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GreatSchools Rating

Edison Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 766 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 6 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 8 ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted October 12, 2014

My daughter has been at Edison since Kindergarten and will graduate from 8th grade this year. She has loved her years here and so have I. Nervous about the GATE program and even the middle school years, I'm happy to say, my daughter is super smart and will be totally ready for high school next year. I've loved the great relationship she has had with her teachers and their continued encourement. I'm so thankful for all Edison has given to my daughter's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2014

Edison Academy is a great place for your student. I had my kid there for 7th and 8th grade so when I read this last post I had to speak up for our terrific teachers and for our terrific parent volunteers! I also have a kid in primary and yes the school is a bit overcrowded but it is a small price to pay for the rewards and academic success those teachers have achieved with the students .Amazing, amazing teachers! I also want to mention that I know the lady with the purple hair because she worked in kindergarten with my kids class and she is a pretty terrific lady. I was surprised to see her serving at the ceremony because believe it or not her kid was being promoted and there she was! Helping when she could have just been a guest like the rest of us. People help where they can and she helps a lot at our school. So what if she did not attend PFO meetings? A lot of us don't or can't! That school is full of parent volunteers who do many different things, My kids are big fans of the lady with the purple hair and so am I. That school should count her as one of it's biggest blessings, the students love her! Edison Acadrmy is the best school to put your kids in! Bet on it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2014

I and several other families took our jr. high kids out of Edison. The school is over crowded and the 7/8 grade teachers are over worked. They cannot focus on the kids because they have too many responsibilities outside the classroom, from substituting as principal to trainings and meetings and even coaching. Initially we thought it would be a great choice because with less students the teachers would work harder for our kids but the opposite happened. Also we noticed that the PFO did not get much parent support and we all worked hard for those kids. Especially the eigth graders by raising money to help pay for their district trip and their promotion ceremony. PFO worked really hard and we raised a lot of money but we were not included in the events and some of us found out by parents who were there that the one mom with the purple hair was at the ceremony serving families and taking the glory but yet we never saw her once at our meetings or even lift a finger to help us raise money but yet she had no problem getting the attention.(former PTA) If you are thinking of Edison as a choice for your middle school. think again, this school is over sold!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2014

Standing in line this morning, talking with several other parents from other district schools, while signing our 8th graders up for a district trip.... everyone was comparing notes about their kids and asking eachother what school their kid attended. When I said Edison, and finished explaining about the junior high program, several of the parents commented that they had no idea where the school was, and didn't know it was a K-8th school. I told them that the only drawback was that it's a relatively small campus, with a huge student population (4 year olds all the way to 14 year olds - many of them taller than the staff), but all works out well.... with a dedicated staff and plenty of elbow grease from the involved parents. Another lady interrupts and says, "well, it's no wonder it's crowded... have you seen the schools scores? Everyone wants in there! " - I'm not gonna lie.... I honestly didn't know our scores (but was pretty sure we ranked good in comparison to the other schools), and I was more than happy to feel a little proud. Go Edison!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2014

Tonight Edison had its first talent show and I must say I am so impressed. Not only are our students given a first class education but also the oppurtunity to express their creative side. I love our school!!!! Christina Garcia Proud Edison Parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2014

Having a closed campus isn't something new, we are just one of the last schools to do it. Now our kids will be receiving a quality education and be a little safer. Any problems we had in the past were addressed by the staff. We are very happy with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 23, 2012

I have read all of the reviews, as well as some that are no longer on here before I left for the holiday, and I have to say how sad all of the negativity is on here. I know that people do not always see eye to eye but I think people lose sight of what is most important and that is our students education. As for the issue of trust, I previously gathered information from the staff, PTA, and the District and feel more comfortable with the situation. Coming on here and making things seem more than they are is only creating drama and a negative environment. I m thankful that my daughter goes to a school that gives her opportunities and enriches her education. I will pray for all involved that you may all find peace.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2012

