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GreatSchools Rating

Georgia Brown Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 520 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted September 23, 2013

Best kept secret in Paso Robles! I have one college student who went through Georgia Brown. He is now an award winner at Cal Poly University, with almost a 4.0 gpa. Now I have a 5 year old going through the program. I am very impressed. Scores are low at the school because testing is done in English. Many students do not speak English yet. Also, students learn how to read in Spanish first, but standardized testing is given in English, making it difficult to obtain high scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2012

two daughters have gone through the program. last one in fourth grade now. oldest told us after the first day of kinder that the only word she understood was her name. after a few weeks she got it. after 6 years she is bilingual. awesome school and a great staff. the real shame is the shrinking budget and ever increasing class sizes. we have driven 20 miles for years to take our children here. do not regret it at all. as others have stated, you must be willing to get involved and work to make this type of education benefit your child. we did and are very happy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2012

Immersion means just that. Many of the teachers switch back to English as soon as difficulties arise communicating their thoughts in Spanish. This defeats the purpose of an immersion program. The school wide self manager program is a waste of time and the subjective way some of the teachers carry out this program is damaging to a student's self esteem. Overall, I have found about 30% of the teachers effective, insightful, caring and engaged.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2012

My son has been going to Georgia Brown for 2 years now, K and 1st. We are have a lot of concerns about him not understanding the teachers and being very confused on what to do. He is getting in a lot of trouble because his writing and reading are below average. "He's not concentrating, listening, or doing his writing assignments as asked". My son is very bright, that's why we chose this school, to challenge him. I can see the confusion in his face when he has a writing assignment for homework. He says he doesn't understand it. He is excelling in math! Loves it! He understands it! I now feel that he is falling behind in english and spanish and will have a hard time catching up if we change schools. I think the school is "trying" to do all they can to provide a good education but they don't have a system in place for those that might need a little more help getting their brains to learn and function in spanish. Not every child learns the same. They can't take 35 kids in the same class and expect them to learn the exact same way. We have approached them about this but overall haven't seen any difference. We were so excited about this oppertunity but now regret such a hard decision.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 27, 2010

My two oldest have gone through the program and I am pleased to say that they are 4.0+ students and never knew a lick of Spanish prior to the program. My first born just passed her AP Spanish with a 5/5 as a sophmore in High School. Bilingual education works but you must be involved as a parent. It is our job to educate our kids. We transferred in from an Orange County program, it took some adjusting but the staff is great and we are a better family as a result. "Everyone can be a critic... however those who get involved and find solutions alongside the staff and community will reap the benefits of well educated and socialized kids!"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2010

My daughter was there for 5 years. She told me once, it took her about 4 years to finally understand what the teachers were saying... in a sufficient capacity to fully participate. What price for bilingualism? she lost 4 years of critical education and learned only that education is hard to understand, and confusing, and she felt lost. Bilingualism is great, but as an add on. This system is a tragedy and my mexican friends tell me the same thing, graduates are NOT fluent in english and will suffer the rest of their lives because of it. Fortunately, I rescued my daughter in time and worked extensively to repair the damage in time. The job of schools are not to teach tolerance, that is the parents job, the job of the schools is to prepare them for productive intelligent lives w/ a full basic education and mastery of the 3-R's
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2009

This school is one of the best in the area with their teachers and students they make the best learning team.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2009

I am a parent of a 3rd grader who has been at Georgia Brown for four years (K-3) and we are extremely pleased with the bilingual immersion education. Even the kids who struggled with reading initially (in K and 1st grade) are now biliterate . The fact is that every kid can be bilingual and it is a shame that in America we don't teach all kids two languages (at least two!). In our case our son is very advanced and for him it is such a blessing to be learning a second language. We are not fluent in Spanish, I had four years of Spanish and my husband had about one year of Spanish. Our son left us in the dust at about mid-first grade easily. He reads Spanish chapter books and takes comprehension tests on them (AR tests), so we know his comprehension is great. The teachers are excellent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2008

