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GreatSchools Rating

La Mesa Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 6 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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53 reviews of this school


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Posted September 3, 2014

This schools reputation is not deserved. There is a large population of military children that stay for a short time and boost the school's test scores. The higher scores are consistent year to year as every year there are new students that came from better schools. Local parents that value their children's education transfer their children to this school expecting great things. Almost immediately it is obvious the high test scores and good reputation are fluff. The class sizes are large. The teachers are hit or miss. Lunch time is a negative experience due to poor time management, overcrowding, and warnings that recess will be taken away. Their funding has been cut. They do not have a school nurse. Communication is poor. Orientation was three weeks into the school year and children were not allowed to attend. This school is right in the middle of a military neighborhood. Military.... That means they do not have grandparents that live nearby to watch the kids. The school completely ignores the needs of the military and local community. Sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2014

An open house where children are not welcome. That should tell you a lot about this pretentious, pedantic school. The first and only communication from the school at the start of the 2014-2015 year was a recorded phone call reminding parents that school started at 8am the following day. No class lists were posted until the morning school began. No chance to meet the teachers or look around the school grounds. THREE WEEKS after school started, they scheduled a back to school night for parents to meet their student's teacher and learn about classroom policies. But every flyer, recorded phone call, and note about it make it clear that the night is for parents only and children are not welcome. With a child in 4th, one in kindergarten, and a preschooler at home, we chose to skip it. The 1st parent teacher conferences are scheduled for one week after this back to school open house. The teachers are pedantic and overworked. A math sheet without a single problem wrong came home marked with a 0% and a giant F because apparently a correct answer doesn't count unless commas are in place. Who cares if the problems are solved correctly? NOT THE 4TH GRADE STAFF.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2014

We moved into La Mesa for this school and have been sorely disappointed. Classes are huge (28-31) with one teacher. You will notice the school's issues as soon as you speak with the front office staff...every interaction was with rude ladies who made us feel like an inconvenience. Getting time with a teacher is next to impossible as is trying to communicate with them. The overall attitude is to get the kids through and if you are a parent raising issues you are ignored. There is a high turn over of students due to the military population being here for very short periods of time. Overall I do not at all recommend La Mesa and wish we had been warned before moving in the neighborhood for this school. stints. Overall the issues we expeetienced were
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2014

My daughter had a very positive experience at La Mesa for 4th and half of 5th grade due to two superb teachers. Despite large class sizes (over 30 kids) and varying levels of academic background among students, these teachers managed to challenge all children appropriately. The teachers were caring and respectful and provided opportunities for students to do special projects (mission project, book reports, historical and biographical research, dioramas). One of the most exciting opportunities for 5th graders is the week long overnight trip to science camp in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The science lab program is a hidden gem of La Mesa. The instrument program was a big disappointment, starting in 5th grade and being very weak. The art program thrived due to parent volunteers helping out with the Art Docent program. The PTA does an amazing job trying to recruit volunteers to participate in fundraisers that pull in large amounts of the school's budget (e.g., the At&t Pro-AM). However, communication was lacking, and volunteers pleas were often last minute. This school deserves kudos for evolving in the face of constant student turnover.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2014

The principal should keep in mind that she is no longer a queen bee she used to be and that type of Californian valley girls that come out of her very often is just appalling. At her age and her level she should have gone around other States to see how well behaved educated ladies act and talk. Grow up for crying out loud!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2014

We have been here for over 2 years. If you get a good teacher that cares about education then your ok. However I feel that a lot of the teacher have the mentality that they are kids and they should spend the day playing. I've been told that most teacher plan the curriculum for the day while the kids are on the playground, or at lunch. I have a second grader and they sometimes go all day without writing a sentence. How is that possible? They are on the playground or doing artwork more then they are in the classroom doing work. I'm very concerned that my kids will behind when we move from here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2013

It is a wonderful school with its teachers and staff personnel . My son is so happy with being a student of this school. Thanks
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

La mesa is wonderful. I am very happy with my daughter's kindergarten teacher. The parent involvement is also incredible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2013

The school as well as the teachers and staff are wonderful. The teachers are willing top work with you.The PTA is great. So you have music, art, science lab and PE unlike most of the county. The PTA raises the money so that these extras go to our students. I recommend you get involved. So that LME can keep them. We were there 2 1/2 years and really enjoyed the time at LME. Class sizes are normal for CA and the academics are the best in the county. If your moving to NPS and are going to be in La Mesa Village LME is a great school!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2013

La Mesa is just an overcrowded school, so much so that I'm not even sure if my daughter's teacher really knew her academic shortfalls or even her name. It was not academically challenging or stimulating enough; for the first time my daughter started vocally expressing how she disliked school, that it was boring, and not fun. We pulled her out and moved her to Stevenson. Big Big Big Difference!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

This school is one of the reasons we moved out of La Mesa housing. Teachers are not responsive. The administration supports failing teachers. After moving to PG, my two children really started learning more which highlighted the ineffectiveness of this school. The kids to far more schoolwork in extensive homework packages than they do in class. This is the teachers way of pushing their responsibilities to teach off on the parents. Do not be fooled, this is not a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2011

The best school in the Monterey District. The Principal gets bad reviews, but she works hards and cares for both the teachers and students. Overall the teachers are great, one of my son's teachers is the best I have ever seen. Hate we will be moving soon. There are alot of issues with funding, but because of large amount of retired and transient population, it is very hard to get funding for the schools in this district. Class size is large, but we moved from one the best school districts in VA, and it was not much better. For public schools to work, there needs to be involvement from the community and this schoold does well with what available. I will be happy if our next school is this good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2010

