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GreatSchools Rating

Lincoln Elementary School

Public | PK-5 | 23 students

 

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Living in Pomona

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $190,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,250.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted August 19, 2013

Lincoln Elementary came a long way in the last few years. The PTA has had record teacher, parent and student involvement, winning the Legacy Award and receiving tons of awards from city, state and national officials. If there were any teachers who had given up, they are no longer here. Every single teacher excels beyond their responsibilities and job requirements to ensure "every" student is cared for. The special education staff is hands down some of the most dedicated, caring and patient staff. Alicia McMullin (Principal) takes the time to know each student's name and gets involved in their lives as both a administrator and a caring coach. From Mr. Baker & Mrs. Yenjai in Kinder, to the 3rd grade dynamic duo, Mrs. Lo & Mrs. Martinez, to the hard working 6th grade teachers Mrs. Hill, Mrs. Gonzalez, & Mr. Lopez, to the Mrs. Rafael who takes on 4th grade, as well as train our Baile Folkl rico afterschool (who recently performed at Disneyland). Bravo Lincoln teachers & staff! You continue amaze me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2013

I would like to give this school 1.5/5 stars only because when I attended nearly 30 years ago I had a great first and second grade teachers. Everything changed when I hit third grade. Halfway through the year my parents realized there were disruptive children in the class and we had learned nothing. My parents who could not afford to ripped me out of that school halfway through the year and placed me in private school. I spent over 2 years catching up to what the children in private school knew in math and reading. Thank goodness my parents cared enough about my education to make this move. I now have a Masters degree in education and since I have the memory of an elephant I can now see how atrocious my 3rd grade teacher's performance was. My parents were incredibly involved my my education so much as to assign me additional homework after school to makeup for the gaps in my public education. A lot can change in 30 years but by the looks of it for this school sadly not much improvement has been made since when I attended.


Posted April 5, 2013

The teachers at Lincoln go above and beyond to reach each individual student. I have had nothing but positive experiences with Lincoln. The new principal is very involved and goes out of her way to support the students and families. I wish more parents would get involved with the PTA. It has evolved greatly in the last few years, but the committed members of PTA are very few.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2013

My son went from A's to F's... How is it possible to get B's in your math work in class and get an F on the State Test. My son's teacher has had it up to here with him. I met with his teacher and the pricipal to help them understand his condition (PTSD), but they continue to see his color not his issues. I HATE THIS SCHOOL.....It is not a school African American children should attend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2012

I do not recommend this Elementary for your children. I attended this elementary from K-5th grade and came out not well prepared for middle school. Most of the teachers here are not qualified teachers for your children. I know this from experience. Some teachers can be discriminatory without you (parents) knowing it. LIncoln Elementary needs to be supervised real well in order to have great and deserving teachers who will actually teach their students and respect them. Please care for your children and their education.. it's for the good of their future. -Experience as a student here!.


Posted February 29, 2012

My son has been at this school for two years now and I am so ready to remove him. First of all, lack of communication with his 1st grade teacher (won't mentioned name) is like saving the titanic from sinking. My child has ADHD and I've been trying to communicate with her to keep a daily report with me and she doesn't want to comply. All she does is complain like there is no tomorrow. They don't even have special Ed classes of programs for special needs children. What happen to a caring teacher? What happen to "I want to help" teacher? They don't excess anymore, will at least not at this school. I would not recommend this school. They have the worst testing scores in the area. One good thing about Licoln is the principal try's to be involved. She knows the students by their name. But pls don't send ur hold here especially if your BIG on education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

I had someone come up to me and ask 'Do you like Lincoln Elementary?' not sure why they were asking - I said Yes I do like Lincoln - if I didn't I would not be putting my third child through this school. I myself have been involved at Lincoln for over 12 years now - we have been through 4 principals, several teachers have come and gone - but one thing remained the same - the reason that all of the staff comes to work everyday - FOR THE KIDS. I watched one principal on Friday's during lunch, in his suit, changed into tennis shoes and played soccer with the kids. The teachers have kids that come back - some several years later - to visit and say HI and thank you! That says something about the teachers and school. I would recommend this school to anyone looking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2010

Wow I have to comment on the negative report posted 3/31/10. Parent involvement is a key part of our children's success. To have your children go from one extreme to another is not the fault of the teachers. Sometimes children lose focus and that's when the parents need to step in a give that extra care. I have been a proud parent of Lincoln Elem. for four years. I love the staff and I do recommend this school to anyone. But parents, there needs to be more participation within the school. If it's just helping in your child's class or going the extra mile and helping wherever needed. We make the difference for the school! Lincoln Teachers and Staff, keep on doing what your doing. Your doing a great job.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2010

What makes a good elementary school? Certainly the relationship the child has with the teacher is paramount. Teachers at Lincoln Elementary welcome into their classrooms students from a wide variety of backgrounds. The teachers embrace their children with love and support knowing that each one can succeed, despite the challenges that they might face at home. I have seen here a dedication unparalleled in the many schools I have come across through my career. Some teachers volunteer their time after school, without pay, to tutor students who need extra help. Others provide students with their phone numbers to assist with learning projects and homework. Still others make home visits to check on students or make sure learning plans are explained and understood. Good teaching is a work of heart. It is clear to me that there is plenty of love to go around at Lincoln.