This is my son's 2nd school year here. He started last year as a 4th grader in the GATE academy and although he was very nervous to start at a new school, the teacher and staff/friends made him feel very welcomed. I was super happy with his 4th grade teacher and now his 5th grade teacher. My son had raved last year with how much he loved the new school and how he calls Edison his HOME !!!!! I am so happy this school opened up the GATE academy and I love my son's teacher and the staff there. They pay attention to the kids and I love the support here !!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2011

Went to our first event at this school. Saturday they had a fall festival. The principal did a great Jon organizing this event! There was games for all kids! all ages! The pta put some good food together but their chocolate cake and desserts weren't good at all. The principle had the right idea with the carnival. She had a lot of game booth. The only negative thing is I hardly saw any teachers there. You would think the principal would make it mandatory. We might want to support them more if they did I mean its there school to. Had a great time! Hope they do it again next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2011

I am a new family at Edison Academy and I am considering taking my child out of the PM Kindergarten class she is in, only to find out that there is a waiting list for the AM class in same class.I talk to parents in the morning classes on Tuesday's and each Tuesday I get more fusterated with the quality of education my daughter is recieving. I don't know a whole lot about the teachers at the school but I clearly see that my childs teacher does not meet the standard. She doesn't even seem interested in the morning opening songs to engage her class. She depends on the other nice teacher to do those extra things with the class. Like the parent said below..nice is one thing but getting the job done is another. Where and when does the principal step and notice these things? I've never seen nor heard of a Kindergarten teacher teaching the class from her chair. As ridiculous as thatsounds it happens daily.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2011

Edison is a great school. The teachers and the staff are great people. I've never had any problems. I really miss Mrs. Parker.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2011

As for the staff, I ve seen many come and go and can honestly say I agree with the post about people not accepting change. Whether you agree with every decision in the end it s about educating your children and giving them every opportunity available which as a parent should be among your highest priority, along with keeping the safe and healthy. The school is only doing what they can to make sure every child has the best education possible. Think about what the staff and PTA do for the school. How many students they care for and how many hours they put in to support Edison families. Keep in mind it stretches from teachers, administrators, aides, custodians, office staff, and yes even to the PTA to keep the school running,


Posted May 25, 2011

While this is a forum for opinion, it isn t a place to attack people. Let me start by saying that I have been a parent and PTA member at Edison for over 10 years and I work at a school so I ve seen many a lot of things over the years. As for the PTA, I have in past years seen what people have referred to as a click . However, this year I noticed a shift, new activities/events, and openness unlike before. Although I can t attend all PTA functions I know that these parents work hard to support the staff and OUR children. I know enough about the PTA to know that they can be limited on what they can spend funds on. If you had a 6th grader and spoke with your teacher you d know that they ultimately have the final say on what the class party will be and when my child was leaving what was then 5th grade it was the parents that worked with the PTA to do something extra for the students. Please remember it is all VOLUNTEER and unless you re willing to do what they do you shouldn t really bad mouth them, especially if you don t know the ins and outs of the PTA.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 24, 2011

It seems that there are a lot of complainers on here that want to bash what they don't understand. First off, the new principal is a very friendly person who has made efforts to get to know all of her Edison family. She is brand new and cannot meet/greet every family by name like the previous principal simply because she hasn't met everyone yet. As for the PTA moms strutting their stuff, I am not on the PTA but I must say that they put in 100's of hours helping in the classrooms, fundraising, and providing activities and opportunities at NO benefit to themselves. They ve tried very hard this year to involve more parents and work hard to reach out to all who choose to participate. Edison every year puts on an event for the 6th graders. This school is making big improvements and those who take the time to constructively comment to those who can make a difference rather than hiding behind anonymous online websites would know that. It IS a good school and with the new academy it ll be a great school again, reaching out to all students academic levels.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2011