When you compare La Mesa to the surrounding public schools, it is, quite simply above average... however, if you compare it with the education that you would like your child to have, it falls woefully short. Our son attended La Mesa for kindergarten in 2008-2009 and had a wonderful experience (19 students in his class, superb teacher, PE, art, etc). At the start of his first grade year, however, his class had 36 kids. One teacher... 36 kids... Within a couple of weeks, our child didn't want to go to school anymore... it was "too crazy" as he put it. We volunteered 4-8 hours every week for a month to see what was happening in the classroom -- sheer and utter chaos. During the fall break, we tightened up our financial belt and moved our child to Junipero Serra School in Carmel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 11, 2010

This school is a joke. It is filthy, the cafeteria is run by one lady who heats up the pre-packaged meals and also works the cash register. The meals are very unhealthy. While some of the teachers have great intentions, they lack the funding, supplies and support from the school to accomplish all they want/need to accomplish. Our daughters teacher used to send home weekly newsletters loaded with typos! The only reason this school does not have a lower overall score is because parents are forced to make up at home for what their children get in class. My wife constantly used to say: "With all the homework our daughter brings home, I wonder if they do anything at all in class during the day besides take numerous recesses?" We moved to Carmel Valley after six months just to get our daughter into a better school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2010

We are ending our 2nd year here at La Mesa. My main complaints about the school regard the overall district's/state's inability to provide a curriculum that challenges my student, too many students per class (which is becoming a trend in CA), and the absence or under-representation of many positions that I feel are necessary in any school. These positions include a school counselor, school nurse, vice principal, GATE instruction, and full-time enrichment programs, not unlike most public schools in this state. What makes this school great is the number of parents who volunteer. We also have a lot of foreign students which makes for unique learning opportunities about others' cultures. The faculty and staff make the most out of their resources and the PTA is generally well-supported. Overall a good choice for this area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2010

This school is ridiculous! The teachers do not pay attention to the student...My daughters first report card conference was the first time her teachers had ever seen any of her class work! They also trust 10 and 11yr old students to grade their own papers or have the student next to them grade them, this seems like a good idea except the teacher don't collect the work to make sure they are done correctly therefore many students are failing when the parents bring it to the attention of the teachers. Its sad to say but I wish my child was never enrolled in this school and by the time first report cards came home the school year was almost over. When its 'benchmark' test time the teachers cram the students with the info they need just to pass and keep scores up! Do not put your child here
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2010

La Mesa Has wonderful teachers but that is where it ends. The PTA works hard to provide art, music, pe and computers. There is a lot of parent but as in most places it is the same few people every time. The PTA board is not full and no one is willing to step up. There might not be a PTA next year so no art, music, pe or computers! As for the Principal all one needs to do is listen to kids or parents outside to know how they feel. The superintendent for the district is making even more drastic changes that will hurt this school even more. The building is out of date and in disrepair in many areas. There is garbage all over the school and it is left there until it blows away or a parent picks it up. Put your child somewhere else!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2010

La Mesa Elementary has been a very large military population due to DLI and NPS. It has been good learning environment for my children. As mentioned by others, this school benefits from active participation of the community that it serves. Parental involvement has been discouraged though during the current school year due to a change in one of the administration positions, which has led to declining morale (voiced by both parents and teachers). This school however, has held its place as one of if not the best in MPUSD. Just make sure that you insert yourself and stay on top of your child's academic progress.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2009

La Mesa is a public school, run like a private school. The teachers are excellent. I've never met a harder working group of teachers. Stay away from the front office, if you can. They are rude, and will make you mad. The principal is new, and has never been a principal before. But, if you want the best education possible for your child, La Mesa school is the best place to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2009

We squeezed into a small house here so that our child could go to LaMesa. Looking back, we may have lived in Carmel or PG. This is the only good school in a failing district, which is dealing with severe budget cuts that put a huge strain on the schools. Next year we hear that there will be at least 30 kids/class (even K-3). We may or may not have art, music, PE, and computer (all funded by the PTA).We had a very rough start this year (my kid had three teachers in three months), but things are better now. I had problems with the principal, but now feel that she is doing a good job overall. Teachers are excellent and are doing the best they can given the cuts. Based on next year's outlook, we are moving our child to a private school at Christmas, before things get worse.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

865

Change from
2012 to 2013

+1

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

865

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+1

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
66%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
73%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Females79%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian50%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner43%
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students79%
Females79%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian58%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learner57%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females57%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate54%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females68%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learner46%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students75%
Females79%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disability25%
Students with no reported disability85%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate78%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students77%
Females74%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disability45%
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner35%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate78%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females62%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disability17%
Students with no reported disability74%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate62%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate78%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students60%
Females69%
Males52%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disability15%
Students with no reported disability76%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate74%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students75%
Females74%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner31%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 60%
Hispanic 18%
Asian 9%
Black 5%
Two or more races 5%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 19%N/AN/A
English language learners 24%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 9%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Patsy Oxford
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Fax number
  • (831) 649-3942
School leaders can update this information here.

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1 La Mesa Way
Monterey, CA 93940
Phone: (831) 649-1872

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