Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Great Valley Academy

Charter | K-8 | 641 students

 
 

Living in Modesto

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $110,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $960.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 13 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 17 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

45 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted May 1, 2014

My kids are happy here, we have had one teacher that I wasn't thrilled with but the rest have been excellent and handle individual needs well. My children have been at GVA since Kindergarten. For what it's worth, their STAR test scores are very high. There are good and bad elements at every school but I'm confident my kids are learning and growing and happy here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2013

GVA creates gifted learners in a safe, loved and learning environment. Our child is performing above grade levels in all her subjects and loves most of her teachers. They are caring and create a stimulating learning environment. Foreign language, sign language, physical education, and drama are included in this rounded education. She began in second grade and came from a private school. She improved steadily throughout her years and is in her last year at GVA. Her H.S. career will begin with great expectation because her love of learning flourished while attending GVA. Curriculum problems existed at GVA, but this has been rectified and academic standards are high. The joy of learning is a major strength at GVA and I believe that their efforts to promote teamwork, camaraderie and group effort as well as a push for individual achievement is fundamental. With this in mind, I believe our child is headed to High School with a solid foundation and will excel in her classes. We laid a strong foundation in the early years, but GVA has proven their success by helping create a strong, gifted learner who excels and goes above and beyond in all her subjects. Thank you GVA for doing your part.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2013

Our family absolutely loves GVA. After a horrible Kindergarten and beginning of first grade experience at a public school (where my child felt like part of an army, not a unique individual) I was so thrilled to transfer my child to GVA when space became available. I noticed an immediate change in her attitude and enthusiasm about going to school (no more crying!!), and we owe it all to the philosophy of "safe loved and learning" that GVA has. The teachers and staff are kind and caring, and the Spanish, music, PE and GVA Smart programs are so enriching. As a family, we also appreciate the fact that there are not packets full of "busy work" (aka homework) sent home every week, so that we may enjoy family time and other activities instead. We LOVE GVA!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2013

We have been very satisfied with this school. Our child is in 1st grade and we have had only positive experiences with her teachers, curriculum, sense of community and great kids' care staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2013

Wow, bad experiences here! I know for a fact that no one school can make every single parent happy, so if it doesn't fit go somewhere else. My perspective is that I have been very pleased overall. I have one child who was in high school when GVA started, so I also have that experience to compare with. My two younger kids have gone to GVA from the start. It has not been perfect - both of them have had teachers that I didn't think were the best fit, but that happened outside of GVA as well. My middle child has a math disability and the traditional school she previously attended just told me I would have to work with her at home to bring her up to grade level...I could get no extra help because she was not far enough behind. At GVA we did not request extra help because they started her where she was and then moved forward from there, as opposed to sitting in a class that had moved on without her - leaving her feeling "stupid". After 5 years, she is now at grade level and we are happy with that. She is far above grade level in all other subjects. Once she realized that not being great at math did not define her worth and intelligence, it was a whole new world for her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

I am very pleased with my daughter's progress at this school. There are a lot of negative reviews on this site, but I feel there are more happy parents than unhappy. The school is very different from the traditional school system. My child is receiving an education in subjects the public schools have had to drop due to budget cuts. These include, foreign language, sign language, physical education and music. She is flourishing in all aspects, doing work above her grade level, and enjoys going to school. The school has had several administration changes this year. Each one had me question the school's direction, but the bottom line is my daughter is doing well so they are doing something right. I have no day to day interaction with the administration, but I do with her teacher and the Kids Care staff. Both are amazing in every way. My confidence in the school lies with them and the caring, nurturing environment they provide to my daughter. Both have excellent communication with me. I know within minutes, via email or phone call of any incident (big or small) that should be brought to our attention. We love the school and understand that it might not be right for everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2013

horrible couple of years for GVA DO NOT ENROLL YOUR KIDS HERE please ....last year for my son in this school very disappointing
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2013

The principal leaving was the worst possible thing that could happen to GVA. The life and soul of GVA are gone now. The teachers are demoralized, and now are scared to ruffle any feathers. What a mess they have created, vice principal clueless. This school is just going to be another mediocre school down the street- my kids are out next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2013

I really have always loved this school fought hard to get my kids in here celebrated when they did our first year was great BUT this year no:( been through two principals gossip what's really going on here? My oldest son has struggled since the beginning nothing new this year and I asked for him to be tested however no because they don't see a learning disability I do! He is very different from other kids and I'm tired of watching him struggle and kinda be punished when he tries his best. He was in IVL which didn't carry over this year:( he's had no extra help however has had packs of homework because he doesn't get it done in class and his teacher doesn't know how to help him. Since last teacher conference I've heard he was at a third grade reading level a second grade level now fourth grade level. I'm so confused. There is a bad communication here and I've been really discouraged here:( However my other son couldn't love his teacher more. Always is approachable very happy there. The school in general love the community family safe loved and learning idea but this year it has fallen short.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2013

I'm still trying to convince myself that I made a good decision to send my children to GVA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 14, 2013

What a huge relief to hear the principal resigned. I have been worried for years about the outcome of the administration's decisions/actions regarding the education of GVA's school children. I just hope the school begins to hire administrators and board members with educational experience. As it stands now, I don't believe there is an educational expert among the administration or board, with the exception of one, and he is not in a decision making position. Up until now the only person making decisions for every aspect of GVA has been the, now ex-principal.


Posted March 3, 2013

Unprofessional, poor leadership, and unable to address the needs of students adequately. If you have a special education child, and if your child is getting vision therapy at GVA to address their needs, you may want to read what the American Association of Pediatrics says about vision therapy. Then ask GVA what are they really doing to help the special needs students.


Posted February 26, 2013

Our daughter has gone to GVA since it started the Principal was always hard to deal with, not apoachable, or would not listen to your concerns, she was in Special Ed, but each year would just get a song and dance about why she was still so far behind, just recently we were looking into placing her in another school, just checking out our options, and the Principal and office staff took it upon themselves to give us 1 days notice and kicked her out of school, in which she was schoolless, and 2 grade levels behind. The other Principal that was there for a while was good she would listen and address your concerns. Posting this as do not want anyone else's child to experience the heart break of been told you cannot be at this school anymore, as this was devasting to the child as didn't understand why. Now we know why there was such a high turn of staff at GVA. Safe loved caring enviroment, not!!! this school needs to have more over site, or be closed, they place to much importance on money, and if you have the money, rather than whats best for the kids. Stanislaus County OO Ed needs to over see more of what they do, as they sponser the charter. Would not recommend GVA to anyone, beware
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 4, 2013

What is the current starting pay for teachers? Everyone I've talked to says that the pay is less than standard but no one is willing to give up a number.


Posted September 21, 2012

We knew going into GVA that as a new school and charter it would take a long time for it to develop. It is going in the right direction, there is still room for improvement as with all organizations. Knowing all this I have implemented much enrichment and additional learning for my children to enhance and build on what GVA does. As for the change in leadership at the Modesto campus last week, it really is not fair that there was a firing. Mr. Cole the present principal is very capable and experienced and will do an excellent job of leading GVA forward. Oh, and there is plenty of time for children to have lunch and its longer than 15 minutes! That comment was a bit silly!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2012

My daughter has been there since kindergarten. I decided to give GVA a chance for the simple fact of being a charter school. They seemed to be heading in the right direction but they have implemented many changes during the past 2 years. Their employee turnover rate is high; teachers are quitting because of pay and inconsistent curriculums. GVA is trying to do many things at once and is failing at them all. For example they started a home school program this year, last year they opened the Manteca campus, they also hired and fired a new principal for the Modesto campus all in one year. Overall bad decisions and management have been the highlight of this year. I am moving my daughter to a private school where she will get experienced teachers. One more thing the whole no cafeteria situation is ridiculous, teachers only allow the kids to eat lunch for 15 minutes, not reasonable. This school needs to focus on the problems they got at hand rather than embarking on new ventures.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2012

Very disappointed with the new leadership at the school. Principal blows concerns off, fails to get back to parents and overall seems annoyed if she doesnt get her way. Current teachers need to be paid more and new teachers need to be selected at a higher standard. Overall I like the way the school is headed, but it still needs a LOT of work. Contemplating removing my child if this next year doesnt improve.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2012

I agree with the poster on June 9. The school needs to improve their dicipline standards. I believe they need to make rules and follow those for each student. Principal is new to the school, but is trying her best. I believe that is a good thing. There has been many changes with teachers for the up coming school year. I hope that will be for the good. Also, my children like it at GVA and that is the deciding factor that keeps me there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2012

GVA has positives and negatives, like any school, and I don't expect perfection. The pros: smaller class sizes, emphasis on physical education, Spanish, music class, art class, and caring teachers. I also like that they don't send the younger grades home with huge homework packets every week. Also, they try to tailor learning to the individual student. For instance, my son just finished up 1st grade but he was reading at a 5th grade level, so they pulled him out of class every week to join in a special reading group for students that were reading at a higher level than their classmates. Cons: Low API test scores, no school nurse on site, no school counselor on site, discipline is too lax, and, although this may seem trivial, I really hate that they picked khaki for the uniforms - - they stain SO easily. For our family, the good outweighs the bad with this school. I am hopeful that the things I have concerns about will change and get better as time goes on. My son certainly likes his school, and that goes a long way for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2012

They say they care about our kids but actions speak louder then words and the special ed dept is a joke. They couldn't help a child in need if they tried it's all politics & money at this school. Kids come first what a joke! Their are a few great teachers but they all leave because there not paid what there owed and aren't aloud to help the kids the way they need it. The state needs to shut this school down! It's damaging these kids........Rating F
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

770

Change from
2012 to 2013

-21

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

770

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-21

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
34%

2010

 
 
50%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
37%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
42%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
17%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students53%
Females62%
Males40%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only51%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate45%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students46%
Females46%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)53%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only46%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate27%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Females45%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate20%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)39%
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Females60%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)66%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females63%
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate44%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)54%
Parent education - college graduate66%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students65%
Females66%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)54%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students55%
Females63%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate27%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)53%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students49%
Females51%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability49%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate33%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)39%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students48%
Females48%
Males49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate33%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students59%
Females62%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino44%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Non-economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)40%
Parent education - college graduate52%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females62%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino44%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)44%
Parent education - college graduate48%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students56%
Females57%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students65%
Females52%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females65%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students52%
Females61%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students31%
Females30%
Males32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino29%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)21%
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students56%
Females47%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 66% 26%
Hispanic 26% 52%
Two or more races 4% 3%
Black 2% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 11%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 51%N/A48%
Male 49%N/A51%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3200 Tully Road
Modesto, CA 95350
Website: Click here
Phone: (209) 576-2283

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT