playing violent video games unsupervised in the classroom is simply ludicrous! The yard supervision is caring and proactive. Maybe things aren't always resolved the way the child thinks it should be but they are kids, there are two sides to every story. And yes, things happen on the yard-these are grade school kids for pete's sake!! But I and many families I've known over many years know what a great job staff and teachers do to go above and beyond to support our kids! Love this school and grateful for it's impact on my children's lives.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2014

Overall, this is a school that cares about student education and offers something that we do not get at other schools, which is the ability for our kids to learn in a constructivist environment. I agree that no school is perfect, nor is Open, but given this people should not be chastised for giving their opinion. Office and outside yard school staff should monitor and censor their inappropriate and non-solicited comments on email listservs and social media. Taking two comments posted on social media about the school and posting a dissertation about it shows the lack of respect for parents and students. Outside and inside staff should have a smile on their face to have a job, and should have a smile on their face that they have a principal who they can run over. The school could improve by having a stronger leader, with stronger organizational leadership skills. Yes, I am referring to the principal. She is quick to shut parents down when they approach her concerning difficulties unable to be resolved on the parent-teacher level, which is my major problem with her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2014

We have loved our experience at Open School. And as my daughter prepares to move on to LACES in the Fall, we are so grateful for the education she received during the 5 years she attended this gem of a school. Though the class sizes are large due to the Team Teaching model the school employs, my child always got the individualized attention she needed. Her teachers were kind, enthusiastic and nurturing, the work always interesting and inspiring. And the best part for me, were the families that you meet here. The parents are super involved and motivated to create the best possible experience for their children and come from all areas of the city, all socio-economic backgrounds, all orientations and ethnicities. It is such a diverse school community! And it is filled with kind children that are taught respect for themselves, others and the environment. I had high expectations coming into Open and it definitely delivered for our family. Is it a perfect school? No. I still wish class sizes were smaller and there was more money available for even more amazing projects, but you will not find a better public school in LAUSD. We are grateful for our time spent at this lovely place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2014

How can I possibly tell you what the Open School has meant to my family for the last nine years . I could easily start off by writing about my oldest son who learned that he was a writer under the guidance of his teachers who encouraged him to "take a seed idea and to devolope it into a watermelon moment" or to write field guides, and fairy tales while remembering to edit. Or perhaps I could share stories about my youngest son who learned the truth in the statement "that it takes a village" when it came to overcoming his vision, speech and spelling dificulties while under the loving care of the schools resource department. What I can't possibly do is name all of the positive roll models who have touched their lives and have natured their abiltities to be kind, resourcefull, and independent thinkers. As students this has translated into them both recieving high honors in their gpa in both junior and senior high school. But as young men, they have a respect for nature, a love of music, and an abilty to look beyond a persons outer appearance and see a potential friend that I as their mom will be forever grateful to the Open School for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2014

My daughter attended another public school for kindergarten but has been in Open for two years. There is an incredible difference between her old school and Open Charter. Parent involvement and parent teacher communication is so much better at Open. I have seen first hand the difference between Open and another LAUSD school and it has little to do with the charter status but with the attention and caring of the staff, teachers and parents. Last year my daughter had some "bullying" issues within her friend group. I brought it up to the teachers and they immediately called all the girls in and worked it through with the teachers and staff. I was so amazed at how quickly and easily they took care of the problem. Prior to the meeting is the only time my daughter has not wanted to go to school. She cried almost every day at her previous school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2014

Open School is one of the most creative, invigorating, caring educational environments I've ever been exposed to, both during my seven years as a parent there, and during my own time as a student anywhere. The two principals who've run Open School during our time there have been gifted leaders who work tirelessly to create a cooperative community in which all voices are heard, even the dissonant ones. These principals constantly reinforce the fact that everyone at the school - staff, administrators, teachers and parents - are on the same page - the page that reads: "Our kids deserve the best education possible." The school has a zero tolerance for bullying and, when conflicts arise, solves those issues with such a fair, even hand that not only my children have learned from the school's methods, I have too. The teachers are unparalleled - smart, hardworking, creative and dedicated. Both my kids, who are extremely different learners, got an equally wonderful education that was tailored specifically to them with incredible caring and attention to their needs. If you're lucky enough to get in to Open Charter, go. You've won the lottery.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2014

Open School is all about the kids. Period. Devoted teachers. My boys are now 17 and 15 and they always ask to go back and visit their teachers. When I was at Open school I was president of the Friends organization and on the governing board my entire 8 years there. I cite the system of collaborative governance as a successful model to this day. If you read the negative reviews below, my answers to the authors follow: 1. It's princiPAL. and you'RE. 2. The parents do not co-teach. I don't send my kids to a school so some random parent can teach my child, I'd rather have my kids taught by an experienced professional. It's not a co-op. 3. I found the teachers and staff extremely accessible and open to hearing concerns. Talk to them. From time to time, disgruntled parents vent on this forum when they want to change or punish the school. my boys moved from one school to another and I know what it 's like when a school is not right for your kids, but I did not try to change or punish that school; it wasn't a BAD school because it wasn't the right school for my kids. I think considering the lack of support from the district it's a miracle what Open School accomplishes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2014

Our daughters had the privilege of attending Open School and it not only was an outstanding experience but one that you dream of for your children. As a family we attended Open for a total of even years. We were a family that was very involved and active throughout our years there serving on committees, fundraising events as well as in the classroom. We were always welcomed and felt appreciated for our much of our contributions. We initially came from the private school sector and felt so lucky to be a part of such a positive, hands on, integrated learning experience in a very diverse school community. Open School is a private school experience at a public school price...ONLY BETTER! The style of learning was fun, interesting and engaging for our children, they loved going to school and they learned beyond what was expected for their grade level. The teachers were caring, invested professionals who truly want only the best for our children and were invested in each child's individual learning experience. What more could anyone ask for? The school was not perfect then...and it will never be. But, what school is? But, it certainly comes closer than any other school we know.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2014

Honestly, the high ratings for Open School are fully warranted. After 6 years at this wonderful school, my son tells me he how fortunate he feels to to have attended "the best school ever." He is fully prepared for middle school, thanks to Open. Our principal is is strong, child-focused and fair. She has the support of the teachers and the majority of parents. I encourage the two parents who wrote critical reviews to set a face-to-face meeting with her to air their grievances. I am certain she would welcome an open and honest discussion. The same applies to those with concerns about supervision and playground culture. Our experience was the polar opposite of those complaining, but Open School's Community of Respect demands that every voice be heard. I encourage these parents to also arrange meetings with their respective teachers at the beginning of the coming school year. Acceptance to Open School is truly like "winning the lottery." Once your child is accepted, you will soon understand why we rave about constructivist teaching, individualized learning, amazing parent led events, parent-supported enrichment programs and the warm and welcoming Open community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2014

My two sons are at Open School and we truly feel so fortunate to be a part of this amazing community. We were so lucky to have both boys go through the kinder program and I cannot say enough about how caring, loving, and experienced the teachers are. In this climate of high stakes testing where some schools make kinders test-prep, I am so thankful that my boys had the opportunity to socialize and learn through play, were pulled into differentiated learning groups for academic instruction (which was awesome because they were taught to their level), and they learned to be problem solvers (plus all the enrichment from music, art, and garden). Although there are many students in the multi-age class, I can honestly say that my sons' teachers know them, their strengths, and areas that they need to improve on. There is always an adult that they can go to when they need help, from teachers, to staff, to parent volunteers. Sending my kids to Open exposes them to diversity, a unique learning community, and a positive environment. They are happy, they are learning, and they are loved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2014

Let's talk about the things that really matter: mission and teaching. Open School has a clear mission, and it has remained true to that mission over 40 years in large part because it has had -- amazingly -- only 4 principals in that time. And the teaching is continuously innovated. In this day and age it is rare -- even at the university level, where I teach -- to find teachers who are able and willing to write their own curriculum. Children can be taught to think critically because their teachers do it day after day year after year as they constantly rework the curriculum and adjust teaching methods to maximize learning. Transition to common core will be a breeze at this school: the basic principles easily align with what Open School has been doing for four decades. Any parent who wants their children to become self-regulated, lifelong learners should give this school a look.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2014

How does a K student learn about "the middle finger" while at school? How does a child, at such a young age, return home to share what new bad words they learned at school today? How does a K child have access to a computer and learn about violent games, only to come home and want to play them in my home? Who is watching the kids when they are learning to chop off the heads on video games? When you try and talk to the principle and make a complaint, she dismisses it. Don't ever try and complain about a teacher, you will be retaliated against. "you should be happy your in the school, why are you complaining" The new principle needs to go back to teaching , she is a better teacher than leader. How did a teacher become a principle when they have had no background in leading a school? The Bullying issue at this school is not handled at all.. The play yard is not supervised well. Each time I visit, I see someone picking on a another child. I have had to address it several times. My child sticks up for herself, but other kids are not and nothing is being done. My child does not know how to read. Her peers are reading. This school is not the super school it claims to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2014

Open is not for everybody, my child did not want to go to school everyday and often begged to be home schooled. Parents are not considered to be co-teachers and their input is not received well at times. They do not consistently use evidence based teaching methods There recently has been high teacher turnover and the new principal is not as objective or experienced as the one that left 2 years ago. One of the 4/5 grade teachers was consistently late arriving to school, at times after 9 am (the school starts at 8:20 am ) this was an almost daily occurrence. The new principal is partial to cronyism which might one day be to the school's detriment. Over the years this school has changed, it is not the same school I enrolled my first child in in the early 2000's It was once one of a kind but with the advent of the Charter school movement and neighborhood schools stepping up that is no longer so. It had a more carefree, accepting feel years ago that for us is no longer there. Bullies are a problem for most schools and that includes Open. Our experience with Open has not been a good experience. Open is not for everyone. I do agree that Open has a great group of parent volunteers.


Posted April 26, 2014

I would love to see reviews from anyone who switched from a private school to Open Charter. My review is based on word of mouth and an initial tour. Thanks!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2014

I've submitted previous reviews of Open in the past, under varying circumstances. Now, having been a parent here for 5 years, under two different principals and about 7 different teachers, I can say without hesitation that while no school is "perfect", Open is probably the best public elementary school in LAUSD. The teachers are committed and work hard to deliver a unique, engaging teacher-created constructivist curriculum. The parent involvement is off the charts, a key critical factor in the school's success. The population is practically a model UN, giving our kids a true integrated diverse experience. The campus is green and beautiful. Sometimes we've had teachers I didn't love at first, but they won me over with their professionalism, dedication, and creativity. We also have extras you won't often find at neighborhood schools, with fantastic specialists - all paid for from parent-raised funds. We feel very fortunate to have had this experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2013

I grew up in a very academic/formal school. I loved it, and did very well. Open is the very opposite, kids don't have exams, grades, even fixed desks. The days go with students investigating and searching for information in different places. One other thing I love is the mixed race/mixed grades. My daughter can learn at her own pace, and not being bogged down but slower students. Now she is the oldest in her group, so she can experience being a leader. And how wonderful is that? Nobody is typecasting the good and bad students like when I grew up. And the best of all, you do not see not even one a student who is not motivated and do not want to go to school. Kids are all excited about school, and having fun while learning. I've never seen anything like it. It is not a school for every student, some kids do need specialized attention, and some parents like to see progression, grades, exams. But if you get picked in the lottery, boy, you really won. We moved from Venice to Westchester just so we could be closer to the school. But what really sold me was that during orientation, I felt excited about going to school, I wanted to be back in school. There are not mane places like it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2013

Open Charter Magnet School is amazing. Being a former student of Open School who culminated in 2012, I would know. All administrators do their job with a great attitude. Open School definitely prepares you for middle school. The classes have mixed grades adjacent to the next so that all grades mingle. Open School has a very unique way of teaching. All classes have a theme that they focus on but the teachers spend most time in math, history, English, and science. Open school has art, music, and PE. There are also opportunities for students to learn how to play instruments. In my experience at Open School I had a great time and made new friends through my six years.


Posted October 8, 2013

The Open School encourages students to constantly assess how a lesson is helping them gain their own understanding. By questioning themselves and their strategies, students become "expert learners." This gives them ever-broadening tools to be life-long learners. Students are taught HOW TO LEARN and take ownership and pride in their own learning. I am very grateful my two children attend The Open School. Our Principal is doing an excellent job handling the situations that are dealt to her. We are a community of Respect and new students sometimes need a little more time to internalize this concept.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

The new administration has changed the culture and sense of community the previous principal instilled. The school has increased in behavior problems due to lack of experience and or classroom management which have allowed bullying and isolation to be overlooked and under investigated. Poor staffing decisions within the past 2 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

917

Change from
2012 to 2013

+4

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

917

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+4

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
77%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females86%
Males68%
African American63%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students83%
Females81%
Males85%
African American74%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females70%
Males65%
African American60%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate59%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females92%
Males82%
African American80%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students93%
Females100%
Males86%
African American88%
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students93%
Females97%
Males88%
African American93%
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females94%
Males71%
African American77%
Asian71%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented85%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Females87%
Males78%
African American57%
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disability73%
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented89%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate76%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students94%
Females94%
Males94%
African American93%
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disability91%
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 36% 26%
Black 26% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 23% 11%
Hispanic 14% 52%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 9%N/A55%
Female 52%N/A48%
Male 48%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) School Experience Survey asks parents, students and employees about their school's learning environment. Results provide insight into school climate, such as whether the school is academically rigorous, engaging, safe, and collaborative. Learn more

We organized questions from the LAUSD School Experience Survey into five categories. The respondent group-level results (parents, students, and school employees) show the percent of each respondent group that agree or strongly agree that the school has positive results for that category.

Overall school results for each category are calculated by averaging across group-level results, ensuring that each respondent group is equally represented. Alongside the results for each school are the aggregated results across all LAUSD schools, which are provided as a basis for comparisons.

Learn more about the LAUSD survey »Close
Based on 353 responses

This school provides ... 1

High academic expectations for all studentsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and students that agree to strongly agree that this school sets high academic expectations for its students and expects them to be college-bound. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Future Expectations (Parents), School Quality (Parents), Future Plans (Parents), Opportunities For Learning (Students), Future Plans (Students).

Close
 
This school
78%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
78%
 

Students

This school

 
78%
 
Healthy, respectful relationshipsWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a positive learning environment and cultivates an atmosphere of respect. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Support (Students), Commitment and Collaboration (Employees), Satisfaction (Students), School Support (Students).

Close
 
This school
94%
agree
 

Students

This school

 
87%
 

Employees

This school

 
100%
 
A safe, clean and orderly environmentWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents, students and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school has a well-kept facility and a safe environment conducive to learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: School Cleanliness (Employees), School Safety (Employees), Safety (Parents), School Cleanliness (Students), School Safety (Students).

Close
 
This school
80%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
97%
 

Students

This school

 
67%
 

Employees

This school

 
77%
 
Strong family engagementWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of parents and employees that agree to strongly agree that this school engages parents and communicates with families to promote student learning. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Parent Involvement (Employees), Feeling of Welcome (Parents), School Involvement (Parents), Teacher to Parent Communication (Parents).

Close
 
This school
85%
agree
 

Parents

This school

 
74%
 

Employees

This school

 
96%
 
Teacher support and opportunities for collaborationWhat's this?

This score measures the percent of employees that agree to strongly agree that this school ensures that teachers work well together, learn from one another, have opportunities for professional development and feel supported by the administration. This score is based on the average of the following LAUSD survey Content Areas: Evaluation (Employees), Opportunities for Involvement (Employees), Professional Development (Employees), Resource Allocation (Employees), Teacher Collaboration and Data Use (Employees).

Close
 
This school
84%
agree
 

Employees

This school

 
84%
 

Based on surveys from:

 RespondentsResponse rate
Parents13541%
Students19992%
Employees1946%

12012-13 Los Angeles Unified School District School Experience Survey

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

5540 West 77th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90045
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 568-0735

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools



Carousel School
Los Angeles, CA


Carousel - Airport Blvd
Los Angeles, CA




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT