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GreatSchools Rating

Daves Avenue Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 16 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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31 reviews of this school


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Posted July 8, 2014

When I first saw all the negative reviews, I was horrified. However, after a year at Daves, I can say that many of the issues raised are things of the past. Some reviews have been written before the new Principal took over. Others are by parents who haven t seen change come fast enough. However, we must understand that Public Schools are like the Titanic, they can t turn around in a jiffy. The good news is that Daves has seen the iceberg and has already changed course. And the shift to Common Core is slowly bringing about rigorous academic standards. To summarise what Daves has to its credit a)Excellent facilities and infrastructure. b)Highly involved and supportive parent community. c)Excellent communication with parents. d)Dedicated and hardworking teachers. e)Most important, a visionary Principal who has been quietly bringing about far reaching changes. There is a growing feeling that things have changed for the better! After our initial worries, we have enjoyed our year at Daves. My child loves the school, and we now feel confident that it is back on the path to excellence.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2014

Wow....I know everyone has an opinion and perspective based on personal experience, but I am shocked and saddened by some of the horrible comments some of the previous reviewers wrote. Calling parent volunteers "trophy wife wanabees" is just petty name calling. Is that what we're teaching our children? I work full time and also volunteer . Not to advance my social standing (seriously, who would have time for that?!?). I know how much time & dedication parent volunteers give to ensure an amazing place for their children to receive an education. The H&SC is constantly trying to make it easier to raise money without overwhelming parents. Their goal is to try to provide these students with the advantages of a private school education without paying 30k per year. Does anyone actually think they are fundraising because they have nothing better to do or that they want to take over the school? I won't spend any further energy on the negativity of a few and say instead that I am extremely grateful for a caring, dedicated staff who are committed to our children, incredible parent involvement and an unbelievable community. We are very fortunate indeed to be a part of Daves!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 26, 2013

Daves Avenue has the potential to be a great school. It's got the cash and resources from the wealthy parents of its student body. It has a strong community of parent volunteers as well, though many are trophy wife wannabes -- think "Real Housewives of Orange County" -- looking to advance their social standing rather than improve Daves' quality of education. And therein lies the problem: scholastically, Daves is weak, but many parents don't seem to care. In fact, some are delighted there is no homework, citing studies suggesting homework has no benefit for elementary school kids. Yeah, right. Tell that to the parents of middle school students spending hours of their free time getting tutored in math and language arts. It's shameful for such an affluent area in Silicon Valley. If the parents don't care, the teachers will coast and so will the principal. The ones who get hurt are the children, our kids, who we hope will move on to college and get good jobs. But that's not going to happen for our kids if we raise them on this "let's play golf " attitude. Daves, unfortunately, is fostering this attitude by its hands-off approach to academics. It's got to step up its game.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2013

Beautiful facility, great after school activities, latest technology (iPad minis for younger grades), quality field trips, & lots of parent volunteers. New principal is in his second year. So far he seems to be a big improvement over the last principal. Many wonderful teachers, some not so great. Not sure if all of the staff have read their mission statement: "We believe that quality teaching is the greatest predictor of student success." So why are we behind other schools? I was not a fan of old principal, but it is easy to point the finger at someone no longer there. I hope we don't have to wait too long for new principal to figure it out. Another mission statement "We believe in every child s capacity to learn" especially if your family is one of the LG / Monte Sereno elite (H&SC or BIG $$ donors). I'm grateful for HS&C time and school would not be what it is w/o affluent community but not everyone is treated equally. I agree with previous review that there are families with an "I'm entitled" attitude. This does not lend itself to a positive & collaborative environment. Anyone notice string of 5 star reviews on 8-26 that all sound like same person wrote them?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2013

When parents complain about the 325/- it is NOT about the money. Rather a) Parents are totally put off by the RUDE, arm twisting tactics of the HSC. b) Parents are asking, why all this fund raising if the academic results are only declining? Never forget that the activities the HSC/LGEF fund are PERIPHERAL. Most of the funding still comes from the state. I have stopped reading the Wednesday wave, it is all about fundraisers and social activities, very little about education!!! READS LIKE A COUNTRY CLUB NEWSLETTER! HSC also floods us with emails about these, making us miss the important, academic stuff. We spend more time in meeting fundraiser deadlines than in getting homework done. At this rate my child will end up with an A in fundraising and an F in academics. I feel this is the main reason why the API scores are pathetic, especially compared to the schools around, like the Campbell Union ones. I am not writing this to be mean and nasty, but in the hope that it will lead to CHANGE. Daves has an EXCELLENT principal and GREAT teachers. But it looks like there has been an HSC takeover of the school. And that could be triggering all these negative reviews.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2013

You can give up the idea that the new principal cares about your child. And this attitude trickles down to how the school operates, where priorities are, and level of expectation for teachers's accountability. The school is beautiful and resourceful because of the community it is in. Home & School Club fees going up to $325 per child while the academic result is the worst among Los Gatos elementary schools. Your child will likely do better if: - You volunteer a lot and build up warm relationship with teachers. So moms, give up your career. And what a way to inspire your daughters. - Daily check your child's school work and get your child make up missing assignments. It is your child's or your fault! - Your child having problem to focus? Take the advice for medication! - Hiring a Daves teacher to be your child's private tutor? Why not. There is no such thing as conflict of interest. It would be the best if your child is placed in this tutor's class. Read the reviews and judge for yourself because every families has different situations. Just be prepared for what you need to do make Daves experience a very positive one for child and your family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2013

Like any school, a school is as good as it's teachers, principal, parents and children who are a part of it. Most part parents are involved but sometimes it feels like most of the work is done by a select few but that is to be expected in this affluent area where two parents work. Some parents and children have a sense of entitlement, some teachers do too. This school is located in a district that has more money than most districts, teachers are paid well with great benefits, beautiful buildings, technology and every Wed is a half day for teachers to do what teachers use to do after school. All the district elementary schools share the great resources. There is big pressure to donate money both to district Ed fund and your own school. This school has had fair share of problems on heels of getting rid of a non-productive principal, reading problems, math problems, another district change in math, teachers in the past needed gift cards as incentives to say, help in carpool lane AM/PM. Some parents just don't realize the magnitude of deficiency until much later when it's too late and when they do they never give feedback for fear of retaliation. Not 1st choice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2013

Fantastic school with teacher and administration that truly cares. The families are so involved and true advocates of the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2013

Others should know Daves is a beautiful school, a hand full of good teachers and a greater bunch of not so great. I have three children at the school and a stepson who moved on to Fisher and now LGHS this fall. He required tutors to and supplemental work for the spotty education he received here. For my three children here, it's hit or miss depending on the teacher and I spend 25k a year making sure they do not fall behind. I really think this school could improve if they replace most of the teachers. One horrible teacher is gone but their are others who could use some development. For reference I am a current parent and a past parent to a stepson.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2013

Dave's Avenue is a wonderful school. It is well organized and has a staff of very committed and enthusiastic teachers. I have found that the teachers are committed to their classrooms as well as to their professional growth and development. I think it's wonderful to hear the teachers talk about classes they take and how they are applying their continual learning into the classroom. The parent community is exceptional, as well. There is no limit to the parent volunteers and support from this community. It's a great school to have my children go each day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

Daves Avenue Elementary is top notch. The teachers have been super caring and on top of it. Our kids are thriving here among other great kids and an involved parent community. I think the new principle, Kitt Bragg, has been a huge asset to the school and really cares about the 'whole' student including academics and beyond.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

My daughter attended 4th and 5th grade at Daves in the early 2000's. It was a good experience for her, but 5th grade was stellar. Her teacher was Ms Goie (now Ms KIngsford?). She was an enthusiastic teacher who inspired her students. My daughter got her first set of straight As with her, in part because she loved her class and wanted to impress her. I can't speak to other issues that have been noted and seem to be a more recent phenomenon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

We are loving the experience as parents at Daves Avenue Elementary. Our son couldn't be more stoked and excited to do his school work. His teacher is a wonderful communicator, and after teaching for over 30 years you can see her love of career choice and committment to the kids in everything she does. New principal seems great. Facility is beautiful. Many parents have commented how they like the secure "tucked in" neighborhood location vs. Blossom Hill and Van Meter on very busy streets.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

Our kids are doing excellent at Daves. We have the teacher support that works well for both of our children. They are thriving and growing as students and individuals.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

After having my 1 child attend & graduate from Blossom Hill & my 3 attend Daves Ave. I can say I have a good feel for 2 of the schools in Los Gatos. Both schools were fantastic but I have to say Daves Ave felt more like a private school, less cliquey & the families more down to earth. We have had some of the most amazing teachers who really care & worked with each of my kids individual needs. To say a child should be reading by 6 or 7 is putting all children in one category. Many european schools don't start to teach their children to read until 6 or 7. We scores higher in our children's younger years, but other countries pass us up by leaps and bounds in their teens. We put way too much pressure on them at such a young age that we are burning our kids out. The teachers at Daves were caring and a few were down right amazing... going above and beyond to help the ones that struggle. My kids loved going to school at Daves and were given a passion for learning. They have succeeded greatly at Fisher and LG High school so they must be learning something!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2013

I just read the previous review, and I have to say I have a hard time believing it was written by a concerned parent. My kids actually go to this school, and the standards there are very low. There are kids in first grade who DO NOT know the alphabet! Some can't even count to 10. This is shameful. Sure, there are some kids who can read in first grade, but that is, believe it or not concerned parent, pretty average for this age group. Yes, you read that right. They should be reading by the time they're 6 or 7, and we're not talking Shakespeare or the Magna Carta. Overall, the school's STAR test results are sharply LOWER from last year, especially in 2nd grade, and I'm sure that will be reflected in the API score, due out in October. In the higher grades, the pace is particularly slow, and many parents wind up spending thousands on supplementing. As for the community, if you're not traipsing the campus in $200 tights or driving a Lexus SUV to and from pilates classes at the Courtside Club, you're considered a loser, unworthy of their time. If you're looking to move into the area, I'd recommend looking for a place near Blossom Hill Elementary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2013

I have to say that I'm shocked to see some of the negative comments about Daves Ave. Elementary. I am a Daves Ave. parent, and I have taught at other public schools in various parts of the south bay, and this school shines! We have a warm and caring community, that supports a well-rounded education. Perhaps some parents around Los Gatos or Monte Sereno have unrealistic expectations about public school education. I loved that when my child was in kindergarten, she had fun and learned about many things. No, she wasn't reading at 8th grade level when she entered 1st grade, but kindergarten was a very positive experience for her. That is key in getting students engaged in school. I think the staff and teachers are great. Sure there may be a teacher that a parent doesn't get along with (happens in EVERY school), but the school should not suffer with poor reviews. It is most likely a union/district issue. I love our little school, and I'm proud to send my children there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2013

The fact that this school is in such a highly touted school district makes its mediocrity all the more galling. We moved from another state, where my daughter had done K and first grade. She has been reading chapter books since she was four, is very smart and loves to learn. As a second grader, she came home with things to work on that she had covered in kindergarten -- she regressed. Uncharacteristically, she took little pride in her work, and when I pointed out that a word may not be spelt correctly, she would shrug and say that it was okay because the teachers did not care! There was never homework. It is completely lacking in any rigor, and the teachers and the principal essentially blew me off with a smile, assurances and absolutely no follow up. Vapid, vacuous, etc. It is so bad, that I feel that I have to put her in a private school despite philosophical problems with private education. Don't be fooled by the nice campus and all the fancy cars, this is a really low par school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 7, 2011

As the last reviewer said, " It takes a supportive parent to make a good experience for a child great. " Well, I am a 100% supportive parent and sometimes that is not enough when your teacher is not properly providing positive reinforcement and help. My son who couldn't wait to come home and do his homework last year turned into an angry boy who would get upset any time I mentioned homework. It turns out his teacher in 2nd grade is yelling at the children and even told them to "shut up". I have witnessed the yelling and frustration myself on days I help out. At this point the year is completely overshadowing the wonderful 1st and Kindergarten teacher experiences that we had. I believe this school is beautiful and most of the teachers are fantastic. This two star is for the lack of response to getting a bad apple out of the bunch.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 23, 2011

Reading the last three reviews, it seems possible all are absolutely true. The most recent post, 11/11, states the teacher "everybody seems to be talking about" did a good job for her kids, who have since moved on to high school. That means the perspective is 6-9 yrs old. The two 8/11 posts are based on last year. Good teachers become bad teachers. Young teachers become old teachers. There has been a significant decline in the education delivered in recent years, friends commenting their younger one not getting the same as their older ones did just a few years ago. Even with the same teacher. The moral of the teachers seems to decline, and a few of the best ones have left. So far this year is better than last, but we're considering private school as we watch our kids get bored and fall behind, saying nothing is hard and material is covered very slowly. The principal wants to make is a no-stress school, but the stress will come when these parents and children realize they lost 3 yrs of educational progress compared to their peers at the other public schools, and maybe more when compared to private. No homework, no study skills. How is that going to work in middle school?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

903

Change from
2012 to 2013

-14

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

903

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-14

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
74%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females80%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students84%
Females83%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females77%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females77%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females84%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Females68%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate72%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females83%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females79%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asian83%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students93%
Females90%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 74% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 11%
Hispanic 8% 52%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Black 1% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 4%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Kit Bragg
Fax number
  • (408) 395-6314

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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17770 Daves Avenue
Monte Sereno, CA 95030
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 335-2200

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