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GreatSchools Rating

Solana Santa Fe Elementary School

Public | K-6

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted April 25, 2014

Our two children have done very well at this school. Solana Santa Fe is what a school should be: an organization that helps those who earn the right to an excellent education, and does well to remove students and other elements that might distract from the betterment of the whole. Overall, we can't imagine how any other school could do a better job in today's increasingly difficult and more competitive arena. Our children have been encouraged and driven to excell, and that they have. Thank you Solana Santa Fe!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 24, 2013

My son has an IEP and the team at SSF has been amazing. Almost every teacher, aide and staff member in the whole school is bright, interested and innovative. He has HFA and a very high IQ so offers odd challenges and they meet them with grace and enthusiasm. Principal Bering is great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2013

Pros: 1. Small class size (16-22 in the lower grades) 2. Well funded compared to other public schools. The school asks for a hefty donation from each family at the beginning of the year, and most families comply. Cons 1. Lack of before/after school care- If you are a dual income family, be prepared to STRESS like no other on what to do with your child while you work, especially after school and during the summer. The only option right now is to be bussed to the community center, which closes at 5 and very few children do it. 2. Lack of differentiation- I agree with previous posts that teachers have low tolerance for children who are "out of the box." Same with bright students- they will likely get bored. 3. Ipads- I wish it would serve a more useful purpose than to "babysit." Parents spent so much money on these, and students are playing games while the teacher focuses on a small group of students. In regards to Stepfordville, to each his own. We are a dual income family, drive Hondas, and buy our kids backpacks and clothes from Target and Old Navy. Yes, we go here too (maybe we can form a group?). We are happy with our frugal and minimalist lifestyle.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2013

Welcome to Stepfordville. Please enjoy your stay. This school is filled with Real Housewives who come to the drop off and pick up in skimpy tennis wear with designer bags. Their priorities and value systems are success at any cost, and the school caters to this perfectly. There is zero creative or independent thought at this school, it is teach to the test. Kindergarteners learn how to fill in bubbles with their number two pencils within the first few weeks of school. While the school certainly has a great policy against bullying, and I am pleased that the poster's child's bullying problem was addressed, the larger issue remains as to why the child was bullied in the first place. The answer, I believe, is because the school sets a competitive, win/succeed at-any-cost atmosphere and defines very narrowly what it means to be successful. There is not a lot of tolerance for those who are different or who think outside of the box. Moreover, this comes not just from the students, but from the teachers. I personally have observed children in distress emotionally whose needs were ignored by multiple staff members in close proximity. Not a caring environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2013

Solana Santa Fe Elementary has an excellent staff and parent involvement. This school's no tolerance on bullying is something my child experienced first hand. Although my child's experience was being bullied in a lighter nature, the teachers and staff addressed it immediately and with appropriate action. If you want your child to succeed in life and do well in their educational career, this is the school for you. This school prepares you for learning, test taking, social skills and having great life skills they will need long term.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2013

If Bentleys, iPads, and good test scores are of the utmost importance to you, then this is the school for you. If, on the other hand, you are looking for a kind and loving environment for your child, think twice before enrolling your child at this school. The school pushes, pushes, and pushes, all in the name of those test scores and an excellent front page write up in the Rancho Santa Fe Review. This push at any cost attitude results in students who learn to take a test, but may be devoid of any critical thought process. It also results in a lot of frustration in the lower grades, when good students become frustrated that they are not perfect, and when those that are developmentally slower (dare I say normal) feel downright dumb. All in the name of the great race to nowhere. One wonders when these kids will burn out, if not in elementary school, surely by the seventh grade. Many of the parents have tutors for their kids, not because a child has any particular deficiency, but simply to keep up. There are certainly some good teachers here, and a lot of parent involvement, but the culture is go, go, go, and please think only in the box.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2011