Posted April 1, 2010

I have taught at Lincoln Elementary for 10 years, and in that time it has gone from a school with 'no' test scores, to a mid 700 range. Do we have room for improvement? Of course. Will we make the scores set forth by our government? I am not sure. But if not, it is certainly not because of the lack of hard work, love, and care of our teachers towards our students. I have worked at numerous other schools and districts over the years, and Lincoln, has by far, the best teachers. I would not want to work with another staff. The vast majority go way above and beyond for their students. We are often more than just a teacher but also a counselor, confidant, champion, friend, and sometimes even a parental figure. Lincoln Rocks!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 1, 2010

I am very disappointed to read the previous comment. It is not at all an accurate reflection of Lincoln. Lincoln's staff is very professional and cares about every single child that walks through its doors. They are dedicated to providing the best for their students. As a parent myself, I think it is important for all of us to think about what we can do to help our children be successful when they are struggling and not blame it on the school. They do the very best they possibly can and do a lot more during the day than they are given credit for. We are part of the school community and it is our responsibility to get involved. Support Lincoln because they support your children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2010

My 2 girls attended 1 year and it was a big dissapointment . 1 Went from a's to d's & other 1from b's to f's. I took them out ! now attend ca. Distinguished schools & getting a's again but my 2nd is still strugling to adjust back. Teachers in her new school are very caring and really helping. I lived in pomona i had to drive for 2 years back and forth to covina everyday but was totally worth it. My girl is now an honor student for 2 years in a row thanks to the wonderful teachers in her new school! no offense but teachers in lincoln didn't care about their sucess as well as most of the parents. I would not recommend this school to anyone! teachers need to care more for students!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

It's a celebration of history. Chldren still learning to love education at a school that has been an institution in Pomona for years. Of course, hard-working teachers!


Posted August 5, 2009

Last year was the first year my daughter attended Lincoln. I was really disappointed that the selection in schools available and that would rank like her previous school 'California Distinguished' could not be found. What really troubled me was the ranking for the schools in the PUSD. I being a college graduate and a firm believer that school is a priority none of the schools rank a 10 like those in the West Los Angeles area where I work as an Academic Counselor for UCLA. At the end of the year I was not surprised that my daughter did great but her thirst and motivation decreased as time went by and I had a difficult time pushing her to do well. Her teacher was great at pushing her to excel and exceed expectations like she did at her previous school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2007

My children have attended Lincoln for 4 years. We moved from an area where the schools are supposed to be quite good and I have found Lincoln to be much better than the elementary school my older two children attended. The quality of the teachers is extremely high and it has had extremely dedicated principals. I noticed one parent's comment that he or she feels his or her child is not safe at Lincoln. That has not been my experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2007

Our children have attended Lincoln for four years. We love the diversity in student population, the quality of instruction, and the additional resources directed at after school tutoring and parental education. From the advanced computer lab to the huge success of their Winter Show, this school has indeed turned the corner and will be a flagship elementary for Pomona Unified. I should add that I have never had a reason to question the safety of my children either before, during, or after school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2007

This is my childs 1st yr at Lincoln and her last. It is not that her teach[er] is bad, as a matter of fact her teacher is wonderful and great with the kids. I had also talked with the new principal and she has a very big job ahead of her. My issue with the school is safty. This school is not safe.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2006

I do not feel very safe leting my child atten ths school. Quality of education is very low. Standards are low.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2005

I had my child in Lincoln Elementary from Kindergarten to second grade. I vowed not to let my child go any further with this school. The principal (Mr. Amancio) does not like to deal with parents who voice their opinions. He likes to hold the reigns and prefers the parents do not voice or speak their opinions. I felt the staff in the office lacked as much people skills as their leader, with the exception of one secretary who has been there for many many years.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

728

Change from
2012 to 2013

+10

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

728

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+10

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
11%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
36%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
40%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
28%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
34%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students28%
Females33%
Males22%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino28%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learner12%
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students35%
Females33%
Males37%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged34%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate41%
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)38%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students27%
Females34%
Males14%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino29%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability27%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only29%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate25%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state40%

Math

All Students46%
Females44%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learner52%
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate45%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females55%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner42%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate76%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students56%
Females50%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged55%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner37%
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate71%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students44%
Females58%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learner10%
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state53%

Math

All Students42%
Females48%
Males34%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learner19%
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state40%

Science

All Students44%
Females42%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learner19%
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 90% 52%
Black 3% 6%
White 3% 26%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 11%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 86%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Alicia McMullin
Fax number
  • (909) 620-0982

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Volunteer in the classroom
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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1200 North Gordon Street
Pomona, CA 91768
Website: Click here
Phone: (909) 397-4624

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