I have 3 kids who have attended Edison, my oldest is now a 6th grader, who will be leaving, & she is very sad at the prospect. i have found all the teachers @Edison to be incredibly helpful, & very caring. as for the edition of our new principle and her new ideas, change is hard for everyone, but for the most part, i see it headed in a good direction. i too, miss ms. parker, but i am unwilling to bad-mouth the new principle just because she didn't come up to me and personally introduce herself. maybe the mother who is complaining about that should of gone up and introduced yourself. i'm sure it's hard for a new, and young, principle to meet personally with every parent there. as for the PTA moms strutting around like "peacocks", i am one of those moms, and i'm sorry to say i don't have time to "strut" around anywhere, as i & the other P.T.A. moms, especially the president, were too busy running around making copies, buying things teachers asked for and generally helping out in classrooms, even if we didn't personally have a child in that class. & it looked to me as if the 6th graders enjoyed their pizza & graduation cake today. if one thinks they can do better, join & do it... kat
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2011

I think I am an active parent of a child who attends Edison School. I have a child that will be going into Kindergarten & 2nd Grade for the 2011-2012 school year. Yes, I am a newer parent at the school and have seen the change from the previous school year. As a whole I think the change has been for the better. PEOPLE WILL ALWAYS OPPOSE UNFAMILAR THINGS. Any concern I have had, I have approached the principal or teacher I have had a question & was given an answer that met my expectations. I think instead of slandering the people who volunteer their time to benefit ALL the children who attend the school should take the time to say a simple thank you to the parents who stay to make copies, take the initiative to be an extra hand in the classroom when the teachers are doing they're best to make our children's education the best it can be with our states budget crisis. The PTA president walks around the school always with a smile on her face and never asking for a thing in return but a simple thank you goes a long way. For the people who complain where are your ideas? and a new principal deserves and chance not to be disrespected. It doesn't make for good moral. Proud Parent- Sasha
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2008

I think its the best school in the district I love the teachers and the principle they work very hard for these kids!!!!!!!!!! Go!!!!!!!!!! Edison
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2008

I do agree that Edison is a great school. I have helped in the classroom a number of times as well as taken work home in order too be of assistance to the Teachers. I also know many parents who do and have done the same. There are many ways to help and volunteer aside from helping in the classroom. Teachers should be supported in the best way possible and if they choose to not have a parent in the classroom they may very well have good reason, afterall it is their class and perhaps a parent may prove too be of more help from home. I dare say other times parents may prove too be a distraction or even a niussance, I feel Edison Teachers display too much class and respect to express this openly to a parent they may not desire in the classroom. Go Bobcats!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2008

Edison is a great school! I feel that the staff and Teacher are the best in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2008

I think that this is one of the better schols in the district. The staff is wonderful. The teachers are dedicated to helping their student succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

858

Change from
2012 to 2013

+15

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

858

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+15

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

121 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
49%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

121 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

134 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
64%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
59%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

105 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
41%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females69%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner56%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate40%
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females79%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner64%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate47%
Parent education - high school graduate83%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students44%
Females47%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability45%
English learner28%
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented72%
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)59%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students65%
Females58%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner47%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduate36%
Parent education - high school graduate68%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females68%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner51%
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented84%
Parent education - not a high school graduate43%
Parent education - high school graduate61%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students86%
Females90%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learner84%
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented93%
Parent education - not a high school graduate79%
Parent education - high school graduate84%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)86%
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females61%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner26%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented95%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)78%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Females63%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner28%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate57%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate76%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students51%
Females47%
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learner16%
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)72%
Parent education - college graduate59%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Females71%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learner45%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduate68%
Parent education - high school graduate63%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students64%
Females65%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino66%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented88%
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate61%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Females95%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino95%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged95%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate95%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females95%
Males95%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged95%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate95%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)85%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 80%
White 12%
Asian 2%
Black 2%
Two or more races 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 76%N/AN/A
English language learners 26%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 7%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jennifer Harrison
Fax number
  • (909) 459-2698

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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515 East Sixth Street
Ontario, CA 91764
Phone: (909) 984-5618

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