Although I see the academic progress my son has made with the support of an excellent teacher, there are many ongoing safety concerns I have and language barriers that prevent my son from being able to communicate to yard duty staff when he is roughed up by other boys. These issues have been communicated to supervisors since first month of school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2008

My son, Colby, throughly enjoys Georgia Brown. He is learning Spanish at an excelerated rate and he is only in 1st grade!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

I have 3 children attending Georgia Brown. This is not by default. I drive 35 miles a day and deal with 2 districts for transfer approvals inorder for my children to attend GeorgiaBrown. I do this because my children deserve the chance to become better thinkers(see the research), better citizens, more employable, and more understanding of another culture (watch the media). Our world is full of racism, ignorance, arrogance. My children are educated in a place where everyone is valued; everyone is celebrated. Yes, the test scores can be low. Yet, these are not the scores of my own children. The scores are low as a result of many children having never attended preschool, of students whose parents work 3 jobs to make ends meet. GeorgiaBrown recognizes these needs and steps up. They have fabulous after school programs and dedicated teachers. We are lucky to be apart of this terrific school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2006

My son is beginning the second grade at Georgia Brown Elementary and my husband and I could not be happier. We are impressed with his ability to read, write, communicate and solve arithmetic problems in Spanish. I studied Spanish for three years in High School and College, and he knows more than I do. His depth of vocabulary and pronunciation is amazing. The teachers are committed and very talented. I wish there was more involvement from the Spanish speaking parents. I recommend the school to everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2006

Our daughter is a first grader at G. Brown. We have been impressed by the quality of instruction and the commitment and concern shown by her teachers. By the end of kindergarten, she could read, write and do math above grade level in Spanish although she is a native English speaker. We chose this school so that she would be challenged academically and we have not been disappointed. In addition, the exposure to another language and culture has been invaluable and enriching to our whole family. We believe that the dual immersion program will better prepare her for our modern world as well as increase her verbal skills. The PTA is very active in providing extracurricular activities including arts programs and field trips. One area for improvement would be to engage more of the parents of English Learners as volunteers. This will be the challenge of the new bilingual principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2006

I have seen a lot of confused little faces there. When an English speaking girl was asked, 'How much do you understand of what they teach in the classroom?' he reply was..... 'Oh, some, not much' I wonder what rich and in depth education they are missing as they sit there and wonder what the heck the teacher is saying as she speaks in fluent Spanish Only. By 5th grade, they do learn Spanish, but at what cost to the full and rich in depth education they could have if they only knew the words. What lesson was taught about learning? That it is difficult, frustrating and confusing? Spanish as a Second language is wonderful, but as the Primary language in the USA, is harmful to the English speakers and holds back the Spanish speakers. Check the scores. Where is the benefit down the road? Poor scores in middle school?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2004

Our child has had an outstanding experience, and we have been very impressed with the teachers commitment level and interest in our child's development.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

765

Change from
2012 to 2013

-33

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

765

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-33

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
25%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
47%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
69%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students27%
Females28%
Males26%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino16%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)45%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability28%
English learner10%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduate38%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state12%

Math

All Students60%
Females62%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state36%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students40%
Females42%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)65%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability39%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate14%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to state33%

Math

All Students56%
Females46%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learner34%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate36%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to state50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females58%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learner28%
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to state48%

Math

All Students61%
Females52%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner41%
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduate54%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to state62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females75%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner7%
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate20%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state50%

Math

All Students49%
Females69%
Males29%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino32%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate13%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state33%

Science

All Students37%
Females50%
Males23%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate7%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state25%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 69%
White 25%
Asian 1%
Black 1%
Two or more races 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 61%N/AN/A
English language learners 49%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Language learning

Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ellalina Emrich-Keller
Fax number
  • (805) 237-3426

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Library
School leaders can update this information here.

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525 36th Street
Paso Robles, CA 93447
Phone: (805) 769-1200

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