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GreatSchools Rating

Mary Fay Pendleton Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 802 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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47 reviews of this school


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Posted March 30, 2014

My son attended kindergarten at this school. I've been told by his teacher that he is the youngest of the class, he can't focus, can't finish his work on time compare to other students. She mentioned because he is youngest of all he'll always be at the bottom of the class. Turned out my son is in the gifted program. I'm so glad I moved him to a much better school. Mary Fay by far is the worse school I've ever seen.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2014

When we first moved to Camp Pendleton we heard so many good things about Mary Fay. My child has been there for 3 years now and each year it has become worse. The communication between parents and the school is horrible. My daughter is in the new middle school that Mary Fay tried to build and I finally have had enough. We are relocating her to another school. The school is over crowded and there is a sense of a clique among the PTA. The website says a class size is 20 which is a horrible lie a regular class size is no LESS than 35. The school does have the potential to be a whole lot better but as of right now, our kids deserve a lot better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2014

Run!! Your child is not in good hands at this school!!! This is school has so many hidden problems that no one see until after their child is in rolled in it. Cliques among Admin., staff, PTSA (they are really BAD) and volunteers. Being bullied is not addressed they way the school say it will be. They went to this common core learning and now the school is failing from what the state says. That 8 out of 10 is a lie because most of the kids tested in the school are no longer there the next year. Your child could go into the school getting great test scores and then get to MFP and their score will come back failing.Class rooms are over crowed and most teachers have to many kids in their class to really give the children in their class the right teaching they need. If your child needs anything special to help them learn until you demand the help the school could care less about what they may need. I only have the next few months left at this school because we move in July but my child has been here three years and in that time I have learned that if you live in the areas that go to this school just RUN!! DONT SUBJECT YOUR CHILD TO THIS SCHOOL AND THE PEOPLE WHO RUN IT !!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2013

Not very good.....Mr. Dominguez seems very disorganized . My younger child was in a class of 34 and my older child had 29 in his class. The one bright spot was Mr. Corica (sixth grade teacher) who was transfered out by the principal. I have one more year before we move and I might just get the heck out of dodge.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

This is my son's third year at this school and I have nothing but good things to say about it! The new administration is wonderful and is getting the school organized and implmenting new programs. The teachers are amazing and work well to provide the best education for our students. One teacher was even nominated and is one of the top ten finalists for Teacher of the Year for San Diego county!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2012

Our daughter attended Kindergarten here and we disenrolled her after one month. There were 32 children in the kindergarten classroom with one teacher and NO aide. It was so over crowded that some kids sat on the floor and some sat in chairs during group work. Even though we liked her teacher, it was not a good environment for learning and very slow at making progress. We discussed our concern with the Principal (he's new this year) but there was nothing he could do about it. All of the kindergarten classes were way over crowded and averaging 31-35 students with no aides to help the teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2012

My son attended Kindergarten for the first time this year. He was born in September, just in the middle of their cut out. I was informed by his teacher that he isn't doing good. He is gonna be at the bottom no matter what, because he is the youngest and immature. When I talked to her and try to help all I got was I should move my son down to preppie class. What kind of teacher would you your kid is stupid? Not to mention the first day of school my son was left outside in front of their little office when he supposted to ride the bus home. No staff or his teacher would help and assist him to the bus. Second day he was in the wrong bus. Can you imagine waiting for your kid to get home, but he isn't there? I talked the K leader, and principle assistant, and his teacher. They all made it sound like it is my son responsibility to remember which bus to catch on the second day of school. His teacher doesn't seem passion about making kids being the best they can be. She is good at nothing much she can do to help, she seems overwhelmed by 32 kids in her class. I'm miserable and fear for my son. I will pull him out of this school. Very bad school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2012

This is my first year at this school and I have heard nothing but great things about it. I have a VERY different opinion. I have never seen a more disorganized school. There is a lack of communication between parents and the school. They give out important info at the last minute. They have marked my child absent when I put her on the bus leaving me scared and wondering if something happened to her between the bus and her class. They have also not put her on the bus and again leaving me wondering what on earth has happened to my child. This is a military base, this school needs to clearly get its act together and PRONTO!! All together making me feel my children aren't safe there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2012

I have been very happy with Mary Fay's kindergarten program. By the end of the year my son was proficient in first grade sight words & even writing sentences. I couldn't be happier with his kindergarten teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2011

This school has become so overcrowded! Actually It was already overcrowded last year, so what did they decide to do? They added an 8th grade this September to make the situation even worse. Combine that with the ever-shrinking budget, poor supervision (especially on the playground at recess) and an absent administration and then you may start to get an accurate picture of what's going on there. I can also tell you from first hand experience, if you have a gifted child then you will want to steer clear of this school. Their so-called "GATE" program exists in name only. I've been hearing for two years now how they are just about to start implementing it after the next break.. It's pretty sad considering how the needs of our gifted children... Our potential bright stars of the future.. are simply being over-looked. They truly have "extra" needs, and should be treated the same as any other "extra needs" group.. They definitely deserve better then an after school book club to meet those needs, that's for sure. One thing I can say for this school, is thank God for all the parent participation/volunteering!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2011

