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GreatSchools Rating

San Rafael Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Pasadena

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $785,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,400.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted November 6, 2013

San Rafael Elementary is the best kept secret in Pasadena, but that's quickly changing. We looked closely at both public and private schools but found nothing that offered as an enriching "elementary school" experience as what we thought San Rafael might offer...and now I'm convinced! It has the "classic" elementary school environment many of us parents experienced as kids, supported by an incredibly involved parent/teacher support system, beyond enriching dual language/cultural program, and is anchored by the Principal Rudy Ramirez who is a natural motivator. In my opinion, San Rafael sets the example of what an elementary school experience should be. Good luck getting in, with it's rise in popularity it's probably tougher to get into than any other Pasadena public or private school, and with its steep upward trending test scores it's catching the eye of non-Pasadena residents too. BTW, I am fluent in Spanish and my 1st grade daughter is already teaching me new Spanish words and phrases, and demonstrating learned math and problem solving skills that keep me in disbelief every time I watch her do homework! I'm truly impressed.....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2013

Our son just started Kindergarten in the dual immersion and loves it. Like all the other parents here we're very happy. At first we were hesitant about throwing him into a 100% Spanish speaking class, but he adjusted quickly and is thriving, thanks to a wonderful teacher and a parent community that is committed to doing everything possible to provide students with a high-quality education. The dual immersion program is drawing so many parents that getting into it is the biggest potential issue. The teaching is traditional and includes homework every night. Some parents may take issue with that, but we've found that it's really helped our son pick up Spanish quickly (we're not native Speakers) and work on his handwriting skills. His class is very diverse, as is the whole school, which is very important to us. San Rafael is a great school with very motivated and skillful staff. Only 2 months in but so far I highly recommend it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

We have a 1st grader and preschooler here at the school. We are brand new this year and could not be more pleased. We came from a local top-tier private school in the area. It was a bit scary taking the leap from private to public and after attending the summer school program and now starting the school year I have no regrets. What may be lacking in terms of extracurricular is more than made up for by the incredible community of highly involved principal, staff, parents and students. In addition, parents are working hard to get many extras in place for our children. The diversity here is wonderful. I love that my children will not only be learning spanish but also be in such a caring, nurturing and well run school. If you are lucky enough to get in here you won't regret it. My oldest child has not once asked about his old school and has met far more well rounded students here who are well behaved, polite, studious and kind hearted. All the money we will end up saving will also put smiles on our faces knowing we can allocate those dollars to help the public schools more and pay for additional extra curricular programs if we feel they are necessary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2013

Here's the truth: as to K-5 elementary schools, where kids are still 90%+ influenced by their parents, there is no such thing as a bad school. There are only bad parents. Private schools and destination school-districts are "great schools" because they self-select active, involved, educated, affluent parents. My kid has been at SR for Kindergarten, and is in the dual-immersion program going into first grade. This school is not the same place it was even five years ago. Scores are improving, the new principal is great, the teachers are great, parents are involved, there is community. The choice is yours! You can pay $20K/year for private school kindergarten (which blows my mind), or way more for a house in South Pasadena, or you can look into this school, or Field, or any number of other Pasadena elementary schools where you kid can get a perfectly great education and also experience real as opposed to highly-regulated diversity. Middle and high school are another issue, because of the peer pressures that kick in, but this is a great elementary school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2013

My daughter has been at SRE for 3 years in the Dual Language Immersion program. Our experience at the beginning was one of blind trust. We didn't know much about the program or the school, but since we live literally a couple of blocks from the school we decided to give it a try. We had some rocky moments in the beginning, but there was a core of talented teachers and devoted parent volunteers that turned San Rafael and the DLIP into a neighborhood gem. This Fall, our son will begin Kindergarten at SRE. He is excited about starting school here and learning to speak Spanish. We are proud this is our school and confident about the DLIP's future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2013

William F Elliott elementary school in Artesia ca and it occurred as one of the best elementary schools to attend towards wonderful high standards in academics with math and science. I truly recommend Ms. Joana Sena a fifth grade teacher who can change your ways to like school even more with helping you towards the subjects your weak at and try and help you get back on track. I am a student from Elliott elementary as class of 2009 as one of the successful student who enjoy this awesome magnet program they offer. Anyone can visit this school anytime and hope that your minds will be transform as your child enters this school and graduates as a confident learner towards further higher grade level.


Posted September 3, 2012

My son started Kindergarten last year in the DLIP. WOW! Are we SO happy. We had SOME reservations at first, we took him out of private school to get into this program. He is now starting 1st grade and continues to thrive. This ischool has an amazing group of parents,some fantastic teachers, and NOW a principal who seems a PERFECT fit for the wonderful school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2012

What a great time it is to be at San Rafael! In 2009, San Rafael school introduced one of PUSD's Signature Programs with the Spanish Dual Language Immersion Program. Teachers are AMAZINGLY talented at instruction in both languages and there's a strong and active parent community. For the 2012-2013 school year, the bilingual principal and additional Immersion teachers have raised the bar for quality in public education in Pasadena.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2011

My daughter entered the Dual Language Immersion program last September. We transferred her from a private school as this is our neighborhood school and we were excited about the program. This school has been equal to and in some ways even better than the private school she was previously attending. The parental involvement is far greater at San Rafael. The teachers and administration all care so much. They go the extra mile for the children in so many ways. My daughter is well nurtured, well educated and, oh yes....SPEAKING SPANISH!!!! We can't believe how much progress she has made since September. She didn't speak a single word going in and now she is speaking in full sentences and singing whole songs - and she LOVES it. I am also very impressed with the LEARNS after school program. It is very structured and she gets homework help. She is learning Spanish dancing and how to sew. At the private school, the after school program was pretty much a free for all. LEARNS is much more organized and we like it so much better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2011

I am a parent of a kindergarten student in San Rafael's Dual Immersion Program. My younger daughter is scheduled to enter kindergarten next year as well. I couldn't be more impressed with the quality of the teachers and the parent involvement. It is clear that we made the right choice for our daughter. Although it is not our home school, it really feels like home to us. Not perfect (but what is?), but a caring community (staff and parents) makes up for the limitations.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2011

My daughter is in the dual language program and I couldn't be more pleased about the decision we made. I had felt that public school wasn't an option for our children with all the cuts to education. But I have no doubt she is getting the best possible education offered in Pasadena. She is in Kindergarten and reading and writing in both Spanish and English already. She runs to her classroom each morning and is so enthusiastic about her work. She is singing in the school musical and participating in a Daisies troop on campus. The biggest and best surprise was the community of parents involved in the DLP. They are intelligent, committed, warm and just terrific! I am so pleased this will be our community through the school years and hopefully beyond!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2011

My child is in the Dual immersion Spanish program and we love it. Both the school and class sizes for kindergarten are small. My son spoke no spanish when we started, and within months he is speaking and reading in 2 languages. The teachers are attentive, communicative and available. The level of parent involvement is high. San Rafael is a lovely school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2011

We took a leap of faith when we decided to send our son to San Rafael. He was the first Kindergarten class in the Dual Immersion program and the results are undeniably amazing. I never realized how important it is to be biliterate as well as bilingual. Truly when I observe the class and hear the children talk in a language that is not their first (for half of them) it blows me away! The teachers are incredibly dedicated to the success of the children. In his two years at the school, his teachers have gone above and beyond their required duty! They are teaching a language, while teaching the curriculum that is required by the state. So basically my son is learning everything in 2 languages. He is not getting half of an education. He is getting twice the education. The campus is in a beautiful neighborhood. And more improvements will be coming once funds are released from measure tt. Overall had I to make the decision over again I would send my son here! In fact I will be sending my daughter in the fall. San Rafael has a diverse, caring, and nurturing community that is growing every day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2011

My child is in the Spanish immersion program and loves it! Not only is the school site charming, the spanish program has attracted a really committed, diverse, and dynamic group of parents. I did not think my child would learn s0 quickly. Half way through kindergarten, he is reading and writing in spanish. He has also made some amazing friends. Thank you, PUSD, for starting this program!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2010

As the parent of twins here at San Rafael, I am pleased with the school and the character of the staff and leaders. This little gem of a school is moving toward greatness and we all need to continue to help it succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2009

As a kindergarten family, we are thrilled to be in Pasadena s first dual immersion (Spanish) program at San Rafael Elementary. The principal is thoughtful & dedicated (it was under her leadership that both the district s inclusion and dual immersion programs came to San Rafael) and the teachers and support staff are all working together to turn San Rafael into a high performing school. Although the API is fair (748), it is clearly on the rise and with the growing support of everyone involved at SR, SR will easily be a high performing school within the next five years. In terms of the dual immersion program, the teachers are giving 300% of their time and talent to make the DLP a life changing experience for my daughter and her classmates. SR also has a pre-school and PasadenaLEARNs after school program for all kids, K-6th grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 25, 2009

My twins are in kindergarten at San Rafael Elementary. The teachers in their Dual Language class are AMAZING! I chose San Rafael because of this unique program, but I am equally happy with the school overall. It is a wonderful community to be in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2009

I am new at San Rafael Elementary, and my daughter is in the new Dual Language Spanish Immersion Program. The teachers are truly remarkable, and go above and beyond what is expected. This school has had its trials, but I sincerely believe San Rafael is headed for greatness with the recent, incredible surge of community/parental support and caring, giving nature of the staff and teachers. It may not have all the bells and whistles of other programs, but it is a small, wonderful group of people who care about each and every child in that school. This school is going to thrive, and I am proud to be a part of choosing to rebuild and ignite our neighborhood public school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2009

Unfortunately the leadership in the school is lacking and extrememly uneven. There are teachers who care about teaching and helping to create a well rounded student, but they along with the parents have had to fight hard battles to see this come to fruition. Quite often the teacher's hands were tied. Personal experience with the leadership in the school has shown unprofessionalism on several occassions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 18, 2009

San Raphael Elementary School under the leadership of Ms. Beecher has proven to be a place of great caring and inspiration for my two children. My daughter's confidence in regards to her school work and peer has improved and she loves the school. Teaachers have managed to channel my sons abounding energy into the classroom and he will enter the 'GATE' program next year. Needless to say I'm very pleased with all aspects of San Raphael.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

834

Change from
2012 to 2013

+54

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

834

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+54

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
20%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
53%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
44%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females72%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learner45%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females72%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females63%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate42%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate54%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females74%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate58%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females71%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females76%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner40%
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate73%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students47%
Females54%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students52%
Females54%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students37%
Females46%
Males29%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability41%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 62% 52%
White 19% 26%
Black 11% 6%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 11%
Two or more races 2% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 59%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Rodolfo Ramirez
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (626) 683-7429

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Gifted / high performing
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • Spanish

Resources

Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School facilities
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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1090 Nithsdale Road
Pasadena, CA 91105
Website: Click here
Phone: (626) 396-5790

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