Exceptional school. My two children have loved their SSF experience and we have been duly impressed and pleased with the Principal, the teachers and staff. It is a very nurturing, positive and intimate environment with high academic standards. The PTO is very generous with it's time and energy and the family community at large is very giving which has helped the school maintain it's extra services like PE, Music, Art and Science to name a few. It has ethnic and socio economic diversity which is refreshing and valuable for the children's experiences and education. There have been some bullying issues but to be fair, no more than other schools as this has become a pervasive and more serious problem in today's world. In response, SSF has thankfully implemented an anti-bullying program that is proving to be effective and helpful for the children in learning how to resolve conflict and take a stand (victim or bystander) against the bully in a safe and productive way. The program also does a lot of proactive modeling of positive behavior and promotes empathy and kindness. It is a very safe and happy place overall and I can't say enough about this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2011

I feel so lucky to send my kids to this amazing school! It feels like a private school, the teachers are amazing, I love and respect the principal, it's just an overall excellent school environment and every day I feel thankful this this is where my 3 kids will go from kindergarten through 6th grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2010

This school and all of its staff, including the administration, are excellent! The academics are superior at all grade levels. I am thrilled with all that my daughter learned in her kindergarten year last year. My son has also had an amazing experience at the upper grade levels.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2010

I have two girls who have gone through this school. The education at the school is superior to most other public schools because the socio-economics of the zip code is rather unique therefore the additional funds for extras is available. In the last few years though, there has been a growing lack of action in resolving an increasing bullying problem with the girls at the school. Many parents are concerned about the issue and have not found the expected support from the current principal. This has led several parents to choose to leave the school and move into some of the private schools of the area. It is very disconcerting that we have children who are feeling intimidated by their peers at this young age and don't see their authoritative figures assisting in a solution.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2010

Fabulous School! Four of our children have graduated from Solana Santa Fe. They have been very well prepared for their future education. Wonderful administration, excellent teachers, extremely involved and giving parents, outstanding PTO. All parties consider 'What's best for Kids' when making decisions. Open to new ideas, strive to educate the 'whole child.' Can't imagine a better elementary school experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2009

This is an outstanding school. My children have flourished here thanks to the excellent and caring teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 28, 2007

This is a great school~Great teachers, excellent parent involvement!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2007

We have two kids (K, 2nd grade) in the school and we are very happy with the school. It is a small school with a lot of parent involvement and financial support, providing many services not found in many public schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 14, 2006

My son has been to this school for 5th and 6th grade and I have been very impressed witht the level of teaching and specail education that he has received at this school. Parents are very involved in the classrooms and teachers are welcoming parents concerns. This is one of the best elementry schools in the district.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2006

Awesome school. High level of parent involement, best PTO providing many programs other san diego schools do not offer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2006

We have had one child go from k thru 6 at ssf. She came into middle school and high school quite well prepared. We have two others in the school now that have been there since k. The principal has done a good job of weeding out the teachers that can't cut it or that teach in consistantly unprepared manner. Teachers are not asked back every year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2005

This school compares tremendously to a private school education but is a public school. Due to large family donations this school offers several programs outside the classroom that the state does not fund. Art, Science, PE and Differentiated Instruction are just to name a few. Parent involvement is high and consistent. The principal has been the same since 1 year after the school opened and is professional, fair and highly ethical.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2003

This is really like a private, public school. It is a relatively small school with a VERY active and GIVING parent body. The student population is somewhat diverse with some ESL students. We have 4 children (3 currently attending). We love this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

952

Change from
2012 to 2013

-2

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

952

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-2

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
76%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
75%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
96%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females93%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females90%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females91%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females91%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students98%
Females95%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability98%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students98%
Females95%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability98%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females95%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students81%
Females81%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students86%
Females95%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Females97%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students88%
Females93%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 73%
Hispanic 15%
Asian 9%
Two or more races 3%
Black 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 5%N/AN/A
English language learners 7%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 4%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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6570 El Apajo
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067
Phone: (858) 794-4700

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