We were part of MFP for three years (k-3) and loved it! The teachers are awesome, they really put their heart on the kids. I agree that parent involvement is crucial at MFP but I think that is true at any school. Because the great majority of the kids come from military families, its great for kids and parents as well to know you are in the same boat. Kids understand that they are not the only ones who move every two-three years. True, the school will be great with more programs to offer but I was really satisfied how teachers work with what they have and get creative, as well as some very amazing volunteers. Thank you MFP we'll miss you!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2011

This school is held together by great teachers and VERY involved parents. I have never seen any complaints gain traction with the administration. I think they know you live on base and have to pay for private school to go anywhere else. I volunteer at the school and walk away from the office every time with a bad taste in my mouth. Class sizes are huge and parent daily involvement is a must! I know many families on base that pulled their kids out of MFP and suggested we do the same. We lucked out with an incredible teacher and lots of parents volunteering in her class. We will not be returning next year! If you live on base and have to go to MFP be prepared to spend a lot of time at the school to ensure your child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

I went to Mary Fay school but I did NOT like it there. Some of my teachers there were great but I did not like the way it works. I didn't like it there I strongly disliked it.


Posted March 7, 2011

My children have been at Mary Fay four years(covering K through 5th grade) and our experience has been nothing but positive. The teachers that my kids have had are the best! They truly care about their students. Considering the budget cuts to education, I have seen little impact in the classroom. The parental involvement and support helps fill in those gaps. Unfortunately, it's time to move on and we will miss Mary Fay very much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2011

I went here for 4th and 5th grade it was AMAZING!! One of the best schooling experences i have ever had very great academic opertunities but hopefuly then will have music in the school again I <3 Mary Fay!!!


Posted January 20, 2011

To the teacher that posted she would love to hear our concerns as parents...I tried, numerous times and the head teacher did not take me seriously....the safety of the kids at this school is not 110% maybe a 40%. They never seem to know where my daughter is. I could take her out of the school lunch room and know one would be the wiser until it was too late. I am very saddened that the office staff barely even acknowledges you when you walk in the door, let alone check your id to make sure you are not some crazed person. With the way the world is today, this school needs to step up their security for the safety of our children. Now, I do love the teachers that my child has had. They have been wonderful!! And they are very helpful with deployed parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2010

Coming from Oak Park, IL in which the schools system is considered one of the best of the best in Illinois, Mary Fay Pendleton has accomplished many milestones with my child. Not to mention the great support for children of deployed parents. I love this school and am proud to have my son in an institution that has done great things for him academically, socially, and physically. Great Job Mary Fay your the BEST!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2010

My daughter has attended Mary Fay Pendleton Elementary School for the past two years and we are going into our third happy year here in the Fall. We have been able to experience both the past and the current principals with great expectations and equally great results. In fact, the new principal is leaps and bounds ahead of her replacement when it comes to improving the school's programs and already successful test scores. The majority of the administration is exemplary in their devotion to the students. The PTA is also extremely dedicated in making sure that the school gets the necessary funding to give the children field trips and assemblies that would otherwise be nonexistent due to state budget cuts. The school is also fortunate enough to have an amazing volunteer basis made up of parents and willing Marines. I have truely never been happier with a school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2010

Its not fair for that parent to speak for 'all parents' I am a parent of two students that attend MFP and do not feel the same. My oldest child is in the 6th grade and will be attend MFP 7th grade.My child has been a student at MFP since Kindergarten. I love this school. I don't know of any parents that have 'pulled their children out of MFP' and if so it would be because the family may have orders to PCS. As for programs being removed that is false. Programs have been added to help children succeed academically. I can see first hand what goes on because I am there everyday. I attend open houses/ back to school nights, attend the mother/ son dance and I am a PTA member. I am able to do all those things while being employed. April 29 post was false.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2010

Wow, I'm so sorry to read the previous review. I have worked at MFP for a long time and would love to talk to this person personally. If parents have concerns, we would certainly welcome the chance to talk to them and try to make things right. This is a phenomenal staff and the new principal has introduced lots of new programs to enhance academics.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

887

Change from
2012 to 2013

+14

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

9 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

887

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+14

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

116 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
43%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
69%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
78%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

12 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females73%
Males73%
African American53%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino71%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate55%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students88%
Females88%
Males87%
African American82%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged78%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate80%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)86%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females52%
Males60%
African American50%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)51%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students76%
Females75%
Males77%
African American92%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disability42%
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females90%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged78%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate87%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females96%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino79%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged96%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate93%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)84%
Parent education - college graduate97%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females67%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)62%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students76%
Females73%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)77%
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students67%
Females62%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged68%
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate43%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Females68%
Males74%
African American82%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate75%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate72%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Females65%
Males72%
African American64%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate67%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females91%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students84%
Females89%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students76%
Females76%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)93%
Parent education - college graduate46%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females71%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students33%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students72%
Females71%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students84%
Females79%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 44%
Hispanic 30%
Black 12%
Two or more races 9%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Asian 0%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 38%N/AN/A
English language learners 4%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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School basics

School start time
  • 7:50 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
School Leader's name
  • Chad McGough
Fax number
  • (760) 385-4254

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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110 Marine Drive
Oceanside, CA 92058
Website: Click here
Phone: (760) 731-4050

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