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GreatSchools Rating

Field (Eugene) Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Living in Pasadena

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $558,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,570.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 22 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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41 reviews of this school


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Posted April 9, 2014

My Child is in his second year in the Mandarin Program. The parents and teachers are fully committed to the program, however there is not much in place to support children who are struggling with learning the language. Unlike mainstream classes when children have difficulty there is a SST conducted and a plan created to get the student on track. When students are behind in this program the recommendation is more assistance at home. This is unrealistic for parents who don't read or write in Mandarin. The program needs to support students better not to mention that there is only one teacher for a class of 27plus.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2014

Our child is currently in the Mandarin Dual Language Immersion Program at Field. We are pleased with the leadership and teachers at this school. Our child is not only learning a second language but also receiving a well balanced education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2014

I am the parent of a child in the Mandarin immersion program at Field. My child has now been involved with the program for a few years. I have concerns about the instruction and administration of the program and the tension between different parents groups at Field. The Superintendent recently assigned an outside consultant to help coach the administrator at Field and mediate between the groups of parents. That should help to address some of the problems. I think the Mandarin program at Field could and should be a quality program someday but in my opinion there are many substantive problems that must be addressed before that happens.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2014

This is our third year in the Mandarin-immersion program. I ve worked in schools before and never seen a more dedicated staff. Our teachers and principal couldn t work any harder. I d like to address what the previous reviewer said re: Mandarin acquisition. We speak English at home, so I can t comment on my child s Mandarin mistakes, but I do hear him make grammar and pronunciation mistakes in English, so I would expect him to make mistakes in Mandarin as well. You can t expect perfect grade-level Mandarin in a few months or even a few years. You have to be in it for the long haul. This is program requires dedication on the parents part. We are fortunate to have a program like this in our local public school. That being said, I have read other reviews that compared Field to a private school environment and I think that is misleading. We do not have the gorgeous facilities that many private schools have, and we have larger class sizes. Unlike private schools, we have children here from all walks of life. Like many other families, we moved to PUSD to be a part of Field s Mandarin-immersion program and have not regretted it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2014

I believe a Mandarin Immersion School can provide outstanding results. This school is good in many ways. It has a strong parental group and it has Mandarin. However, the Mandarin acquired by the students is mediocre, decent at best. This wouldn't be an issue except that subjects like math and science are also taught in Mandarin. Since Mandarin isn't acquired properly in the beginning, it seems that children fall behind not just in Mandarin, but other subjects as well. If you put your child in this school (as have I), expect to get some Mandarin exposure (not fluency), and expect to do a lot outside the classroom. Volunteer as much as you can. Without proper staffing, the children have behavior issues (imagine starting school in a language you don't know with a 28:1 or 30:1 ratio at K). At the end, it depends what you want for your child. I've noticed my daughter just translates directly from English to Chinese, without using the language correctly. This to me is a challenge that I have to correct at home unless it can be done in the school. Just an honest assessment from a concerned parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 6, 2013

The Mandarin Dual Language Immersion program is cutting edge education and has a strong parental group.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2013

My daughter is in the Kindergarten Mandarin immersion class. We opted out of our wonderful top rated home school to go to Field because we feel this is a great opportunity for our child. I love that they have to wear uniforms. It feels like a private school. The principal is exceptional at Field! The parents in the Mandarin program are committed and giving and the teachers are very good at what they do and very sweet. I feel my daughter can only learn a language if it's spoken 90% of the day. We did not pick this because its Mandarin. It could have been Spanish or French. We are not particular about what language she learns. I don't expect her to be as fluent as the children are in China or know all of the characters by 8th grade. I'm realistic. I'm just happy that she will understand it and speak it. She will have respect for other ethnic groups and expand her view of the world! What I've read is: Multilingual people are good multi-taskers. Your memory improves: Language helps strengthen that mental muscle. You become more perceptive Your decision-making skills improve Companies seek employees that speak a second language because of all of the qualities listed above.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2013

They have provided a Mandarin Immersion Program that has allowed my Granddaughter to grow and thrive. She has developed reading and writing skills in both English and Mandarin and is doing beautifully!


Posted October 7, 2013

My husband and I planned to home school our 3 young children. We even built a small school house for them in which to study and be homeschooled. After visiting Field Elementary several times last year and experiencing their Mandarin immersion program, we applied for our 3 children to attend Field. We even helped create the pre-K program with the Mandarin immersion system that began this year. The teachers are exceptional and caring. The principal is actively involved. The parents are as intimately involved, if not more, than any private school we have ever experienced. This is an exceptional school and we expect that the children from this program will truly be our future leaders. They will be equipped to play, sing, solve problems, adjust quickly, make new friends, read and write in both Mandarin and English. In our current world, this is an ideal situation for our children and their future, as well as ours.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2013

This is our third year at Field Elementary. Our daughter is in second grade. We have had wonderful teacher experiences all three years. My son is so eager to start Kindergarten in the Mandarin Immersion program next fall. I have no doubt that our program is becoming one of the best Mandarin programs in the country. When our kids get to college people will ask, "Where did you learn Mandarin?" By then, I am confident that Field's MDLIP will be well known for turning out great Mandarin students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2013

Before we decided to let our son go to Field Elementary School, we toured many schools from private to public school. We decided that Field has the best to offer. Not only the classes have a diverse environment, but also the benefit of learning Mandarin. Both the school and parents are very involved with our kids education. I love how fast my son learned this new language. He's in school for less than 3 months, and he already can read and write Chinese characters. Not to mention all the cute Chinese songs that he could sing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

My daughter is in the Mandarin Immersion program at Field, and she is thriving. She is speaking, reading and writing Mandarin with impressive fluency. Most importantly, the parents at Field are super involved and are constantly pushing to improve the program. The kids are engaged and seem to love school. It's a great, diverse group of kids, but what they have in common is parents who are active and dedicated to making the most of their education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

Field has a great staff. I appreciate the diversity of students and an organized parent group that are committed to their children's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Field has a dedicated group of parents, smart and eager students, creative and flexible leadership and teachers who roll with all the changes public education faces. My favorite parent-teacher partnership is our STEAM classroom projects. Parents and teachers collaborate to author and lead engaging, hands-on projects in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics. Our pioneer and unique Mandarin Dual Language Immersion Program offers full immersion for students grade pre-K through 5. Our campus events are nothing short of spectacular, from Poetry Open-Mic Night and Festivals to elegant Gala Nights. Field is defined by ingenuity, progress and a global perspective.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Two of my children attend Field Elementary in its Mandarin Dual Language Immersion Program. The program is full of dedicated teachers and parents passionate about helping the school be the best it could possibly be. My children are both very happy at Field, and have been privileged many exceptional, fun learning experiences. As parents, we have found the school community to be extremely supportive and inspiring.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

My daughter is in a MDLIP Kindergarten class. So far I can only say great things about this school. My daughter loves her teacher and it always eager to go to school. I really respect both my daughter's teacher and the principal. Both are top notch. The communication between the teacher and parents is very refreshing. You really feel like you are a part of a community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2013

We love the Mandarin Immersion Program. But like all new programs, it takes time to build infrastructure (new teachers, curriculum building, supply needs). The lucky thing is parent involvement is extraordinary! Teachers have incredible support at their fingertips in the Mandarin classes from parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2013

After 3 years at Field Elementary, we have been extremely pleased with the variety of academic and cultural experiences that are available to our child within and outside the classroom! Addressing our child's special medical needs is of utmost importance -- the Principal and the staff have gone out of their way to ensure her safety. Field Elementary is a GREAT place to learn!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2013

I have my two children at Field Elementary now in the first grade. They love the school and I love teh experience so far. Taking on a language like Mandarin is a big deal but there is pleanty of support so I feel good about the decision to continue at the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

My daughter transferred to this school in Second Grade. She is starting 3rd this year. I am a single parent, with a pretty demanding career. The care that she gets from 7 am to 6pm is beyond what a parent can hope. Teachers and pre/after care staff are loving and supportive. Mrs Barr, teaching 3rd grade now, is truly the kid whisperer. Her level of respect to and from the Children is beyond reproach. Her teaching skills, backed with 24 years of experience, are amazing. No to mention the level of respect and honor she teaches daily. Field is also home to a Mandarin Immersion program. While my daughter is not in this program, it brings another level of excellence, with very demanding parents as well. My daughter struggled with math at the beginning of 2nd grade, by the end of the year she had mastered it and it became her favorite subject. Mrs Barr was her 2nd grade teacher, and now again her 3rd grade teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

785

Change from
2012 to 2013

-2

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

785

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-2

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
31%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
64%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
51%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students47%
Females44%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asian54%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)57%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate46%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate50%
Parent education - declined to state33%

Math

All Students52%
Females54%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asian77%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate38%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate55%
Parent education - declined to state50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students38%
Females38%
Males38%
African American31%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino30%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged24%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability39%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate20%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate50%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Females48%
Males83%
African American58%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino60%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students59%
Females64%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate63%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate76%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students70%
Females73%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learner46%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate67%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)57%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Females45%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino32%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate41%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students57%
Females55%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students41%
Females40%
Males42%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino32%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate41%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 37%
Asian 24%
White 15%
Two or more races 11%
Black 10%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 44%N/AN/A
English language learners 15%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 19%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ana Apodaca
Fax number
  • (626) 351-4202

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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3600 Sierra Madre Boulevard
Pasadena, CA 91107
Website: Click here
Phone: (626) 396-5860

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