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GreatSchools Rating

Valley View Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Living in Pleasanton

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $707,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,670.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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20 reviews of this school


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Posted February 13, 2014

I'm really please with how involved our second grader's teacher, Mrs. Johnston, is with everyone in school. We recently moved here and she was very warm in welcome us. I especially appreciate how she proactively communicates with us and involves us as our son adjusts to his new environment (we recently moved from SoCal).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2013

My daughter went to Valley View for 4 years. The leadership at the school was horrible. When problems arose, the principal was slow to resolve them. Other parents had the same complaint. unfortunately. The discipline in the school...awful. I cannot count the number of times my child came home complaining about the teachers inability to control the class. I always followed up with an observation- and was surprised at the number of disruptions to instruction. The office secretary has good days and bad days and you always knew when you walked in which one she was having. This is not the cream of the crop of the Pleasanton Schools. Enroll elsewhere.


Posted September 10, 2013

Great immersion program, teachers are very well prepare, and approachable,caring and my kids are very happy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2013

OK, the EI program is great. Agreed. The school overall? It astounds me that no one seems to be aware that the schools performance is so low that it is designated as "Needs Improvement". The staff? I have observed impatience, raised voices and lack of respect towards students. Is it a big surprise I observe the students being disrespectful to subs and adults? The leadership always strikes me as disinterested, lethargic and in need of a nap. Many parents are unhappy with this school- the parents who have high standards and have been to good schools themselves through good fortune. Don't send your child here unless the DI program is suitable for your child. There are better schools in Ptown. This school is awful- we just hoped that it would get better and it never did. The best teacher- Mrs. Day left for greener pastures for good reason.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

Valley View is a wonderfully unique school. There are Dual Immersion and English-only programs, and yet the school community is very cohesive. There a many events where the children have opportunities to learn from different cultures. There is a Multi-cultural Fair each year that is very well attended. The school facility is 50 years old and to celebrate this milestone, the school had a large charity event, and the school and community have upgraded the school with many new trees, flower beds, art walls throughout the school and a new area in front of the school with tables, umbrellas, benches, and information boards. The Principal, Mr. Cruz is extremely caring and approachable. I can't say enough positive things about him. Focus on the love of learning, honesty, respect and integrity, are modeled by an incredible group of educators. The standards are high, as well as the teacher's support in students achieving these standards. Parent/teacher interaction is at an extremely high level. Every person at VV, from the principal through the custodial staff are involved in the educational experience. My daughter started in 1st grade, is now in 4th grade we both love her school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2011

I have seen much better than valley view, especially in Pleasanton. Most of the teachers are wonderful but some are just not patient at all. I have walked past Mrs Gunn's class room to hear her actually screaming at the children 3 separate times, it was horrifying behavior for a teacher. Principal Cruz in very inexperienced but he cares about the kids and stands by his teachers. Rosemary runs the office and is absolutely amazing. The parking is a complete nightmare. The parking lot is tiny and over crowded and a complete mess during drop off and pick up times. You are better off parking 3 blocks away and walking than waiting for 40 minutes in traffic.The staff directing traffic are incredibly rude to the children and parents, but I cant say I blame them. With the parking lot the way it is that would be the worst job in the school. Over all, with so many great schools in Pleasanton this one disappointing. Im giving it two stars for that reason, because in Pleasanton you have your pick of some of the best schools in the Bay, and compared to others it is below average.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

The school, although with limited budget, is always going the extra mile to make learning fun
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

It has a fantastic dual immersion program as well as just being a wonderful caring place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

Offers great dual immersion program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2009

We are a California Distinguished School that has also won the CABE Seal of Excellence for a Dual immersion Program. The dedicated and professional staff rocks!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Valley View is a great school with first class teachers. We have a stellar spanish dual-immersion program in half the school, however it does not over-shadow the english-only side of the school. Families from all socio-economic backgrounds co-exist and even thrive together. Our school is multi-cultural, with varying degrees of affluence, yet we still have a lot of cohesion here. Special things about our school include the Go Green Committee, the school garden, the Wellness Committee, Family Fun Nights, and lot's of fun activities for the kids all year long.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 26, 2008

My daughter starts there this fall in there Kinder and we as a family are very excited for her. The school was very helpful and caring about help us decide were to send our daughter. It was between a mono lingue school or dual immersion.The teacher were very excited about the DI program and the excitement was brought over to us as parents. But most of all our daughter wanted to go and learn spanish!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2008

Very high parental involvement which is great for any school, however I feel that the whole learning process here is all about getting the children to 'test' well and get high scores for the school. Much of the homework is tedious and unecessary (spelling the same works over and over for example). My child has gone to more creative schools with far lower ratings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2006

Since the program has gained so much popularity, they should make more strict guidelines along with testing for program qualifications. Besides this issue, the school is fantastic! The principal is great and works closely with the Parent Faculty Club. The PFC does an excellent job raising funds for the school and the parent involvement is unbelievable. Best of all, the teachers are caring and highly qualified. I feel that my child is excelling because of this environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2005

I have two children at the VV dual immersion program, which is of very high quality. My elder child is also in the gifted (GATE) program. Parents dislike that it is not a distinguished school, but in my opinion, a better cultural mix helps us face the real world, and the introduction of a second language has a very high importance in my estimation. (My ex-husband and I spent significant time abroad speaking and conducting business in another language.) The teachers are outstanding. One problem is that the leadership (principal) has changed twice in two years. Hopefully, this is the end of that trend. I feel strongly positively about this program and about the overall quality of my children's education. Math club, science programs, and programs such as chorus and Strings (musical string instruments) are well integrated. Kids perform in Spanish. Parent help is in the classroom almost 100%.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2005

My child has learned a tremendous amount in her 4 years at this school. The dual immersion program is fantastic...her Spanish is so fluent and her interest in other cultures is directly related to her participation in this program. It has been a wonderful experience for the entire family. I definitely would recomend it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2005

Great teachers and Parent involvement seems to be a big plus here!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2005

Valley View Elementary is an outstanding school where the staff is extremely dedicated, and the parent involvement is outstanding. They provide lots of help for those students in need through thier Resource department and homework clubs. They have a wonderful music program, and are always getting the children involved in the arts - whether it is by attending musicals, recitals, plays or putting them on themselves. The Dual Immersion program is growing in popularity and has wonderful and experienced teachers willing to put extra time to make sure the curriculum works. It is a fantastic school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2004

It's a great school with high involvement of both teachers and parents. We particularly like the Spanish biligual program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2004

The Teachers are outstanding, Administrative Staff is friendly and always available to assist parents, the Principal and Resource Specialist are extremely caring about the students, any student and the Parents are awesome!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

887

Change from
2012 to 2013

-12

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

887

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-12

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
63%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females78%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asian82%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disability23%
Students with no reported disability78%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females78%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability79%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)84%
Parent education - college graduate76%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Females60%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disability8%
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner10%
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate23%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females67%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disability17%
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner50%
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate29%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females87%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students81%
Females81%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females84%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian82%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)92%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students79%
Females80%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino68%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)92%
Parent education - college graduate76%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students75%
Females71%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian82%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)92%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 49%
Hispanic 34%
Asian 9%
Two or more races 5%
Black 2%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 15%N/AN/A
English language learners 22%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 4%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Rafael Cruz
Fax number
  • (925) 426-0731

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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480 Adams Way
Pleasanton, CA 94566
Website: Click here
Phone: (925) 426-4230

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